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Re: [thewire] //Copyright monopoly and creative sounds

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  • Kraig Grady
    Hello Eric! If one is going to object to intellectual property then all property should be questioned. One cannot write on others walls without a fine but
    Message 1 of 41 , Apr 27, 2003
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      Hello Eric!
      If one is going to object to intellectual property then all property should be questioned. One cannot write on others walls without a fine but companies can "buy" billboards and do the equivalent grafitti. where is the free speech here? How much destruction have we seen by building "development".
      Patents seem to be far more of a problem in interfering with the development of music. I have known so many instrument designs that have died do to someone thinking they were going to make a million on something only a few want and basically nipping it in the bud. On the other hand i know of one individual who deliberately patented designs of some keyboards and allowed them to expire, thereby becoming public property. When Yamaha (for one) wanted to horde the keyboard , they were plain out of luck. On the other hand since they can't they haven't made any. with copyrights if one cannot use others sounds ( doesn't this force new ones? thereby progressing the art) without it screaming out its original idenity, then perhaps you have done nothing new. James Brown has the right to his scream. I see people tape shows and refuse artist limited acess to it.
      it is rather shallow thinking to think that if it on my tape recorder, it is mine.
      One more word on patents. look at digipak which cost substainially more due to the patent on them. this fact contributes to the pollution caused by the plastic of jewel cases flooding the market. it is one thing to make a profit, but they are gorging those who would like to use it. (i for one).


      Eric Namour wrote:

      > Dear all, I would be interested in getting your comments on a subject I am looking at for an academic paper: Do you believe that copyright {rigid} protection (its term is 'life of the author + 70 years) stifles creative sound/music making (mainly cut'n'paste, minimal electro, atmospheric/deconstructive Rock, field recording, etc...)? This is not a 'freedom of speech' consideration for we all do agree on the benefits of collaboration and sharing techniques/ideas/sound pieces within a defined marginal music community. This concerns the fact that copyright is purely an undeserved, uncreative (and many other 'un'!) future revenue streams which benefit only the big corporations and that Copyright Acts have hidden behind the excuse of 'protecting the public interest for the progress of Art'. I appreciate your help for that and thank you all in advance...
      >
      > Eric
      >
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      -- -Kraig Grady
      North American Embassy of Anaphoria Island
      http://www.anaphoria.com
      The Wandering Medicine Show
      KXLU 88.9 FM WED 8-9PM PST
    • Jim Flannery
      Olivier wrote to wire: OB Forgot to mention Bach s quoting of Vivaldi in some of his concertos... Or wholesale transcription, in the case of the Concerto for
      Message 41 of 41 , May 4, 2003
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        Olivier wrote to wire:

        OB> Forgot to mention Bach's quoting of Vivaldi in some of his concertos...

        Or wholesale transcription, in the case of the Concerto for 4 Klavier
        (based on a 4-violin concerto of Vivaldi's).

        There's a piece by Stockhausen I'd be appalled if I had to actually cite
        by name ;-). Mind you, Beethoven had fun with anthems in Wellington's
        Victory 1.5 century earlier ... I'm sure there are other uses of
        patriotic themes (oh wait, Ives, duh).

        The most startling intrusion I can think of -- it works just a sample,
        in fact most like a "cut-in" record -- is the quotation from a Beethoven
        sonata (I think it's from the prelude to the 4th movement of the
        Hammerklavier, but unfortunately Ch-Cr is still in storage so I can't
        check) in George Crumb's Makrokosmos v.2, which floats in like the Ghost
        in Hamlet.

        There's a metric ton of quotation in George Rochberg's post-60s work as
        well.

        --
        Jim Flannery newgrange@...

        "There are three things required for happiness: good health,
        selfishness, and stupidity, and without stupidity the others
        are useless." -- Gustave Flaubert

        np: F/i, _Why Not Now? ... Alan!_
        nr: Claude Lévi-Strauss, _Tristes Tropiques_
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