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  • tiamat121
    Hi! How is everybody doing? Just wanted to say hi and express my worship of one of the greatest writers of our time. As Gibson says all sci-fi is based on the
    Message 1 of 13 , Sep 6, 2004
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      Hi! How is everybody doing? Just wanted to say hi and express my
      worship of one of the greatest writers of our time. As Gibson says
      all sci-fi is based on the present. His work is always a essay on
      today than of tomorrows that never will be.
      Currently I am taking a sabattical year to work, do nothing and
      learn just how hardlife really is, to then study cinema. My
      cyberpunk era dream is to take his work to film. Tough, can't even
      imagine it. I have seen Blade Runner and a lot of cyberpunk inspired
      cinema but it seems it is always lacking somehing, maybe my own
      point of view, lacking that certain grit.
      I guess we have a great collection of brains and ideas here, So how
      would you do a Gibson movie, of which novel and what would be a
      fatal error to miss?
    • damon888
      Of course, everybody would love to see Neuromancer brought to film, but the consensus seems to be that nobody could do it justice. I personally think it would
      Message 2 of 13 , Sep 7, 2004
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        Of course, everybody would love to see Neuromancer brought to film,
        but the consensus seems to be that nobody could do it justice. I
        personally think it would be better as an independent film rather
        than a big Hollywood production.

        --- In thesprawlofwilliamgibson@yahoogroups.com, "tiamat121"
        <zquallo@h...> wrote:
        > Hi! How is everybody doing? Just wanted to say hi and express my
        > worship of one of the greatest writers of our time. As Gibson says
        > all sci-fi is based on the present. His work is always a essay on
        > today than of tomorrows that never will be.
        > Currently I am taking a sabattical year to work, do nothing and
        > learn just how hardlife really is, to then study cinema. My
        > cyberpunk era dream is to take his work to film. Tough, can't even
        > imagine it. I have seen Blade Runner and a lot of cyberpunk
        inspired
        > cinema but it seems it is always lacking somehing, maybe my own
        > point of view, lacking that certain grit.
        > I guess we have a great collection of brains and ideas here, So how
        > would you do a Gibson movie, of which novel and what would be a
        > fatal error to miss?
      • Dexter K. Flowers
        First, Gibson material is 0 for 2 in terms of good movie adaptations. The reasons vary-- Johnny Mneumonic capturing the surface and ignoring the spirit in the
        Message 3 of 13 , Sep 7, 2004
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          First, Gibson material is 0 for 2 in terms of good movie adaptations.
          The reasons vary--"Johnny Mneumonic" capturing the surface and ignoring
          the spirit in the story; "New Rose Hotel" capturing the spirit but
          suffering from a terminal case of plotlessness. This doesn't mean that
          Gibson's work can't translate to film. Rather, it's probably the case
          that thus far the wrong stories have been chosen.

          However, forget about a "Neuromancer" movie. Everything that was
          strange, cool, and innovative twenty years ago when the novel was
          published has been co-opted and appropriated by other movies, books, TV
          shows, etc. so that now those story elements seem run of the mill. A
          "Neuromancer" movie wouldn't say as much to us now as it would have
          then. It would seem quaint, even nostalgic, because the novel is a
          vision of a future that has either been sidestepped or accepted as an
          integral aspect of our daily lives. For instance, a nuclear war in
          Europe seems very 80s. But even more to the point, The Net, instead of
          being a wild west for digital cowboys, is now the method many of us use
          to buy products and pay bills.

          That said, the Gibson movie I'd make would be one of the Bridge Trilogy
          novels. Unlike the Sprawl novels, they are closer to what our "present"
          is like, and are more focused on social commentary and cultural critique
          than on high-tech gadgets. Furthermore, the stories are simpler and
          easier to translate into screenplays, the budgets would be modest, and
          the characters are more dynamic, too. For instance, "Virtual Light"
          would be very "now" if a filmaker focused on the bridge and, instead of
          VR glasses as the macguffin, simply used (like Hitchcock) an unspecified
          "black box."

          tiamat121 wrote:

          > Hi! How is everybody doing? Just wanted to say hi and express my
          > worship of one of the greatest writers of our time. As Gibson says
          > all sci-fi is based on the present. His work is always a essay on
          > today than of tomorrows that never will be.
          > Currently I am taking a sabattical year to work, do nothing and
          > learn just how hardlife really is, to then study cinema. My
          > cyberpunk era dream is to take his work to film. Tough, can't even
          > imagine it. I have seen Blade Runner and a lot of cyberpunk inspired
          > cinema but it seems it is always lacking somehing, maybe my own
          > point of view, lacking that certain grit.
          > I guess we have a great collection of brains and ideas here, So how
          > would you do a Gibson movie, of which novel and what would be a
          > fatal error to miss?
          >
          >
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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Joby Jull
          I dont knwo aobut that... I think iot is ppossible to do good with a gibson movie, BUT: Because of the number of ideas that were incorporated into the matrix
          Message 4 of 13 , Sep 7, 2004
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            I dont knwo aobut that... I think iot is ppossible to do good with a gibson
            movie, BUT: Because of the number of ideas that were incorporated into "the
            matrix" it would be almost impossible to get the general populace to like
            the movie. In addion, Most peopel would Mark it as "unrealistic" (Note,
            there are Many many ways to represent the net. Most people thinks the the
            socalled World WIde Web (HTML based pages) is the entire internet. most
            people dont realize that that hardly scratches the surface.)

            exscuse me if i rambe off on tangents please.
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Dexter K. Flowers" <dexflow@...>
            To: <thesprawlofwilliamgibson@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Tuesday, September 07, 2004 9:06 AM
            Subject: Re: [The Sprawl of William Gibson] Hi Want a bonbon?


            > First, Gibson material is 0 for 2 in terms of good movie adaptations.
            > The reasons vary--"Johnny Mneumonic" capturing the surface and ignoring
            > the spirit in the story; "New Rose Hotel" capturing the spirit but
            > suffering from a terminal case of plotlessness. This doesn't mean that
            > Gibson's work can't translate to film. Rather, it's probably the case
            > that thus far the wrong stories have been chosen.
            >
            > However, forget about a "Neuromancer" movie. Everything that was
            > strange, cool, and innovative twenty years ago when the novel was
            > published has been co-opted and appropriated by other movies, books, TV
            > shows, etc. so that now those story elements seem run of the mill. A
            > "Neuromancer" movie wouldn't say as much to us now as it would have
            > then. It would seem quaint, even nostalgic, because the novel is a
            > vision of a future that has either been sidestepped or accepted as an
            > integral aspect of our daily lives. For instance, a nuclear war in
            > Europe seems very 80s. But even more to the point, The Net, instead of
            > being a wild west for digital cowboys, is now the method many of us use
            > to buy products and pay bills.
            >
            > That said, the Gibson movie I'd make would be one of the Bridge Trilogy
            > novels. Unlike the Sprawl novels, they are closer to what our "present"
            > is like, and are more focused on social commentary and cultural critique
            > than on high-tech gadgets. Furthermore, the stories are simpler and
            > easier to translate into screenplays, the budgets would be modest, and
            > the characters are more dynamic, too. For instance, "Virtual Light"
            > would be very "now" if a filmaker focused on the bridge and, instead of
            > VR glasses as the macguffin, simply used (like Hitchcock) an unspecified
            > "black box."
            >
            > tiamat121 wrote:
            >
            > > Hi! How is everybody doing? Just wanted to say hi and express my
            > > worship of one of the greatest writers of our time. As Gibson says
            > > all sci-fi is based on the present. His work is always a essay on
            > > today than of tomorrows that never will be.
            > > Currently I am taking a sabattical year to work, do nothing and
            > > learn just how hardlife really is, to then study cinema. My
            > > cyberpunk era dream is to take his work to film. Tough, can't even
            > > imagine it. I have seen Blade Runner and a lot of cyberpunk inspired
            > > cinema but it seems it is always lacking somehing, maybe my own
            > > point of view, lacking that certain grit.
            > > I guess we have a great collection of brains and ideas here, So how
            > > would you do a Gibson movie, of which novel and what would be a
            > > fatal error to miss?
            > >
            > >
            > > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
            > > ADVERTISEMENT
            > >
            <http://us.ard.yahoo.com/SIG=129madvc4/M=298184.5285298.6392945.3001176/D=gr
            oups/S=1705198328:HM/EXP=1094621706/A=2319498/R=0/SIG=11thfntfp/*http://www.
            netflix.com/Default?mqso=60185352&partid=5285298>
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
            > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > > * To visit your group on the web, go to:
            > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/thesprawlofwilliamgibson/
            > >
            > > * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > > thesprawlofwilliamgibson-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            > >
            <mailto:thesprawlofwilliamgibson-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubsc
            ribe>
            > >
            > > * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
            > > Service <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>.
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Matt Mooney
            I daydream scenes from my film version of neuromancer all the time. most notably molly flying down(up) the tunnel to get into the villa straylight. soundtrack
            Message 5 of 13 , Sep 7, 2004
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              I daydream scenes from my film version of neuromancer all the time.
              most notably molly flying down(up) the tunnel to get into the villa
              straylight.

              soundtrack is STP's "Core"


              --- tiamat121 <zquallo@...> wrote:

              > Hi! How is everybody doing? Just wanted to say hi and express my
              > worship of one of the greatest writers of our time. As Gibson says
              > all sci-fi is based on the present. His work is always a essay on
              > today than of tomorrows that never will be.
              > Currently I am taking a sabattical year to work, do nothing and
              > learn just how hardlife really is, to then study cinema. My
              > cyberpunk era dream is to take his work to film. Tough, can't even
              > imagine it. I have seen Blade Runner and a lot of cyberpunk inspired
              > cinema but it seems it is always lacking somehing, maybe my own
              > point of view, lacking that certain grit.
              > I guess we have a great collection of brains and ideas here, So how
              > would you do a Gibson movie, of which novel and what would be a
              > fatal error to miss?
              >
              >


              =====
              --Matt Mooney



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            • Chris
              I agree that a movie of Neuromancer would be difficult and/or disappointing in it s final result. And, would seem, yet another attempt to create a decent
              Message 6 of 13 , Sep 7, 2004
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                I agree that a movie of Neuromancer would be difficult and/or
                disappointing in it's final result. And, would seem, yet another
                attempt to create a decent Internet flick. I believe there is
                someone whom could invision a cyberspace that is different from
                Johnny N, or AI's that don't remind us of Vituosity. "Web" sites
                where you can visit and order a beer or get your ass handed to you on
                a plater. But let's think more in terms of the rest of the
                environment.

                Entities evolving from machine code to Gods. The idea that Gods do
                exist and use cyberspace a stomping ground. Or that your life is
                controlled and/or manipulated by and AI.

                The whole aspect of "cyborg"ism. Where plastic surgery uses Silicon
                of a different sort and body parts, Human or otherwise are grown or
                harvested for the general masses. Cults that take advantage of the
                current Tech levels and realy become other than human.

                Families/companies so big and rich that the wealth is it's own
                entity. Cloning and cryogenics and showing society there back side
                by creating there own space colonies.

                These are just Neuromancer. Count Zero and Mona Lisa Overdrive have
                a slew of other ideas to offer. I don't believe this aspects are to
                far outside the possiblities of our current society. Tech, yes, but
                not the philosophy behind it.

                Slappy
              • Gildor Inglorion
                we are familiar with Gibson s world, even we who havent read much of him... we have seen bits from him, here and there, some movies, art, novels etc but we
                Message 7 of 13 , Sep 7, 2004
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                  we are familiar with Gibson's world, even we who
                  havent read much of him...

                  we have seen bits from him, here and there, some
                  movies, art, novels etc but we have never seen
                  something on the big screen as a WHOLE. For this
                  reason I think a pure Gibson movie would be more
                  original than we think.

                  LOTR is a good example. We all know Elves, Dwarves
                  etc, but it is the first movie ever who adapted the
                  RGP-fantasy-epic world so well and brought human-like
                  Elves and Dwarves to the screen.

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                • tiamat121
                  Great ideas. To create a Gibson movie that parallels the book or is even close is .. amazingly hard to even conceive. I beleive that all these concepts that
                  Message 8 of 13 , Sep 7, 2004
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                    Great ideas. To create a Gibson movie that parallels the book or is
                    even close is .. amazingly hard to even conceive. I beleive that all
                    these concepts that have come to evolve from Gibson. His big
                    theories on wealth, the internet, technology, interstitial
                    communities as the bridge, arcologies and the future of capitalism.
                    To the small details present in the iconography of a future world,
                    fashion and the people who live it.
                    With his amazingly detailed work, a few key pieces would be very
                    touchy to render (cyberspace, characters etc.). Making a movie for
                    fans of Gibson, instead of toning down the subject still hasn't been
                    down.
                    Due to the complicated technology in his stories, budget and money
                    become a important issue that could taint the worl. Currently I'm
                    gunning for a quick run of short films (20-40 minutes) on his
                    Burning Chrome stories.
                    Scenes from the Gernsback Continuum, Hinterlands and obviously
                    Burning Chrome, highlight sides of his work most people don't
                    recognize. Well whatever. Great ideas.

                    Maybe she was slumming, or checking out the human condition, a
                    condition she didn't exactly aspire to.
                  • Tommy Foster
                    I have to agree that the Bridge books would likely be easier to adapt to film; I can t help but think that audiences would react to the sight of the Golden
                    Message 9 of 13 , Sep 8, 2004
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                      I have to agree that the Bridge books would likely be easier to adapt to film; I can't help but think that audiences would react to the sight of the Golden Gate bridge as a place where people live, and no longer drive.


                      >From: "tiamat121" <zquallo@...>
                      >To: thesprawlofwilliamgibson@yahoogroups.com
                      >Subject: Re: [The Sprawl of William Gibson] Hi Want a bonbon?
                      >Date: Tue, 07 Sep 2004 21:13:32 -0000
                      >
                      >Great ideas. To create a Gibson movie that parallels the book or is
                      >even close is .. amazingly hard to even conceive. I beleive that all
                      >these concepts that have come to evolve from Gibson. His big
                      >theories on wealth, the internet, technology, interstitial
                      >communities as the bridge, arcologies and the future of capitalism.
                      >To the small details present in the iconography of a future world,
                      >fashion and the people who live it.
                      >With his amazingly detailed work, a few key pieces would be very
                      >touchy to render (cyberspace, characters etc.). Making a movie for
                      >fans of Gibson, instead of toning down the subject still hasn't been
                      >down.
                      >Due to the complicated technology in his stories, budget and money
                      >become a important issue that could taint the worl. Currently I'm
                      >gunning for a quick run of short films (20-40 minutes) on his
                      >Burning Chrome stories.
                      >Scenes from the Gernsback Continuum, Hinterlands and obviously
                      >Burning Chrome, highlight sides of his work most people don't
                      >recognize. Well whatever. Great ideas.
                      >
                      >Maybe she was slumming, or checking out the human condition, a
                      >condition she didn't exactly aspire to.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
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                    • martin mazzocco
                      ... It isn t so much the material but rather the director interpretation of the material, as well as studio demands to meet to todays fickle mainstream
                      Message 10 of 13 , Sep 8, 2004
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                        --- "Dexter K. Flowers" <dexflow@...> wrote:

                        > First, Gibson material is 0 for 2 in terms of good
                        > movie adaptations.
                        > The reasons vary--"Johnny Mneumonic" capturing the
                        > surface and ignoring
                        > the spirit in the story; "New Rose Hotel" capturing
                        > the spirit but
                        > suffering from a terminal case of plotlessness. This
                        > doesn't mean that
                        > Gibson's work can't translate to film. Rather, it's
                        > probably the case
                        > that thus far the wrong stories have been chosen.\


                        It isn't so much the material but rather the
                        director interpretation of the material, as well as
                        studio demands to meet to todays fickle mainstream
                        audiences.
                        IMHO, any film version of Gibson's work needs to be
                        a small indie type of project in order to capture the
                        spirit of his writing.


                        >
                        > However, forget about a "Neuromancer" movie.
                        > Everything that was
                        > strange, cool, and innovative twenty years ago when
                        > the novel was
                        > published has been co-opted and appropriated by
                        > other movies, books, TV
                        > shows, etc. so that now those story elements seem
                        > run of the mill. A
                        > "Neuromancer" movie wouldn't say as much to us now
                        > as it would have
                        > then. It would seem quaint, even nostalgic, because
                        > the novel is a
                        > vision of a future that has either been sidestepped
                        > or accepted as an
                        > integral aspect of our daily lives. For instance, a
                        > nuclear war in
                        > Europe seems very 80s. But even more to the point,
                        > The Net, instead of
                        > being a wild west for digital cowboys, is now the
                        > method many of us use
                        > to buy products and pay bills.


                        I think his version of the Net is only one aspect of
                        that book. The real story (as in any novel) is the
                        human element. The idea of Case (a self-hating
                        anti-hero) looking for redemption in a society stuck
                        on permanent fast-forward. if you focus on the obvious
                        spectacular (and predictable) elemants of the novel
                        then you lose it's main idea.


                        >
                        > That said, the Gibson movie I'd make would be one of
                        > the Bridge Trilogy
                        > novels. Unlike the Sprawl novels, they are closer to
                        > what our "present"

                        I completely disagree. The Sprawl is meant to mirror
                        contemporary society in many ways and I see familiar
                        everyday elements. Hyperbole and metaphor are what
                        seperates the two societies. Human nature, the book's
                        main focus when you strip it down, never changes.
                        Longing, need, greed, lust - those are the same
                        emotions in this world or in the future. That's the
                        reason "Neuromancer" was, and still is so popular.


                        KoS



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                      • phyber_cable
                        James Cameron wrote strange days which, when I first saw it, I thought must have been from a Gibson story. I think, even as rich as he is, he could do burning
                        Message 11 of 13 , Sep 9, 2004
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                          James Cameron wrote strange days which, when I first saw it, I
                          thought must have been from a Gibson story. I think, even as rich as
                          he is, he could do burning chrome or other stories justice.

                          --- In thesprawlofwilliamgibson@yahoogroups.com, martin mazzocco
                          <kingsofsleep@y...> wrote:
                          >
                          > --- "Dexter K. Flowers" <dexflow@v...> wrote:
                          >
                          > > First, Gibson material is 0 for 2 in terms of good
                          > > movie adaptations.
                          > > The reasons vary--"Johnny Mneumonic" capturing the
                          > > surface and ignoring
                          > > the spirit in the story; "New Rose Hotel" capturing
                          > > the spirit but
                          > > suffering from a terminal case of plotlessness. This
                          > > doesn't mean that
                          > > Gibson's work can't translate to film. Rather, it's
                          > > probably the case
                          > > that thus far the wrong stories have been chosen.\
                          >
                          >
                          > It isn't so much the material but rather the
                          > director interpretation of the material, as well as
                          > studio demands to meet to todays fickle mainstream
                          > audiences.
                          > IMHO, any film version of Gibson's work needs to be
                          > a small indie type of project in order to capture the
                          > spirit of his writing.
                          >
                          >
                          > >
                          > > However, forget about a "Neuromancer" movie.
                          > > Everything that was
                          > > strange, cool, and innovative twenty years ago when
                          > > the novel was
                          > > published has been co-opted and appropriated by
                          > > other movies, books, TV
                          > > shows, etc. so that now those story elements seem
                          > > run of the mill. A
                          > > "Neuromancer" movie wouldn't say as much to us now
                          > > as it would have
                          > > then. It would seem quaint, even nostalgic, because
                          > > the novel is a
                          > > vision of a future that has either been sidestepped
                          > > or accepted as an
                          > > integral aspect of our daily lives. For instance, a
                          > > nuclear war in
                          > > Europe seems very 80s. But even more to the point,
                          > > The Net, instead of
                          > > being a wild west for digital cowboys, is now the
                          > > method many of us use
                          > > to buy products and pay bills.
                          >
                          >
                          > I think his version of the Net is only one aspect of
                          > that book. The real story (as in any novel) is the
                          > human element. The idea of Case (a self-hating
                          > anti-hero) looking for redemption in a society stuck
                          > on permanent fast-forward. if you focus on the obvious
                          > spectacular (and predictable) elemants of the novel
                          > then you lose it's main idea.
                          >
                          >
                          > >
                          > > That said, the Gibson movie I'd make would be one of
                          > > the Bridge Trilogy
                          > > novels. Unlike the Sprawl novels, they are closer to
                          > > what our "present"
                          >
                          > I completely disagree. The Sprawl is meant to mirror
                          > contemporary society in many ways and I see familiar
                          > everyday elements. Hyperbole and metaphor are what
                          > seperates the two societies. Human nature, the book's
                          > main focus when you strip it down, never changes.
                          > Longing, need, greed, lust - those are the same
                          > emotions in this world or in the future. That's the
                          > reason "Neuromancer" was, and still is so popular.
                          >
                          >
                          > KoS
                          >
                          >
                          >
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                        • martin mazzocco
                          ... I think just about any short story of Gibson is film worthy. I am leery of putting novels on film. The stories are told in two different ways. Something
                          Message 12 of 13 , Sep 9, 2004
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                            --- phyber_cable <phyber_cable@...> wrote:

                            > James Cameron wrote strange days which, when I first
                            > saw it, I
                            > thought must have been from a Gibson story. I
                            > think, even as rich as
                            > he is, he could do burning chrome or other stories
                            > justice.


                            I think just about any short story of Gibson is film
                            worthy. I am leery of putting novels on film. The
                            stories are told in two different ways. Something will
                            always be left behind when adapting a novel to film.
                            The important thing in this sort of endeavor
                            (putting Gibson on the big screen) is to realize where
                            your story (for the film) lies. You can usually only
                            have one major conflict in film and not very many
                            subplots, otherwise you run the risk of bogging down
                            your film and confusing your viewers.
                            Short stories tend to be simplified in terms of
                            conflict and resolution so they (IMHO) make excellent
                            material to adapt.



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                          • Gildor Inglorion
                            I think this matter has been mentioned before but... I find it strange that Wintermute used images from the memory of Case, but images from Chiba and
                            Message 13 of 13 , Sep 10, 2004
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                              I think this matter has been mentioned before but... I
                              find it strange that Wintermute used images from the
                              memory of Case, but images from Chiba and Wintermute
                              took forms of persons Case met only in the process of
                              the books, like Finn and Zon...

                              this seems strange, like if they were the only persons
                              Case ever met and Chiba was the only city he has been
                              in, like he had no past or childhood before the book
                              began (of course he didn't have since he 'exists' only
                              in the book :)) but for example i would find it more
                              convenient if Wintermute appeared in forms from Case
                              unmentioned past, childhood, youth, or even those
                              russians he was working for

                              i imagine this as an artistic license, to make the
                              reading more easy.. but is there an 'internal'
                              exaplanation of this?

                              hope that you understand what i want to say :)

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