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The work named - Bodhi-mur in the SD

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  • M. Sufilight
    Dear friends My views are: Some has researched the word or term Bodhi-mur in the Secret Doctrine, seeking to find out which religious book or reference was
    Message 1 of 1 , May 26 7:00 AM
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      Dear friends

      My views are:


      Some has researched the word or term "Bodhi-mur" in the Secret Doctrine, seeking to find out which religious book or reference was meant by Blavatsky.

      Jataka tales
      (There are much info about the Jataka tales in libraries around the world. Much has been written about them. Also the Valahassa Jataka.)
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jataka_tales

      VALAHASSA JATAKA
      (Perhaps better: The Jataka Tales - story of the former birth of Buddha. Valahassa Jataka - The story of Flying White Horse)
      "IN the History of Tibet called Rgyal-rabs-gsal-vai-me-lo"n ('The mirror illustrating the lineage of the kings') we find, as sixth chapter, the tale translated here, which corresponds to the Valahassa Jataka (Fausboll, ii. 127 ff., also in E. Muller's Pali Grammar, p. 128 ff.). As will be seen, the tale appears here in a richer, and quasi-dramatic, garb, with the addition of some characteristic traits, as e.g. the marvellous food that makes men forget their bygone troubles (cp. Odyssey, ix. 94 f.), etc., etc.

      The Rgyal-rabs itself is a work of the 17th century A.D. It begins with the evolution of the universe (in chapter 1, cp. Rockhill, Life of the Buddha, p. 1 ff.), gives, in ch. 2, a short survey of the Lord's life, and, in ch. 3 and 4, of the beginnings of Buddhism, relates, in ch. 5, the merits of Avalokitecvara in spreading the Law in Tibet, and goes then, ch. 6, on to our tale. Follows the origin of the Tibetan race from an ape and a rakshasi (ch. 7), the beginning of the royal line (ch. 8), finally, the chief contents and purpose of the book, life and doings of King Sro"n-btsan sgam-po (ch. 9-17), whereon the book closes with a sort of appendix containing the further history of the country to the time of the writer.

      The work has been partially known for a long time by the extracts from the Mongolian translation thereof, called Bodhimor, given in the notes to I. J. Schmidt's edition of the Mongolian historian Ssanang Ssetzen. For my copy of the work I had the use of two blockprints, one belonging formerly to Mr. Jäschke, now in the British Museum; the other of the University Library of St. Petersburg, p. 504 25181 (569), for which latter I am indebted to the kindness of Mr. Saleman. The first is pretty correct, the other gives a few different readings, and has a peculiar, not to say faulty, spelling."
      http://www.sacred-texts.com/journals/jras/ns20-14.htm

      Mongolian translations of VALAHASSA JATAKA is called "Bodhimor".
      This work is written in a poetic language in quite a number of versions.

      It is perhaps also in such works of Buddhism that some of Blavatsky's references to the term Fohat in chinese might be found.
      Fohat is the steed, thought is the Rider. And maybe we have a clue to the many folklore tales in China and elsewhere using the white horse as more than one thing, - and perhaps also the term Fohat included.
      And we remember that Blavatsky said that allegorical texts are more esoterical in nature. But the scholars keep insisting on that systematic treatises are more esoterical or intelligent. Laughs.

      When scholars are willing to exchange upon allegorical tales on religious-philosophy - accepting the possible existences of the ABJD scheme and perhaps even 7 keys to the mystery language - in stead of merely calling them nonsense, almost like Mr. Moksh Moller (Max Muller) did in the 19th century, we might make som progress on our planet.


      ________

      There is a link to a paper on the Jataka tales here in Taiwan:
      (Jataka Ta l e s in Comparative Perspective

      The Evolution of Tales of
      the Buddha's Past Lives
      (Another relevant case would be the tale of a flying horse that saves a group of ship-wrecked merchants from being devoured by ogresses, which in the
      Madhyama-agama is explicitly qualified as a simile.21 A version of this tale in an Udana collection preserved in Chinese al so does not take the form of a
      jataka 22 Yet, in the Pali Jataka collection, as well as in a discourse in the Ekottarika-agama, this story records a previous life of the Buddha.23 The same is the case for several other versions of this tale, which differ, however, on whether the flying horse or the leader of the group of merchants should be identified with the bodhisattva. 24)
      http://www.fuyan.org.tw/download/FBS_vol7-2.pdf)



      ______________________________

      I will in the below add some words from a previous post, because - the White Horse theme - seem to be interesting in this respect.

      The Secret Doctrine Vol. I, p. 32, 70-71 + 136 and onwards:

      STANZA VI.

      1. BY THE POWER OF THE MOTHER OF MERCY AND KNOWLEDGE - KWAN-YIN - THE "TRIPLE" OF KWAN-SHAI-YIN, RESIDING IN KWAN-YIN-TIEN, FOHAT, THE BREATH OF THEIR PROGENY, THE SON OF THE SONS, HAVING CALLED FORTH, FROM THE LOWER ABYSS (chaos), THE ILLUSIVE FORM OF SIEN-TCHANG (our Universe) AND THE SEVEN ELEMENTS: *

      2. THE SWIFT AND RADIANT ONE PRODUCES THE SEVEN LAYA CENTRES, AGAINST WHICH NONE WILL PREVAIL TO THE GREAT DAY "BE-WITH-US," AND SEATS THE UNIVERSE ON THESE ETERNAL FOUNDATIONS SURROUNDING TSIEN-TCHAN WITH THE ELEMENTARY GERMS.

      3. OF THE SEVEN (elements)-FIRST ONE MANIFESTED, SIX CONCEALED, TWO MANIFESTED, FIVE CONCEALED; THREE MANIFESTED, FOUR CONCEALED; FOUR PRODUCED, THREE HIDDEN; FOUR AND ONE TSAN (fraction)REVEALED, TWO AND ONE HALF CONCEALED; SIX TO BE MANIFESTED, ONE LAID ASIDE. LASTLY, SEVEN SMALL WHEELS REVOLVING; ONE GIVING BIRTH TO THE OTHER.

      ------------------------------
      * Verse 1 of Stanza VI. is of a far later date than the other Stanzas, though still very ancient. The old text of this verse, having names entirely unknown to the Orientalists would give no clue to the student."
      http://www.phx-ult-lodge.org/SDVolume_I.htm
      (The rest of this Stanza aught perhaps to be read as well as the commentaries to it so to better understand the following...Italics and bold are included in the online versions. Here are some PDF versions of the Secret Doctrine down the page: http://blavatskyarchives.com/theosophypdfs/early_theosophical_publications.htm)

      See also the comment by Blavatsky to the same verse on page 136, STANZA VI. verse 1:
      "* This stanza is translated from the Chinese text, and the names, as the equivalents of the original terms, are preserved. The real esoteric nomenclature cannot be given, as it would only confuse the reader. The Brahmanical doctrine has no equivalent to these. Vach seems, in many an aspect, to approach the Chinese Kwan-yin, but there is no regular worship of Vâch under this name in India, as there is of Kwan-Yin in China. No exoteric religious system has ever adopted a female Creator, and thus woman was regarded and treated, from the first dawn of popular religions, as inferior to man. It is only in China and Egypt that Kwan-Yin and Isis were placed on a par with the male gods. Esotericism ignores both sexes. Its highest Deity is sexless as it is formless, neither Father nor Mother; and its first manifested beings, celestial and terrestrial alike, become only gradually androgynous and finally separate into distinct sexes."
      http://www.phx-ult-lodge.org/SDVolume_I.htm
      (That is why some of us, reject some religious systems of various kinds.)



      M. Sufilight says:
      Now, the above quote from Dzyan Stanzas in the SD sound almost like a fairytale to some readers. What Blavatsky actually are trying to reveal or forward are being referred to in the later pages of the book and here SD. Vol. I, p. 22.
      I have in the above added various words in parenthesis, which can be found later in the book by Blavatsky, when she write the commentaries to each verse.
      The reason why I am quoting these passages is, that in it I found some interesting clues.
      One clue is the word or term "Kwan-Yin" and the fact that Blavatsky in the above footnote is saying that she here is quoting a NEWER version - which parallels the ancient Senzar manuscript she was writting the Secret Doctrine from.
      (The original Dzyan Stanzas manuscript with very very ancient commentaries and a glossary - a special ESOTERIC version of the Kalachakra Tantra, different in content no doubt, was according to Blavatsky in the possesion of the Panchen Lama at Tashi Lunpho in Shigatse Tibet in the 1870-ties or so. - See BCW, Vol. XIV, p. 422-424 - http://www.katinkahesselink.net/blavatsky/articles/v14/mb_007.htm)

      The question which came naturally was, whether there existed an earlier version of "Kwan-Yin", the female goddess in Tibet in ancient times?

      I found out that there indeed did exist such a goddess. This goddess was named Xi Wang-Mu or Wangmu. And she is considered very old by science and by the Chinese themselves.
      And since this Wangmu as a Kuan-Yin if we follow Blavatsky's Stanza is a triple Logos - male and female according to Blavatsky, she is - in one of her three aspects - as the case might be - also what we called Fohat, the (feminine) Light of Logos (the male). Fohat (the propelling force of life as such) is the steed and thought is the Rider, said Blavatsky in the Stanzas. This can be seen in SD, Vol. I, on the pages 136-137 and as the Vaikhari-Vach in the Vedas on page 138, also page 81 - But Vach is not worshipped in India like in Tibet and China says Blavatsky (!), page 136. ("Kwan-Yin are synonymous with fire and water", - Transaction of the Blavatsky Lodge, p. 117) Kwan-Yin is the mother, wife, and daughter to the Logos as the case might be says Blavatsky. Further it is known that Kwan-yin is given as the Yin-aspect in Daoism (Taoism) by historical research.
      Now if all these here mentioned view points are true, as I think it is - let us have this carefully in mind in the following........

      Tracing Kwan-Yin to Wangmu (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xi_Wangmu) comparatively is easily done. Yet, the evidence shown of their - spiritual - identity can however always be opposed. The Yu the Great - Emperor of China (d. 2207 BCE says Blavatsky in BCW, Vol. III, p. 418) meet Wangmu according to the ancient papers. And she is in those papers and many others often referred to as having her residence in the Kunlun mountains to the West, (compared with Eastern China). Some trace the location to the far western range of Kunlun Mountains - and to the Pamir Mountains, others to the Northern range of Altyn-Tagh. And at the time of emperor Yu the Great 2.200 BC - we find that there was a great culture in the Tamrim region, where science more recently has found the Urumchi mummies and other traces of rather "advanced" of cultures, (also referred to by Blavatsky and the archaeologist Stein). Elsewhere on the planet at that time, only a bit further to the West, we known that there existed a culture named the Harappa culture in the Indus-Valley, often dated to 2.600-1.900 BCE by science, and sometimes as far back as 3.500 BCE or a bit more. This culture was not small. It has been traced by present day science to cover an area from Punjab to Kashmir in India - and even more Eastern - to - the city Balkh and possibly Iraq in the West - including the ancient, spiritual centre, the city Taxila, near present day Pesheawar (where Aryasanga, known as Asanga was said to be born, and where he and others created the Mahayana Yogacara Buddhist school, although early Mahayana Buddhism was there in 349 BC says Gelugpa records.). The Harappa
      culture was very advanced for its time and had flush-toilets and other "advanced" technology compared to other cultures at its own time. (See for instance here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harrappa - and - toilets here - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flush_toilet - ) The Indus Valley culture at Mohenjo-daro had a female religious emphasis.

      >>> Xi Wangmu, the shamanic great goddess of China <<<
      "One of the oldest deities of China is Xi Wangmu (Hsi Wang Mu). She lives in the Kunlun mountains in the far west, at the margin of heaven and earth. In a garden hidden by high clouds, her peaches of immortality grow on a colossal Tree, only ripening once every 3000 years. The Tree is a cosmic axis that connects heaven and earth, a ladder traveled by spirits and shamans.

      Xi Wang Mu controls the cosmic forces: time and space and the pivotal Great Dipper constellation. With her powers of creation and destruction, she ordains life and death, disease and healing, and determines the life spans of all living beings. The energies of new growth surround her like a cloud. She is attended by hosts of spirits and transcendentals. She presides over the dead and afterlife, and confers divine realization and immortality on spiritual seekers. "
      .......
      "The magical fox, hare, frog, crow, and humans attend her in a tomb tile at Xinfan, Sichuan. The tomb art of this province shows the goddess of transcendence seated in majesty on a dragon and tiger throne. [Liu, 40-3] This magical pair goes back to the Banpo neolithic, circa 5000 BCE, where they flank a burial at Xishuipo, Henan. [Rawson, 244] Tiger and dragon represented yin and yang before the familiar Tai Ji symbol came into use during the middle ages."
      http://www.suppressedhistories.net/goddess/xiwangmu.html

      Since she also is an expression of Fohat, this word must be able to be found in the Chinese Buddhist Literature:
      "FOHAT IS THE STEED AND THE THOUGHT IS THE RIDER"
      .......
      " the female Logos, so to speak, the goddess of the active forces in Nature, the Word, Voice or Sound, and Speech."
      .......
      " It is called in several Buddhist books Fohat. It is the one instrument with which the Logos works."
      (SD, Vol. I, p. 31 + 137, footnote, quoting T. Subba Row in the above.)
      http://www.phx-ult-lodge.org/SDVolume_I.htm
      (Maybe searching for a White Horse in ancient Buddhist literature will reveal Fohat is there. Or terms like water or fire, or merely Guanyin also known as Avalokitesvara, and Fohat in one of her triple forms or aspects.)


      The above are just my views. I forwarded them so that they might help some of the readers of them.



      M. Sufilight


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