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Re: Mythmaking and "science" p.II.

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  • bri_mue
    The second quote regarding the Mysteries is from Donald Kagan (I forgot to mention that), famous contemporary historian and author of the The Heritage of
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 8, 2002
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      The second quote regarding the "Mysteries" is from Donald Kagan (I
      forgot to mention that),
      famous contemporary historian and author of the "The Heritage of
      World Civilization" books, writes in "Stealing History":

      "The story of how the myth of a Greek appropriation of Egyptian
      philosophy reached the twentieth century is more curious. At the base
      of the modern version is the assumption that from early times there
      was such a thing as an "Egyptian Mystery System," which is
      what is supposed to have led the Greeks to come to Egypt to study and
      which they stole and presented as Greek philosophy. For this there is
      no acceptable evidence.

      The greatest influence of this invented Egypt came through its
      adoption in the eighteenth century by the Freemasons. Their version
      assumed not only the existence of an Egyptian Mystery System but one
      that was connected to a great system of moral education. The source
      for these notions was entirely fictional, a three-volume novel called
      Sethos, a History or Biography, based on Unpublished Memoirs of
      Ancient Egypt, published in 1731 by a French priest, the Abbé Jean
      Terrasson. Following the ancient convention, the author pretends to
      be translating an unknown manuscript written by an unknown Greek of
      the second century A.D. Ostensibly describing the Egypt of the
      thirteenth century B.C., Terrasson depicts a world of advanced
      science, technology, art, law, and educational institutions such as
      would delight the imagination of a forward-looking eighteenth-century
      European gentleman. Access to it requires the comprehension of a
      complex system of mysteries prepared for by study, moral
      purification, and entered by means of a mystical initiation ceremony.

      Father Terrasson's novel became very popular and powerfully
      shaped the beliefs, practices, and rituals of the Masonic movement,
      whose reliance on a mythical, mystical, Egyptian tradition is perhaps
      most widely known in its depiction by Mozart in his Magic Flute. This
      picture of ancient Egypt was soon forgotten by everyone else and,
      before long, totally discredited by the discoveries of scientific
      Egyptology. It remained, however, the one preserved among the
      Masons."

      What made me a bit uneasy quoting this is that it is taken from a
      afrocentism debate. On the other hand he is a leading authority
      regarding this historical period, so that make his remark indeed of
      value and uncovers another, the "Mysterie tradition" falacy ?

      So is it not true after all that Plato learned "all" of his
      philosophy the books by Hermes Trismegistus and since most such works
      could have been destroyed in the burning of the Alexandrian Library.
      However that copies of those ancient books were still available in
      some secret occultist's library in the Himalayas. And therefore it
      would be difficult to prove that HPB was inacurate about that, or
      that she didn't have evidence that such books did exist
      during the time of Plato ?

      Bri.
      --- In theos-talk@y..., "bri_mue" <bri_mue@y...> wrote:
      > As an example how the kind of pseudo-history mythmaking present
      among
      > Theosophists at times can also be found elsewhere, I bring here
      > something an acquaintance of mine send me as an example how even
      the
      > recent research of the Cambay coast in India is emediatly being
      > misappropriated and used within a form of pseudo-historiography
      > typical also for Theosophy (see my previous postings on this
      > subject),even if in this case not identical to Theosophical
      > historiography.
      >
      > "Therefore, any cyclical reappearance of civilisation and the
      > Caucasian race could manifest from at least two points, which span
      > the length of the Aryan presence on our Earth, from top to bottom.
      > The Caucasian presence on the steppes of Siberia could be explained
      > by migration from the polar opening, deemed to be situated above the
      > New Siberian Islands in the Arctic basin, while openings in the
      > Tibetan region could account for Caucasian presence also, even down
      > on into the Indian subcontinent.
      >
      > No Caucasian migration on the surface of the Earth is necessarily
      > indicative of an introduction of Vedic culture. Aryan insertion into
      > any given area could have simply reinforced already existent Vedic
      > culture without having been an introduction.
      >
      > The hollow Earth theory certainly strenghtens the Puranic account of
      > a cyclical, re-population of the surface of our planet from the
      > madhyatah, the hollow portion, including its chief city Shambhalla,
      > and suggests that what is past will one day be prologue.
      > It remained, however, the one preserved among the In this way, the
      > hollow Earth theory offers an intriguing alternative
      > to previous interpretations of the Caucasian presence in India,
      > otherwise known as the Aryan Invasion Theory.
      >
      > http://skywebsite.com/hollow/Vedic-Hollow-Earth/id2.html
      >
      > With the new discoveries of sunken archaeology off the coast of
      > India, above Gujarat, we also have to seriously consider the idea of
      > a cloud canopy like Venus has. If it fell ( 40 days and 40
      nights? ),
      > this would accountfromcitiesabove sealevel findingthemselves
      > underwater.
      >
      > The Mahabharat war was more severe than depicted in the Mahabharat
      > and Puranas. There is hardly any delineation of the after effects,
      > which we can take as a hint." (end quote)
      >
      >
      > Bri.
      >
      > "The story of how the myth of a Greek appropriation of Egyptian
      > philosophy reached the twentieth century is more curious. At the
      base
      > of the modern version is the assumption that from early times there
      > was such a thing as an "Egyptian Mystery System," which is
      > what is supposed to have led the Greeks to come to Egypt to study
      and
      > which they stole and presented as Greek philosophy. For this there
      is
      > no acceptable evidence.
      >
      > The greatest influence of this invented Egypt came through its
      > adoption in the eighteenth century by the Freemasons. Their version
      > assumed not only the existence of an Egyptian Mystery System but
      one
      > that was connected to a great system of moral education. The source
      > for these notions was entirely fictional, a three-volume novel
      called
      > Sethos, a History or Biography, based on Unpublished Memoirs of
      > Ancient Egypt, published in 1731 by a French priest, the Abbé
      Jean
      > Terrasson. Following the ancient convention, the author pretends to
      > be translating an unknown manuscript written by an unknown Greek of
      > the second century A.D. Ostensibly describing the Egypt of the
      > thirteenth century B.C., Terrasson depicts a world of advanced
      > science, technology, art, law, and educational institutions such as
      > would delight the imagination of a forward-looking eighteenth-
      century
      > European gentleman. Access to it requires the comprehension of a
      > complex system of mysteries prepared for by study, moral
      > purification, and entered by means of a mystical initiation
      ceremony.
      >
      > Father Terrasson's novel became very popular and powerfully
      > shaped the beliefs, practices, and rituals of the Masonic movement,
      > whose reliance on a mythical, mystical, Egyptian tradition is
      perhaps
      > most widely known in its depiction by Mozart in his Magic Flute.
      This
      > picture of ancient Egypt was soon forgotten by everyone else and,
      > before long, totally discredited by the discoveries of scientific
      > Egyptology.
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