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Missions in East Asia - Part 3 by Joseph Y. Lee

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  • josephylee@aol.com
    South Korea Missions in East Asia - Part 3 By Joseph Y. Lee It was June 29, 2000. I was at LAX. We were flying to Seoul, Korea for a retreat. It was a long
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 1, 2004
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      South Korea
      Missions in East Asia - Part 3
      By Joseph Y. Lee

      It was June 29, 2000. I was at LAX. We were flying to Seoul, Korea for a
      retreat. It was a long flight to Seoul, and the stewardesses in Asiana Airlines
      were quite cute. :) As our plane was flying over Seoul, I could not believe that
      there were so many 20 or more story buildings all over Korea! It was
      extremely exciting to be at Seoul, Korea. I had never been to Korea since I left Korea
      at nine months old. As we landed at Kimpo Airport, everyone around me was
      speaking Korean, and I could not understand a word they were saying. I could only
      say some Korean phrases like “yea-su nim e-room u-row kee-do du-room knee-da.
      Amen. (In Jesus we pray to give. Amen),” “yea-su nim nuhm dahng-she-il
      sang-rahng ham-ni-da. (Jesus loves you),” and “pae-gu pah (I am hungry).” Of
      course, I do know how to count in Korean. :)

      I heard many amazing testimonies from other Koreans. I could not believe that
      I met five blind elders at this church who literally memorized the New
      Testament twice. I wish that I could understand how to speak Korean. I have to marry
      a Korean Christian wife who can teach me how to speak Korean. :) It was hot
      and humid in Korea. The weather in Korea reminded me of the weather in
      Tennessee. I was extremely touched by those blind elders who suffered leprosy and the
      Korean War. One of the elders’ son was executed during the Japanese occupation
      because the elder’s son was a pastor. Those elders spoke at every Korean
      Christian radio broadcasting stations throughout Korea, and it was really exciting
      to hear their testimonies about how God changed their lives of hopelessness
      and rejection into joyful jubilation because of what God did for them on the
      cross. I could see that God really loved them. I could see that they also loved
      God regardless of their circumstances and difficulties. They actually praised
      God for their blindness because their blindness gave them a lot of time to
      memorize the entire New Testament when they did not have a job.

      Later, I heard another testimony about a Korean pastor during Korean War.
      This particular pastor had two sons, and a Communist youth killed both of the
      pastors’ sons even though the Communist youth knew both of the pastors’ sons.
      When the South Korean soldiers captured the Communist youth, they asked the
      pastor what they should do to the Communist. The pastor told the South Korean
      soldiers to let him go, and he also asked the Communist youth to be his adopted
      son. I just could not believe what the pastor did, and I just could not believe
      the story. Incredulous as it sounds, the story was true. I visited the museum
      in the countryside of Korea and saw the evidence that the testimony was true.

      After, we left the countryside of Korea where the elders gave their
      testimony. We were going to our retreat. It was truly amazing. (Not my Korean, by the
      way). I saw 10,000 believers who are Korean, and yet I did not see anyone who
      smoked a cigarette or drank alcohol. I had never seen so many Koreans in my
      life! It was exciting to be in Korea. We were staying in a nice air-conditioned
      hotel. I heard more incredible testimonies from other Korean pastors during the
      Korean War. I can not summarize their testimonies because I do not want to
      compromise the accuracy of the testimonies since I heard about them and did not
      actually write about them. It was encouraging to see that I am not the only
      Korean who is a Christian. :)

      I could talk forever about my experiences in Korea and in East Asia. My
      testimony is simply too long. After our sky resort retreat was over, Sung-min, Soo,
      and I were going to the Beggars’ Retreat so that God could train us for East
      Asia. The Beggars’ retreat was basically done through evangelizing throughout
      Korea without any money for three days. Sung-min and Soo were a lot of help in
      translating the Korean language for me. We basically begged for food
      throughout the countryside of Korea without any money. Even though we had no food or
      money, God used our team in the Beggar’s Retreat. God was really good to us. We
      were able to find a place to sleep every night at the local churches
      throughout the countryside of Korea without any money. However, all of the Korean
      speaking team members had a cellular phone. I was very challenged by the Korean
      speaking believers in our team. They were sharing their faith in Jesus Christ,
      and they were not ashamed. Even though nobody with whom we shared the gospel
      never became a Christian through us, we were worshiping God.

      P.S. By the way, I know that every Korean-American like myself faced a
      certain level of racism in the United States, but over 50,000 Americans lost their
      lives in the Korean War. Please try to thank the American veterans who fought
      in Korea.


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