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HUMANE TEEN * Teach Kids to Care About Animals

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  • defend_peta
    HUMANE TEEN TEACH KIDS TO CARE ABOUT ANIMALS Go to to http://tinyurl.com/qolog read online Go to http://tinyurl.com/ekhpr to protect animals Animal suffering
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 1, 2006
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      HUMANE TEEN

      TEACH KIDS TO CARE ABOUT ANIMALS

      Go to to http://tinyurl.com/qolog read online

      Go to http://tinyurl.com/ekhpr to protect animals

      Animal suffering is all too common in our society. Yet so many of its
      causes—puppy mills, circuses, greyhounds, pet overpopulation—can be
      eliminated through humane education that teaches people at an early
      age to care about and make better decisions for animals. If you or
      your animal protection club would like to reach out to elementary-
      school kids in your community, here are some ideas for starting a
      humane education program.

      1. WHAT'S IMPORTANT? Decide what issues you'd like to teach younger
      children about. For children in grades K-4, appropriate topics
      include proper pet care, dog bite prevention, and respect for
      wildlife and habitats. Children in grades 5-6 may be able to handle
      issues such as pet overpopulation, the connection between puppy mills
      and pet stores, and events that exploit animals, such as greyhound
      racing and circuses. You may also wish to explore http://www.hsus.org
      for topic ideas.

      2. GET IN TOUCH. Before you invest time or money into your project,
      contact the elementary-school teacher(s) whose classes you'd like to
      work with. Explain who you are and the specific topics you'd like to
      teach. Most people will be open to lessons on proper pet care and dog
      bite prevention, but some may be reluctant to introduce topics that
      may be controversial or upsetting to children, such as the problems
      of circuses or pet overpopulation. Keep an open mind and realize that
      any humane message you can get through to kids is better than none at
      all.

      3. KNOW YOUR STUFF. Research whatever issue(s) you'd like to educate
      kids about. Visit reliable, up-to-date websites and contact reputable
      organizations for information. A list of good websites may be found
      on HumaneTeen in the "Recommended Links" (http://tinyurl.com/najj8)
      section.

      4. GET THE GOODS. You'll need a plan and materials. Decide how you'd
      like to approach kids about the humane issues you've selected. Don't
      rely on just standing up before the class and lecturing. Engage the
      students with interactive, age-appropriate materials and activities.
      For example, you may wish to put on a puppet show about proper pet
      care, give a demonstration with plush animals about staying safe
      around dogs, or provide students with coloring pages or worksheets.
      Run your ideas by your club's adult advisor for input. If an
      elementary-school teacher is available, ask him or her to go over
      your lesson plans and offer advice.

      If you don't wish to develop your own materials, you may wish to
      purchase humane education materials from the National Association for
      Humane and Environmental Education (NAHEE), youth education division
      of The Humane Society of the United States. In addition to publishing
      HumaneTeen, NAHEE also provides effective, high quality publications
      and programs to teachers, students, and animal sheltering
      professionals. The materials are fairly inexpensive and easy to use.
      Items of particular use to high-school students wishing to teach
      younger students about animal issues include the BARK Dog Bite
      Prevention Program, KIND Teacher, Critters with Character, Color Me
      KIND coloring books, and KIND News. To learn more about these
      materials or to order online, please visit
      http://www.nahee.org/shoppingcart. For more information about how
      your club could use these to reach elementary school students in your
      area, please e-mail nahee@... or call (860) 434-8666.

      5. GIVE A CALL. Arrange a day and time for your club to visit the
      elementary school. Make sure this is a convenient time for the
      teacher whose class you're visiting. Check with your adult advisor or
      school counselor to see if you can go during your school hours or as
      part of a service-learning requirement. Many high schools release
      students well before elementary schools do, so you may be able to
      visit the classroom once you get out of school.

      6. BE PREPARED. The key to a successful presentation is preparation.
      Practice your presentation before friends, relatives, or club
      members. Make sure you have all the materials you will need. For
      example, if you are distributing worksheets or coloring pages, make
      sure that you have made enough copies for each student; if you're
      bringing a video, make sure the classroom has a VCR.

      7. HAVE FUN—AND FOLLOW UP! During and after your presentation, be
      sure to let kids ask questions about you, your club, and the lesson
      you presented. You may wish to follow up your lesson by distributing
      a survey. Survey questions could include: What did you learn today?
      When it comes to animals, will you do anything differently? If so,
      what? What was your favorite part of today's lesson? Least favorite?
      Would you like us to visit again? What other animal-related issues
      would you like to learn about? Compile the survey results to gauge
      how effective your lesson was at teaching relevant information,
      changing children's attitudes and perceptions, and engaging their
      interest. Be sure to thank the teacher for allowing your club to
      visit.

      8. KEEP NOTES. Maintain a notebook of your club's elementary school
      visits and lessons. Note your survey results, which presentations
      were effective, and which lessons needed work. That will help you be
      more effective in the future. As always, let us know about your
      humane education efforts at humaneteen@.... We may publish your
      efforts in HumaneTeen. Your story could inspire other high-school
      students to reach out to young kids in their community!
    • BEN MILLER
      I teach my kids to be nice to animals even to bugs that benefit us. Not all Puppy Mills are bad. I beleive there are more good then bad. Those breeding for the
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 1, 2006
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        I teach my kids to be nice to animals even to bugs
        that benefit us. Not all Puppy Mills are bad. I
        beleive there are more good then bad. Those breeding
        for the fast buck and no care for their animals are
        the bad ones. You can breed for maximum production
        with out hurting the dogs. Why pick on Circus' they
        need to take care of their animals so they perform. A
        sick/abused animal does not perform good enough to
        satify the customers there. Those are the ones that go
        out of business fast. Dog races are a money sport just
        like horse and car races. The thing is to get the fast
        dog you have to go through several to get there. They
        do have greyhound rescue that place retired dogs into
        family homes but are pretty much need to get out and
        strech their legs alot. This does not make them the
        best dog for most people. As I said it is a money
        sport and need to get people to stop betting on them
        before anything will change. Then you have all the
        dogs racing to put somewhere. Yes we need to breed
        responsible at least till we start using dogs for food
        like other countries. I don't like to see animals
        killed and dumped and no useful purpose for it. My
        family nuerted/fix all of ours because are not
        planning to breed them.
        Ben
        Ca


        --- defend_peta <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

        > HUMANE TEEN
        >
        > TEACH KIDS TO CARE ABOUT ANIMALS
        >
        > Go to to http://tinyurl.com/qolog read online
        >
        > Go to http://tinyurl.com/ekhpr to protect animals
        >
        > Animal suffering is all too common in our society.
        > Yet so many of its
        > causes—puppy mills, circuses, greyhounds, pet
        > overpopulation—can be
        > eliminated through humane education that teaches
        > people at an early
        > age to care about and make better decisions for
        > animals. If you or
        > your animal protection club would like to reach out
        > to elementary-
        > school kids in your community, here are some ideas
        > for starting a
        > humane education program.
        >
        > 1. WHAT'S IMPORTANT? Decide what issues you'd like
        > to teach younger
        > children about. For children in grades K-4,
        > appropriate topics
        > include proper pet care, dog bite prevention, and
        > respect for
        > wildlife and habitats. Children in grades 5-6 may be
        > able to handle
        > issues such as pet overpopulation, the connection
        > between puppy mills
        > and pet stores, and events that exploit animals,
        > such as greyhound
        > racing and circuses. You may also wish to explore
        > http://www.hsus.org
        > for topic ideas.
        >
        > 2. GET IN TOUCH. Before you invest time or money
        > into your project,
        > contact the elementary-school teacher(s) whose
        > classes you'd like to
        > work with. Explain who you are and the specific
        > topics you'd like to
        > teach. Most people will be open to lessons on proper
        > pet care and dog
        > bite prevention, but some may be reluctant to
        > introduce topics that
        > may be controversial or upsetting to children, such
        > as the problems
        > of circuses or pet overpopulation. Keep an open mind
        > and realize that
        > any humane message you can get through to kids is
        > better than none at
        > all.
        >
        > 3. KNOW YOUR STUFF. Research whatever issue(s) you'd
        > like to educate
        > kids about. Visit reliable, up-to-date websites and
        > contact reputable
        > organizations for information. A list of good
        > websites may be found
        > on HumaneTeen in the "Recommended Links"
        > (http://tinyurl.com/najj8)
        > section.
        >
        > 4. GET THE GOODS. You'll need a plan and materials.
        > Decide how you'd
        > like to approach kids about the humane issues you've
        > selected. Don't
        > rely on just standing up before the class and
        > lecturing. Engage the
        > students with interactive, age-appropriate materials
        > and activities.
        > For example, you may wish to put on a puppet show
        > about proper pet
        > care, give a demonstration with plush animals about
        > staying safe
        > around dogs, or provide students with coloring pages
        > or worksheets.
        > Run your ideas by your club's adult advisor for
        > input. If an
        > elementary-school teacher is available, ask him or
        > her to go over
        > your lesson plans and offer advice.
        >
        > If you don't wish to develop your own materials, you
        > may wish to
        > purchase humane education materials from the
        > National Association for
        > Humane and Environmental Education (NAHEE), youth
        > education division
        > of The Humane Society of the United States. In
        > addition to publishing
        > HumaneTeen, NAHEE also provides effective, high
        > quality publications
        > and programs to teachers, students, and animal
        > sheltering
        > professionals. The materials are fairly inexpensive
        > and easy to use.
        > Items of particular use to high-school students
        > wishing to teach
        > younger students about animal issues include the
        > BARK Dog Bite
        > Prevention Program, KIND Teacher, Critters with
        > Character, Color Me
        > KIND coloring books, and KIND News. To learn more
        > about these
        > materials or to order online, please visit
        > http://www.nahee.org/shoppingcart. For more
        > information about how
        > your club could use these to reach elementary school
        > students in your
        > area, please e-mail nahee@... or call (860)
        > 434-8666.
        >
        > 5. GIVE A CALL. Arrange a day and time for your club
        > to visit the
        > elementary school. Make sure this is a convenient
        > time for the
        > teacher whose class you're visiting. Check with your
        > adult advisor or
        > school counselor to see if you can go during your
        > school hours or as
        > part of a service-learning requirement. Many high
        > schools release
        > students well before elementary schools do, so you
        > may be able to
        > visit the classroom once you get out of school.
        >
        > 6. BE PREPARED. The key to a successful presentation
        > is preparation.
        > Practice your presentation before friends,
        > relatives, or club
        > members. Make sure you have all the materials you
        > will need. For
        > example, if you are distributing worksheets or
        > coloring pages, make
        > sure that you have made enough copies for each
        > student; if you're
        > bringing a video, make sure the classroom has a VCR.
        >
        >
        > 7. HAVE FUN—AND FOLLOW UP! During and after your
        > presentation, be
        > sure to let kids ask questions about you, your club,
        > and the lesson
        > you presented. You may wish to follow up your lesson
        > by distributing
        > a survey. Survey questions could include: What did
        > you learn today?
        > When it comes to animals, will you do anything
        > differently? If so,
        > what? What was your favorite part of today's lesson?
        > Least favorite?
        > Would you like us to visit again? What other
        > animal-related issues
        > would you like to learn about? Compile the survey
        > results to gauge
        > how effective your lesson was at teaching relevant
        > information,
        > changing children's attitudes and perceptions, and
        > engaging their
        > interest. Be sure to thank the teacher for allowing
        > your club to
        > visit.
        >
        > 8. KEEP NOTES. Maintain a notebook of your club's
        > elementary school
        > visits and lessons. Note your survey results, which
        > presentations
        > were effective, and which lessons needed work. That
        > will help you be
        > more effective in the future. As always, let us know
        > about your
        > humane education efforts at humaneteen@.... We
        > may publish your
        > efforts in HumaneTeen. Your story could inspire
        > other high-school
        > students to reach out to young kids in their
        > community!
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >


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      • catwoman
        Brainwashing of kids is one of my biggest pet peeves with this AR movement. They get kids to put their futures on the line demonstrating and committing crimes.
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 8, 2006
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          Brainwashing of kids is one of my biggest pet peeves with this AR movement. They get kids to put their futures on the line demonstrating and committing crimes. They are too young to understand the consequences they are facing. It's hard enough succeeding in a competitive world without starting with a police record. I'm glad my grandkids are home schooled and out of the reach of PeTA propaganda.

          Catwoman

          defend_peta <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
          HUMANE TEEN

          TEACH KIDS TO CARE ABOUT ANIMALS

          Go to to http://tinyurl.com/qolog read online

          Go to http://tinyurl.com/ekhpr to protect animals

          Animal suffering is all too common in our society. Yet so many of its
          causes—puppy mills, circuses, greyhounds, pet overpopulation—can be
          eliminated through humane education that teaches people at an early
          age to care about and make better decisions for animals. If you or
          your animal protection club would like to reach out to elementary-
          school kids in your community, here are some ideas for starting a
          humane education program.

          1. WHAT'S IMPORTANT? Decide what issues you'd like to teach younger
          children about. For children in grades K-4, appropriate topics
          include proper pet care, dog bite prevention, and respect for
          wildlife and habitats. Children in grades 5-6 may be able to handle
          issues such as pet overpopulation, the connection between puppy mills
          and pet stores, and events that exploit animals, such as greyhound
          racing and circuses. You may also wish to explore http://www.hsus.org
          for topic ideas.

          2. GET IN TOUCH. Before you invest time or money into your project,
          contact the elementary-school teacher(s) whose classes you'd like to
          work with. Explain who you are and the specific topics you'd like to
          teach. Most people will be open to lessons on proper pet care and dog
          bite prevention, but some may be reluctant to introduce topics that
          may be controversial or upsetting to children, such as the problems
          of circuses or pet overpopulation. Keep an open mind and realize that
          any humane message you can get through to kids is better than none at
          all.

          3. KNOW YOUR STUFF. Research whatever issue(s) you'd like to educate
          kids about. Visit reliable, up-to-date websites and contact reputable
          organizations for information. A list of good websites may be found
          on HumaneTeen in the "Recommended Links" (http://tinyurl.com/najj8)
          section.

          4. GET THE GOODS. You'll need a plan and materials. Decide how you'd
          like to approach kids about the humane issues you've selected. Don't
          rely on just standing up before the class and lecturing. Engage the
          students with interactive, age-appropriate materials and activities.
          For example, you may wish to put on a puppet show about proper pet
          care, give a demonstration with plush animals about staying safe
          around dogs, or provide students with coloring pages or worksheets.
          Run your ideas by your club's adult advisor for input. If an
          elementary-school teacher is available, ask him or her to go over
          your lesson plans and offer advice.

          If you don't wish to develop your own materials, you may wish to
          purchase humane education materials from the National Association for
          Humane and Environmental Education (NAHEE), youth education division
          of The Humane Society of the United States. In addition to publishing
          HumaneTeen, NAHEE also provides effective, high quality publications
          and programs to teachers, students, and animal sheltering
          professionals. The materials are fairly inexpensive and easy to use.
          Items of particular use to high-school students wishing to teach
          younger students about animal issues include the BARK Dog Bite
          Prevention Program, KIND Teacher, Critters with Character, Color Me
          KIND coloring books, and KIND News. To learn more about these
          materials or to order online, please visit
          http://www.nahee.org/shoppingcart. For more information about how
          your club could use these to reach elementary school students in your
          area, please e-mail nahee@... or call (860) 434-8666.

          5. GIVE A CALL. Arrange a day and time for your club to visit the
          elementary school. Make sure this is a convenient time for the
          teacher whose class you're visiting. Check with your adult advisor or
          school counselor to see if you can go during your school hours or as
          part of a service-learning requirement. Many high schools release
          students well before elementary schools do, so you may be able to
          visit the classroom once you get out of school.

          6. BE PREPARED. The key to a successful presentation is preparation.
          Practice your presentation before friends, relatives, or club
          members. Make sure you have all the materials you will need. For
          example, if you are distributing worksheets or coloring pages, make
          sure that you have made enough copies for each student; if you're
          bringing a video, make sure the classroom has a VCR.

          7. HAVE FUN—AND FOLLOW UP! During and after your presentation, be
          sure to let kids ask questions about you, your club, and the lesson
          you presented. You may wish to follow up your lesson by distributing
          a survey. Survey questions could include: What did you learn today?
          When it comes to animals, will you do anything differently? If so,
          what? What was your favorite part of today's lesson? Least favorite?
          Would you like us to visit again? What other animal-related issues
          would you like to learn about? Compile the survey results to gauge
          how effective your lesson was at teaching relevant information,
          changing children's attitudes and perceptions, and engaging their
          interest. Be sure to thank the teacher for allowing your club to
          visit.

          8. KEEP NOTES. Maintain a notebook of your club's elementary school
          visits and lessons. Note your survey results, which presentations
          were effective, and which lessons needed work. That will help you be
          more effective in the future. As always, let us know about your
          humane education efforts at humaneteen@.... We may publish your
          efforts in HumaneTeen. Your story could inspire other high-school
          students to reach out to young kids in their community!






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