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Cup & Saucer found "in undisturbed ground and surrounded by thick roots"

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  • Daniel Caldwell
    A. P. Sinnett wrote: If the phenomenon was not what it appeared to be—a most wonderful display of a power of which the modern scientific world has no
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 8, 2002
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      A. P. Sinnett wrote:

      "If the phenomenon was not what it appeared to be�a
      most wonderful display of a power of which the modern
      scientific world has no comprehension whatever�it was,
      of course, an elaborate fraud. That supposition will
      only bear to be talked of vaguely. The cup and saucer
      were assuredly dug up in the way I describe. If they
      were not deposited there by occult agency, they must
      have been buried there beforehand. Now, I have
      described the character of the ground from which they
      were dug up; assuredly that had been undisturbed for
      years by the character of the vegetation upon it. But
      it may be urged that from some other part of the
      sloping ground a sort of tunnel may have been
      excavated in the first instance through which the cup
      and saucer could have been thrust into the place where
      they were found. If the tunnel had been big enough for
      the purpose, it would have left traces, which were not
      perceptible on the ground�which were not even
      discoverable when the ground was searched shortly
      afterwards [by Mr. Henderson and Judge M.] with a view
      to that hypothesis .
      . . .[Mr. Henderson]. . . afterwards changed
      his mind about the satisfactory character of the cup
      phenomenon, and said he thought it vitiated as a
      scientific proof by the interposition of the theory
      that the cup and saucer MIGHT HAVE BEEN thrust up into
      their places by means of a tunnel cut from a lower
      part of the bank. I have discussed that hypothesis
      already, and mention the fact of [Mr. Henderson�s]
      change of opinion, which does not affect any of the
      circumstances I have narrated, merely to avoid the
      chance that readers might think I was treating the
      change of opinion in question as something which it
      was worth while to disguise." Caps added
      Quoted from:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/UniversalSeekers/message/3035

      Notice the reference to Henderson's
      "possibility/plausibility" argument [a
      Step 2 argument]. But Henderson and Judge M. found no
      evidence [step 3] of any "tunnel". No evidence was
      ever brought forward to show how the "fraud" was
      committed.

      Compare the above to Olcott's account:

      "She [Blavatsky] consented; and, looking about the
      ground here and there, finally called Major Henderson
      to bring a knife and dig in a spot she pointed to. He
      found the ground hard and full of small roots of a
      young cedar tree near by. These he cut through and
      pulled up to a depth of say 6 inches, when something
      white was seen in the black soil; it was dug out, and
      lo! a cup decorated in green and gold, exactly
      matching the others Mrs. Sinnett's servants had
      brought. Madame told the Major to dig more; he did
      so, and at last found a saucer to match the cup! They
      were imbedded in the ground like stones naturally
      there, and the cedar roots grew all around them
      like a net work, and one root as large as your little
      finger had to be cut away to get at the saucer."

      Quoted from:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/UniversalSeekers/message/2930

      Compare also the above with one of Henderson's replies
      in the newspaper:

      ". . . I am not a theosophist, nor a believer in the
      phenomena of theosophy, which I entirely discredit. .
      . ."

      Here was Henderson's chance to give evidence [step
      3]that would show fraud in the cup and saucer incident
      but nothing was given.

      Quoted from:
      http://www.blavatskyarchives.com/henderson1880.htm

      Daniel H. Caldwell
      BLAVATSKY ARCHIVES
      http://blavatskyarchives.com/introduction.htm
      "...Contrast alone can enable us to appreciate things
      at their right value; and unless a judge compares
      notes and hears both sides he can hardly come to a
      correct decision."
      H.P. Blavatsky. The Theosophist, July, 1881, p. 218.


      =====
      Daniel H. Caldwell
      BLAVATSKY ARCHIVES
      http://blavatskyarchives.com/introduction.htm
      "...Contrast alone can enable us to appreciate things at
      their right value; and unless a judge compares notes and
      hears both sides he can hardly come to a correct decision."
      H.P. Blavatsky. The Theosophist, July, 1881, p. 218.

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