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    This was posted to alt.religion.christian,alt.religion.christian-teen,alt.christnet,alt.rel igion.christian.roman-catholic By Dan Fake - I thought it is of
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 11, 2001
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      This was posted to
      alt.religion.christian,alt.religion.christian-teen,alt.christnet,alt.rel
      igion.christian.roman-catholic

      By Dan Fake - I thought it is of interest given the second object.....
      (don't be shy people...discussion is good ;) )



      Thanks to posts in alt.atheism and talk.philosophy.humanism,
      I discovered the following book, recently published, which
      offers a vivid and focused explanation for the naturalistic
      processes involved in the origins and progression of religion
      in human societies across the globe, from the perspective of
      cultural anthropology ...

      Anthropology, Cultural
      http://www.britannica.com/eb/article?eu=117536

      Religion Explained,
      by Pascal Boyer
      Hardcover - 300 pages (May 22, 2001)
      Basic Books; ISBN: 0465006957 ;
      Dimensions (in inches): 1.33 x 9.52 x 6.49

      http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0465006957

      Review from Library Journal:

      "Utilizing cross-cultural studies and a multidisciplinary
      approach, anthropologist Boyer (Luce Professor of
      Collective Memory and Individual Memory, Washington
      Univ.) argues that the origin, development, and diversity
      of religion are scientifically explainable within the naturalistic
      frameworks of evolutionary biology and cognitive psychol-
      ogy.

      His point of departure is the complex human brain and its
      mental activity, both being a result of natural selection
      enhancing the adaptation, survival, and reproductive suc-
      cess of our social ancestors through over four million years
      of hominid evolution.

      Boyer focuses on the inference systems and intuitive expec-
      tations of evolved human brain capacities to account for
      the biocultural origin of religious concepts and supernatural
      agents (e.g., gods, ghosts, demons, spirits, and witches).

      He is to be commended for his scholarly and critical examin-
      ation of religion. Some readers may find his arguments difficult
      to follow and to accept, but this is nevertheless a significant
      contribution to anthropology. Especially recommended for
      academic libraries. H. James Birx, Canisius Coll., Buffalo, NY
      Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc."

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      -Dan Fake, Pro-Humanist FREELOVER
      http://home.att.net/~danfake
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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