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Re: Sex In The City - Brooksie style!

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  • nutsaboutclara
    Sex In The City? I wonder who s the Einstein who came up that stupid comparision? -Dario. ... finally
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 9, 2006
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      "Sex In The City?" I wonder who's the "Einstein" who came up that
      stupid comparision?

      -Dario.


      --- In thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com, olive_e_thomas
      <no_reply@...> wrote:
      >
      > From...
      >
      > http://www.filmforum.org/films/pandorasbox.html
      >
      > Sex in the City Ñ Berlin, 1928: in the wake of Louise BrooksÕs
      > patent leather bobbed Lulu, men set up expensive love nests,
      > get caught in embarrassing public situations, break prestigious
      > engagements, demand and commit suicides, engineer escapes
      > from the law, ruin themselves gambling, commit brutal murders
      > and join the Salvation Army; as she moves from kept woman,
      > headlining showgirl, lesbianÕs love interest, widow in mourning,
      > convicted criminal, fugitive from the law, possible sex slave to
      > common streetwalker; amid a bustling backdrop of life in
      > Weimar Germany including the sleekest of apartments, the most
      > frantic backstages (Òfor sheer erotic dynamism, the backstage
      > scenes have never been equaledÓ Ð Pauline Kael), the sleaziest
      > bars and the most decrepit attic hovels.
      >
      > But through it all she preserves a simple innocence, as a being
      > devoted solely to pleasure without maliceÑthe author of the
      > original plays, Franz Wedekind, eyebrow-raiser of the Victorian
      > 90s, called Lola Òthe personification of primitive sexuality who
      > inspires evil unaware.Ó (But then Brooks herself later noted that,
      > as an ex-Ziegfeld girl, ÒIt all seemed perfectly normal to me.Ó)
      > G.W. PabstÕs adaptation combined his fluid, cut-on-movement
      > editing style with the harsh contrasts, lurking shadows and
      > staircases-to-nowhere of German expressionism, plucking
      > Brooks from a waning career as Hollywood flapper to goddess
      > of the European art film.
      >
      > But not right away, as Pandora, a silent film released on the
      > cusp of the talkie revolution, and one greeted by censorship and
      > generally negative reviews, soon became a historical sidebar.
      > Then, following BrooksÕs rediscovery in the 50s as a bitingly
      > intelligent, wickedly witty woman in real life, PandoraÕs Box
      finally
      > (and deservedly) entered the pantheon as one of the last
      > masterpieces of the cinemaÕs most exciting eraÑwith BrooksÕs
      > creation taking her place as one of the screenÕs most enduring
      > love goddesses.
      >
      > 2006 marks the centennial of Louise Brooks, born in Cherryvale,
      > Kansas, in 1906. A member of Ruth St. DenisÕs modern dance
      > troupe at age 15, she later starred on Broadway in George
      > WhiteÕs Scandals and The Ziegfeld Follies. Signed to a
      > Paramount contract in 1925, she starred in silents directed by
      > Howard Hawks and William Wellman and co-starred with W.C.
      > Fields. But she achieved legendary status with two German films
      > directed by Pabst: PandoraÕs Box and Diary of a Lost Girl.
      > Returning to the U.S. in the early 30s, she was unable to
      > recapture her earlier career and found only minor roles in Poverty
      > Row productions.
      >
      > By the early 40s, Brooks had become reclusive and a hopeless
      > alcoholic, but in the mid-1950s she was re-discovered by a new
      > generation of cinephiles. In 1956 she moved to Rochester, New
      > York, home of George Eastman House (where many of her films
      > have been preserved, including Pandora) and began to write
      > about film history with a perception that only a Hollywood insider
      > could have. Some of her best essays were collected in the book
      > Lulu in Hollywood, first published in 1974 and still in print. She
      > died in 1985.
      >
    • Harry Kollatz
      Brooksians: Clara, did you mean Eisenstein, instead? Yeah, I thought that Sex In The City noise was off thematically and besides the point, but I guess
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 9, 2006
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        Re: Sex In The City - Brooksie style!
          Brooksians:

            Clara, did you mean Eisenstein, instead? Yeah, I thought that "Sex In The City" noise was off thematically and besides the point, but I guess they're trying to appeal to demographic that may never have heard of Louise Brooks. And sex sells. And Louise is sexy. And elements of Pandora are certainly erotic. And it is mostly set in a city.

           I'm tempted to go see it, but we did a screening here at the Byrd Theatre, a 1928 movie palace, with live music accompaniment. And it was grand.

           Still, to see it in New York with a New York audience would be cool.

          --HEK
      • olive_e_thomas
        I ve had the movie since the 1980s, buying even though we didn t have a VCR in the house at the time. Would love to see it on the big screen at our local old
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 9, 2006
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          I've had the movie since the 1980s, buying even though we didn't
          have a VCR in the house at the time. Would love to see it on the
          big screen at our local old movie palace...

          --- In thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com, Harry
          Kollatz <harryk@...> wrote:
          I'm tempted to go see it, but we did a screening here at the
          Byrd
          > Theatre, a 1928 movie palace, with live music accompaniment.
          And it was
          > grand.
          >
          > Still, to see it in New York with a New York audience would be
          cool.
          >
          > --HEK
          >
        • nutsaboutclara
          No, Einstein, not Eisenstein. -Dario. ... that Sex In ... guess ... of Louise ... are ... was ... cool.
          Message 4 of 7 , Jun 12, 2006
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            No, Einstein, not Eisenstein.

            -Dario.


            --- In thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com, Harry Kollatz
            <harryk@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > Brooksians:
            >
            > Clara, did you mean Eisenstein, instead? Yeah, I thought
            that "Sex In
            > The City" noise was off thematically and besides the point, but I
            guess
            > they're trying to appeal to demographic that may never have heard
            of Louise
            > Brooks. And sex sells. And Louise is sexy. And elements of Pandora
            are
            > certainly erotic. And it is mostly set in a city.
            >
            > I'm tempted to go see it, but we did a screening here at the Byrd
            > Theatre, a 1928 movie palace, with live music accompaniment. And it
            was
            > grand.
            >
            > Still, to see it in New York with a New York audience would be
            cool.
            >
            > --HEK
            >
          • nutsaboutclara
            Olive, if you ever get to watch PANDORA S BOX(1929)on the big screen, you ll won t be disappointed. The very first time I saw PANDORA S BOX on the big screen
            Message 5 of 7 , Jun 12, 2006
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              Olive, if you ever get to watch PANDORA'S BOX(1929)on the big screen,
              you'll won't be disappointed. The very first time I saw PANDORA'S
              BOX on the big screen was back 11 years ago this coming Wednesday.
              In fact, Francis Lederer was the guest speaker after the film was
              shown. Boy, what a treat that was to see the last surviving member
              of PANDORA'S BOX speak before an SRO crowd!

              -Dario.


              --- In thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com, olive_e_thomas
              <no_reply@...> wrote:
              >
              > I've had the movie since the 1980s, buying even though we didn't
              > have a VCR in the house at the time. Would love to see it on the
              > big screen at our local old movie palace...
              >
              > --- In thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com, Harry
              > Kollatz <harryk@> wrote:
              > I'm tempted to go see it, but we did a screening here at the
              > Byrd
              > > Theatre, a 1928 movie palace, with live music accompaniment.
              > And it was
              > > grand.
              > >
              > > Still, to see it in New York with a New York audience would be
              > cool.
              > >
              > > --HEK
              > >
              >
            • Harry Kollatz
              Dario and Brooksians: Wow, actually seeing and hearing Francis Lederer -- now that s an experience. And Olive, having a video of Pandora s Box before you even
              Message 6 of 7 , Jun 12, 2006
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                Re: Sex In The City - Brooksie style!
                 Dario and Brooksians:

                   Wow, actually seeing and hearing Francis Lederer -- now that's an experience. And Olive, having a video of Pandora's Box before you even possessed a way to see it -- that's devotion. But nothing beats the big screen. Like one of the bandmembers who played for our presentation in Richmond said, "Seeing [Louise] on a television screen was like watching a shadow. But seeing her on the movie screen was like being in her presence." --HEK
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