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Re: Reeds&electronics

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  • slsreeni
    ... Aa, I wouldn t start with that as my first Braxton. It s fairly dry, and ... better ... Thanks for the tips. ... music is ... wouldn t ... Well I dont
    Message 1 of 17 , Feb 26, 2002
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      --- In thewire@y..., "Vincent Kargatis / Anne Larson" <lartis@a...> >
      Aa, I wouldn't start with that as my first Braxton. It's fairly dry,
      and
      > perhaps not very illuminating as a first exposure. Plus, there are
      better
      > solo discs, WESLEYAN 1992 (hat ART) for one. I think most people

      Thanks for the tips.

      > Erstwhile is a legitimately experimental label, and most of the
      music is
      > genuinely "out there". Based on your reaction to SOLAR WIND, I
      wouldn't
      > necessarily expect you to enjoy this music - none of it could be

      Well I dont know-for example the following excerpt from the AMG
      review of Forlorn Green gives me the feeling this is right up my
      street.
      "The first track, "Man on the Outside," opens with several seconds of
      the noisy, echoing sounds of people in a large room before the space
      is suddenly sliced open by a deep but piercing blast from Greg
      Kelley's trumpet. That tone is picked up with related ones and looped
      by Jason Lescalleet's tape recorders, woven into a rich drone which
      is in turn commented upon by Kelley's trumpet, and so on. It's a
      wonderful and layered performance where it swiftly becomes impossible
      to tell which sounds are live, which not, and, indeed, who's
      responsible for a given effect. Not that it matters. The duo work
      hand in glove to produce a dense fabric of improvised sound tending.."

      Words like dense,rich,layered are usually what I look for though that
      maybe because I just havent encountered the right "throttled" stuff
      yet.

      > "accessible" in the conventional meaning. But I also encourage you
      to
      > listen more, and let your ears adjust - I hear nothing beauty-
      denying from
      > Parker/Casserley, and "texturally-throttled" sounds like a good
      time to me.

      Fair enough,the listening histories plus the constantly morphing idea-
      clusters that dictate our predilections are so webbily intricate that
      I've no problem appreciating that others happen to be at different
      listening coordinates vis a vis Parker+Casserly or whoever.I may get
      to those coordinates myself tomorrow,anything is possible!

      Cheers
      Sreeni.
    • Jim Flannery
      ... And also _Slow Music_, a duo of Coxhill and Morgan Fisher, from around the same time (1980) ... I do believe it had a reissue in the last couple of years.
      Message 2 of 17 , Feb 26, 2002
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        peter marsh wrote:
        >
        > one of my faves is the recent 'digswell duets' on
        > emanem featuring the estimable lol coxhill and simon

        And also _Slow Music_, a duo of Coxhill and Morgan Fisher, from around
        the same time (1980) ... I do believe it had a reissue in the last
        couple of years.

        --
        --------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Jim Flannery
        newgrange@...

        "When I say ‘no’ I’m always right and when I say ‘yes’
        I’m almost always wrong."
        -- Dwight Macdonald
        np: nothing
        nr: Julie Hecht, _Was this Man a Genius? Talks with Andy Kaufman_
      • slsreeni
        ... around ... More in this vein... 1.Ulrich Krieger - Walls of Sound I havent heard this one but the title sure is inviting.I dont think it features a lot of
        Message 3 of 17 , Feb 26, 2002
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          --- In thewire@y..., Jim Flannery <NEWGRANGE@S...> wrote:
          > peter marsh wrote:
          > >
          > > one of my faves is the recent 'digswell duets' on
          > > emanem featuring the estimable lol coxhill and simon
          >
          > And also _Slow Music_, a duo of Coxhill and Morgan Fisher, from
          around
          > the same time (1980) ... I do believe it had a reissue in the last
          > couple of years.
          >

          More in this vein...

          1.Ulrich Krieger - Walls of Sound
          I havent heard this one but the title sure is inviting.I dont think
          it features a lot of electronics but going by the reviews delivers on
          the atmosperic front.

          2.Rhys Chatham - Neon etc...
          Here's another Wire favorite,uses trumpet+electronics.His latest
          release features trumpet-stylings over breakbeats(?!isnt that so
          passe?).

          3.Mark Cunningham - Blood River Dusk inspired apparently by Cormac
          McCarthy's bloody novel Blood Meridian(lots of blood there!)
          Look here -
          http://www.experimentaclub.com/data/mark_cunningham/0index.htm

          Cheers
          Sreeni.
        • Kraig Grady
          He also worked with Phil Niblock on his Dideridoo piece! Also does performances involving stretched strings, dissected pianos. ... -- Kraig Grady North
          Message 4 of 17 , Feb 26, 2002
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            He also worked with Phil Niblock on his Dideridoo piece!
            Also does performances involving stretched strings, dissected pianos.

            slsreeni wrote:

            > 1.Ulrich Krieger - Walls of Sound
            > I havent heard this one but the title sure is inviting.I dont think
            > it features a lot of electronics but going by the reviews delivers on
            > the atmosperic front.

            -- Kraig Grady
            North American Embassy of Anaphoria island
            http://www.anaphoria.com

            The Wandering Medicine Show
            Wed. 8-9 KXLU 88.9 fm
          • Kristopher S. Handley
            ... No crime in SOLAR WIND not doing anything for you, though if it hasn t been mentioned yet, the first Evan Parker Electroacoustic Ensemble record, TOWARD
            Message 5 of 17 , Feb 27, 2002
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              >From: "slsreeni" <slsreeni@...>
              >Words like dense,rich,layered are usually what I look for though that
              >maybe because I just havent encountered the right "throttled" stuff
              >yet.

              No crime in SOLAR WIND not doing anything for you, though if it hasn't been
              mentioned yet, the first Evan Parker Electroacoustic Ensemble record, TOWARD
              THE MARGINS (ECM) is excellent and has a nice meeting of e/a textures and
              free improvisation; maybe more to your liking. The second EPEE record on
              ECM is pricklier, and I prefer it, but I guess I would try that one first.
              I badly wish this group would record again, at length. Maybe a live
              recording?

              Since Ersthwile was mentioned, I must say that the
              percussion-and-live-electronics meeting between Le Quan Ninh and Guenter
              Mueller, LA VOYELLE LIQUIDE, is a stand-out favorite of mine. It's gorgeous
              and mysterious and incredibly varied. Any records that kind of work in this
              vein (aggressive live concret, a little more Parmegiani/Henry than, say,
              p16.D4, who are also fab) would be much desired, and any recommendations
              appreciated. If you like free improv, and don't mind a little noise, you
              might really like the FLIRTS (Gert-Jan Prins and Cor Fuhler, on synths, etc)
              and BART (Thomas Lehn and Marcus Schmickler on aggressive synth/computer
              madness).

              -----a

              np: Parmentier, LUXSOUND (sigma editions)

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            • R. Lim
              ... You seem to be conflicting medium with message here. You can just as easily make boring, retrograde music with electronics as you can with a alto
              Message 6 of 17 , Mar 18, 2002
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                On Mon, 25 Feb 2002, slsreeni wrote:

                > You're right,however Braxton's ideas and sometimes his playing or
                > atleast Wire's accounts of them strike me as futuristic(and exciting!)
                > in the same way that most electronics strives to be.

                You seem to be conflicting medium with message here. You can just as
                easily make boring, retrograde music with electronics as you can with a
                alto saxophone. At any rate, Braxton's music is well-steeped in several
                traditions, including jazz (like the kind Wynton Marsalis likes) and
                academic classical music. His synthesis is really interesting, but I
                would hardly call it "futuristic".

                > Thanks for the suggestion,I've been thinking 19 Solo Compositions
                > myself with the cover art of flying albatrosses on Albion.What do you
                > think of it?

                I think this is one of his more lyrical solo records. I wouldn't recommend
                any of his solo records for an initiate except for the very first one (For
                Alto). One problem in diving into Braxton is that you kind of have to
                listen to a lot of them to get a real feel for what's going on, because
                his music definitely evolves over the first couple of decades (plus it
                helps to have at least a familiarity with jazz). In fact, I would say
                that it doesn't become fully realized until the 80s.

                This work-in-progress feel is particularly a problem with his solo
                records, which tend to come across as studies in improvisational methods
                rather than fully fledged pieces of music (explicitly so with the New
                Albion disc). Anyway, I would say that the thing that "9 out of 10
                Braxton fans" would agree on is that his late 80s/early 90s quartet with
                Crispell/Hemingway/Dresser remains the most consistent high water mark of
                his career. I personally think that chasing down his 70s output on Arista
                is a very illuminating process, but you might want to check some of that
                quartet stuff to make sure there's a "there" there for you.

                By the way, trumpets are not reed instruments.

                -rob
              • Kristopher S. Handley
                ... At the risk of opening a redundant can of worms, would anyone who s familiar with a very large chunk of Braxton s disco (say, upwards of 30 titles) care to
                Message 7 of 17 , Mar 18, 2002
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                  >One problem in diving into Braxton is that you kind of have to
                  >listen to a lot of them to get a real feel for what's going on, because
                  >his music definitely evolves over the first couple of decades (plus it
                  >helps to have at least a familiarity with jazz). In fact, I would say
                  >that it doesn't become fully realized until the 80s.

                  At the risk of opening a redundant can of worms, would anyone who's familiar
                  with a very large chunk of Braxton's disco (say, upwards of 30 titles) care
                  to sketch out an essential line of development in his music through his
                  catalog? I own probably 40 of his records (remorseful glance cast over
                  shoulder, into the void, turning into pillar of salt, etc etc), but it's
                  always interesting to see how serious listeners of his set up the crucial
                  turning points, etc. If anyone is willing to take a stab at this, please
                  include even stuff that was never rendered digital. I lost track after one
                  of the 'Ghost TRance" discs (a studio quartet recording), which was
                  dsiappointing at the time. I'm sure after I get back into the old man's
                  music again, everything will have dropped from print.

                  >I would say that the thing that "9 out of 10 Braxton fans" would agree >on
                  >is that his late 80s/early 90s quartet with
                  >Crispell/Hemingway/Dresser remains the most consistent high water mark...

                  I'd just like to chime in to say that the 4cd WILLISAU live and studio sets
                  by this band (HatArt) are phenomenal, and rather excellently recorded. They
                  have survived dozens of listens over the past 6 years for me. Amazing and
                  bold music.

                  -----s

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                • Vincent Kargatis / Anne Larson
                  From: Kristopher S. Handley ... As far as GTM goes, and since you re already a Braxton convert, you *must* check out Composition
                  Message 8 of 17 , Mar 19, 2002
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                    From: "Kristopher S. Handley" <thesubtlebody@...>
                    > I lost track after one
                    > of the 'Ghost TRance" discs (a studio quartet recording), which was
                    > dsiappointing at the time. I'm sure after I get back into the old man's
                    > music again, everything will have dropped from print.

                    As far as GTM goes, and since you're already a Braxton convert, you *must*
                    check out Composition 247 on Leo (2001), a marvelous GTM record with a trio
                    of two reeds and bagpipes. Really extends into newish-sounding territory
                    for Braxton, imo.
                    --
                    Vincent Kargatis
                    np: The New Pornographers - MASS ROMANTIC
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