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Re: [thewire] Solaris

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  • Andrij Kopytko
    ... The Solaris soundtrack was composed by Cliff Martinez, who also has done soundtracks for The Limey, Traffic, and Sex, Lies & Videotape. He s a drummer, I
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 5, 2003
      >i watched the credits but did not see any mention of a composer or
      >performer.

      The Solaris soundtrack was composed by Cliff Martinez, who also has
      done soundtracks for The Limey, Traffic, and Sex, Lies & Videotape.
      He's a drummer, I believe.. I think he was in an early line-up of the
      Red Hot Chili Peppers of all things..
    • gradyfinklemyer
      Soderbergh seems to be getting more pompous and self-important. No! Full Frontal isn t smug and pretentious at all! It s a daring exploration of film making
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 5, 2003
        Soderbergh seems to be getting more pompous and self-important. No!
        Full Frontal isn't smug and pretentious at all! It's a daring
        exploration of film making done with a digital camera. It's
        Soderbergh's entry in the Dogme series. Arf arf. I can't think of a
        more usless movie than Ocean's 11 that I've cringed through recently
        either. I liked seeing George Clooney on Letterman stating that
        Soderbergh "wrote and directed Solaris", with no mention at all made
        of Tarkovsky! I think I'll do a remake of Full Frontal and go on tv
        and tell everyone I wrote and directed it. As far as Soderbergh's
        Solaris goes, I guess some people might enjoy looking at George
        Clooney's ass, but I'm not one of them.

        --- In thewire@yahoogroups.com, "Stevo" <stevolende@y...> wrote:
        > Just saw the new Stephen Soderbergh version
        > thought it pretty cool, but I haven't seen the Tarkovsky version in
        > years.
        >
        > Liked the musicthough I don't really know the area overwell.
        > Kind of Glass -y with near folk undertones.
        > Just wondering what other people think of the new version.
        >
        > Liked the way they used the backs of soundstage buildings as sets.
        > (least that's what tose outside shots look like after being on film
        > sites)
        > Is that a holdover from the original?
        > Stevo
        > NP Doors In Concert You make Me real
      • John Jones
        Yeah, agree - haven t actually seen the remake of Solaris but surely Soderbergh is the most overrated, useless director of the present day. The Limey, for
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 6, 2003
          Yeah, agree - haven't actually seen the remake of
          Solaris but surely Soderbergh is the most overrated,
          useless director of the present day. The Limey, for
          christsakes, was a joke (and that ridiculous cockney
          rhyming banter, lord give me a break!). The bloke
          seems to have a reputation for being 'good with
          actors'; oh great. Pity he can't direct for toffee.

          --- gradyfinklemyer <gradyfinklemyer@...>
          wrote:
          ---------------------------------
          Soderbergh seems to be getting more pompous and
          self-important. No!
          Full Frontal isn't smug and pretentious at all! It's a
          daring
          exploration of film making done with a digital camera.
          It's
          Soderbergh's entry in the Dogme series. Arf arf. I
          can't think of a
          more usless movie than Ocean's 11 that I've cringed
          through recently
          either. I liked seeing George Clooney on Letterman
          stating that
          Soderbergh "wrote and directed Solaris", with no
          mention at all made
          of Tarkovsky! I think I'll do a remake of Full Frontal
          and go on tv
          and tell everyone I wrote and directed it. As far as
          Soderbergh's
          Solaris goes, I guess some people might enjoy looking
          at George
          Clooney's ass, but I'm not one of them.

          --- In thewire@yahoogroups.com, "Stevo"
          <stevolende@y...> wrote:
          > Just saw the new Stephen Soderbergh version
          > thought it pretty cool, but I haven't seen the
          Tarkovsky version in
          > years.
          >
          > Liked the musicthough I don't really know the area
          overwell.
          > Kind of Glass -y with near folk undertones.
          > Just wondering what other people think of the new
          version.
          >
          > Liked the way they used the backs of soundstage
          buildings as sets.
          > (least that's what tose outside shots look like
          after being on film
          > sites)
          > Is that a holdover from the original?
          > Stevo
          > NP Doors In Concert You make Me real


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        • A.S. Van Dorston
          Warren Ellis (the Transmetropolitan comic writer, not member of Dirty Three) wrote this, which I agree with: I like George Clooney. No, not like that.
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 6, 2003
            Warren Ellis (the Transmetropolitan comic writer, not member of Dirty
            Three) wrote this, which I agree with:

            I like George Clooney.

            No, not like that.

            Clooney's someone who did an awful
            lot of shit before he got where he is
            today. He's been doing a bunch of
            interesting interviews to support
            SOLARIS and CONFESSIONS OF A
            DANGEROUS MIND, and in one of them
            he commented that whenever he
            turns on the TV at 3am, there he is
            in another terrible show, with another
            terrible hair crime. I think only Jean
            Claude Van Damme tops him for
            the visual archive of hair crimes
            committed over the last twenty
            years.

            Once he found himself in a position
            of power on ER -- in a gift of a role
            as the understated maverick who
            could never lose sympathy because
            he saved children's lives -- he started
            pulling stunts. He was instrumental
            in the episode of ER that the cast did
            live, twice in one night -- once for the
            East Coast, once for the West. Then
            he got involved in producing a remake
            of FAIL SAFE as a piece of live
            televisual theatre. Then came film,
            and starting again, doing some shit,
            clearly relearning how to act again,
            because an acting style that's
            charming on TV just dies on film.
            See how often he looks down, in
            those early films, retains cadences
            from TV. Then he hooked up with
            Steven Soderbergh. His head comes
            up, he learns economy and bigness
            at the same time. And in Soderbergh,
            one of America's cleverer risk-takers,
            he seemed to have found someone
            who thought the same way.

            In another recent interview, he lays
            this out. He says that the nature
            of the film beast is that in five or
            ten years, he won't be allowed in
            front of a camera, let alone behind
            it. So he needs to do the things he
            wants to do now, while he's in the
            position of power to make them
            happen. He comments that SOLARIS
            is flopping domestically, though it'll
            probably make most of its money
            back in foreign markets. But that
            doesn't matter. What matters is
            that they did it. The film is there.
            And it is -- I realise this flies against
            the face of all critics everywhere --
            a good film. I always hesitate to
            use the word "emotional" when
            discussing story, as I fear I sound like
            the wreckage of Francis Ford
            Coppola talking shit about the Godfather
            movies in the beginning of his twilight
            years. But SOLARIS has an unmannered,
            mature emotional complexity to it.
            It is, in fact, a Seventies art-film.
            It gets the best performance I've
            ever seen from Natasha McElhone,
            and Clooney is clearly fucking with
            his perceived star persona as the
            chilly, damaged psychiatrist. One
            of the character's friends calls him
            "a nihilist shrink."

            I grabbed the original Soderbergh
            script down from script-o-rama.com,
            and there are some interesting cuts.
            Anything that added to the science-
            fictional tone of the film got cut. It's
            all in the inference in the finished
            film. It's genre deconstruction,
            concentrating on the thing the majority
            of sf doesn't do -- creating a real
            life in the relationships.

            It may not be what anyone wanted
            to see, but it's the film they wanted
            to make.

            At similar peaks, people in Clooney's
            position tend to do things that will
            maintain or crest that peak. Running
            to stand still. There's something
            admirable in someone who says,
            now I'm going to do the things I need
            to do until they kick me off the peak.

            At 09:49 AM 3/6/03 +0000, you wrote:
            >Yeah, agree - haven't actually seen the remake of
            >Solaris but surely Soderbergh is the most overrated,
            >useless director of the present day. The Limey, for
            >christsakes, was a joke (and that ridiculous cockney
            >rhyming banter, lord give me a break!). The bloke
            >seems to have a reputation for being 'good with
            >actors'; oh great. Pity he can't direct for toffee.
          • David Beardsley
            ... From: Andrij Kopytko ... He was also in Capt. Beefheart s Magic Band - Ice Cream for Crow. * David Beardsley * microtonal guitar *
            Message 5 of 8 , Mar 8, 2003
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Andrij Kopytko" <andrij3@...>

              > The Solaris soundtrack was composed by Cliff Martinez, who also has
              > done soundtracks for The Limey, Traffic, and Sex, Lies & Videotape.
              > He's a drummer, I believe.. I think he was in an early line-up of the
              > Red Hot Chili Peppers of all things..

              He was also in Capt. Beefheart's Magic Band - Ice Cream for Crow.


              * David Beardsley
              * microtonal guitar
              * http://biink.com/db
            • dgromfin
              ... the Red Hot Chili Peppers of all things.. ... And the old school LA punk in me has to remind y all that he was also in the Weirdos and the Dickies... danny
              Message 6 of 8 , Mar 8, 2003
                > > He's a drummer, I believe.. I think he was in an early line-up of
                the Red Hot Chili Peppers of all things..
                >
                > He was also in Capt. Beefheart's Magic Band - Ice Cream for Crow.


                And the old school LA punk in me has to remind y'all that he was also
                in the Weirdos and the Dickies...

                danny
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