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Re: [The New Coven of Louise Brooks] Psychological Profile?

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  • olive_e_thomas
    The way I look at it she was more concerned about the loss of personal control. Like if Oprah had tried to put her book in her book club Louise would likely
    Message 1 of 29 , May 5, 2007
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      The way I look at it she was more concerned about the loss of
      personal control. Like if Oprah had tried to put her book in her
      book club Louise would likely refuse on the grounds any
      success would "belong" to Oprah and not to her...
    • Anita M
      I can understand that, and I wouldn’t blame her, either. Anita M. Love is not something wonderful that you feel; it is something difficult that you do. -
      Message 2 of 29 , May 6, 2007
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        I can understand that, and I wouldn’t blame her, either.



        Anita M.



        "Love is not something wonderful that you feel; it is something difficult
        that you do." - Elizabeth Goudge

        _____

        From: thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        olive_e_thomas
        Sent: Saturday, May 05, 2007 10:27 PM
        To: thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [The New Coven of Louise Brooks] Psychological Profile?



        The way I look at it she was more concerned about the loss of
        personal control. Like if Oprah had tried to put her book in her
        book club Louise would likely refuse on the grounds any
        success would "belong" to Oprah and not to her...





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Anita M
        No worries; we know what you meant ;-) Anita M. Love is not something wonderful that you feel; it is something difficult that you do. - Elizabeth Goudge
        Message 3 of 29 , May 6, 2007
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          No worries; we know what you meant ;-)



          Anita M.



          "Love is not something wonderful that you feel; it is something difficult
          that you do." - Elizabeth Goudge

          _____

          From: thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
          nutsaboutclara
          Sent: Saturday, May 05, 2007 11:38 AM
          To: thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [The New Coven of Louise Brooks] Psychological Profile?



          WHOOPS!!!!! I meant "emptiness." Sorry, folks!

          -Dario.

          --- In thenewcovenoflouise
          <mailto:thenewcovenoflouisebrooks%40yahoogroups.com> brooks@yahoogroups.com,
          nutsaboutclara
          <no_reply@...> wrote:
          >
          > I don't think she feared success; I think she hated its intensity
          > more than anything else. Plus, she hated, I think, the empty that
          > accompanies success sometimes. But, that's just a thought of mine.
          >
          > -Dario.
          >
          >
          > --- In thenewcovenoflouise
          <mailto:thenewcovenoflouisebrooks%40yahoogroups.com> brooks@yahoogroups.com,
          "Anita M"
          > <Woodsy@> wrote:
          > >
          > > True, she pretty much said she "raised herself." There are
          several
          > reasons
          > > she didn't want to succeed, some we can guess at and some we'll
          > never know.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > AM
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > _____
          > >
          > > From: thenewcovenoflouise
          <mailto:thenewcovenoflouisebrooks%40yahoogroups.com> brooks@yahoogroups.com
          > > [mailto:thenewcovenoflouise
          <mailto:thenewcovenoflouisebrooks%40yahoogroups.com> brooks@yahoogroups.com]
          On Behalf Of
          > > nutsaboutclara
          > > Sent: Friday, April 27, 2007 12:34 PM
          > > To: thenewcovenoflouise
          <mailto:thenewcovenoflouisebrooks%40yahoogroups.com> brooks@yahoogroups.com
          > > Subject: Re: [The New Coven of Louise Brooks] Psycological
          Profile?
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Yes she was, Jennifer. A fascinating person, indeed. Yes, I agree
          > > with you that Brooksie was a bit afraid of success, but, I think
          > her
          > > troubles were that both of her parents didn't give her enough
          > > attention that they should have to her and her siblings. As
          > Brooksie
          > > herself said one time, just to paraphrase her, her parents were
          > more
          > > in love with each other than with their kids. They prefered that
          > > their childern, or "squaling brats" fend for themselves.
          > >
          > > -Dario.
          > >
          > > --- In thenewcovenoflouise
          > > <mailto:thenewcovenoflouisebrooks%40yahoogroups.com>
          > brooks@yahoogroups. <mailto:brooks%40yahoogroups.com> com,
          > > SMILEYJEN1@
          > > wrote:
          > > >
          > > > She is a most fascinating creature. My own amateur opinion is
          > that
          > > she
          > > > was afraid of success; more specifically, what would happen if
          she
          > > > allowed herself to be happy with it. Think back to Mr Flowers.
          She
          > > > followed a friendly face that promised her pleasant things,
          only
          > to
          > > strip
          > > > her of her childhood in return. This seemed to be a prevailing
          > > theme in
          > > > her life - she would never be complacent again.
          > > >
          > > > Yes, I was a psych minor in college,
          > > > Jennifer ^_^
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > On Thu, 26 Apr 2007 17:56:30 -0000 nutsaboutclara
          > > > <no_reply@yahoogroup <mailto:no_reply%40yahoogroups.com> s.com>
          > writes:
          > > > To the both of you, there has never been a psychological study
          on
          > > > Louise Brooks, because she is virtually unknown to most film
          > > > viewers, especially since most film viewers are NOT silent film
          > > fans
          > > > at all. It's a very tiny community, the silent film viewing
          > > > community, but a very fierce and loyal bunch, to be sure. In
          > fact,
          > > > there are many silent film fans who know ABSOLUTELY NOTHING
          about
          > > > Brooksie, which is a bit shocking.
          > > >
          > > > -Dario.
          > > >
          > > > --- In thenewcovenoflouise
          > > <mailto:thenewcovenoflouisebrooks%40yahoogroups.com>
          > brooks@yahoogroups. <mailto:brooks%40yahoogroups.com> com,
          > > Perri Lee
          > > > <cheaptrickaz@> wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > I don't think she was that complex. She was hot and she knew
          it
          > > > and was a player that fully enjoyed life and refused to take
          > > > negative energy off others.
          > > > >
          > > > > Chuck Golden <bagnoli2@> wrote: Has anyone seen or
          > > > know of any sort of psycological profile on Louise
          > > > > Brooks? I'm in my third straight reading of Barry Paris' bio
          of
          > > > her
          > > > > and I find her to be psycologically baffling. What an
          > incredibly
          > > > > complex person!
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > Perri Lee Leuthard
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > ---------------------------------
          > > > > Ahhh...imagining that irresistible "new car" smell?
          > > > > Check outnew cars at Yahoo! Autos.
          > > > >
          > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          >





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Chuck Golden
          I think you ve hit on one of THE major aspects of her personality. All through the Paris bio, especially towards the end, it s evident that she had to be in
          Message 4 of 29 , May 6, 2007
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            I think you've hit on one of THE major aspects of her personality. All
            through the Paris bio, especially towards the end, it's evident that
            she had to be in control - not so much in control of the people but in
            control of the situation. Ken Tynan wrote the blockbuster piece "The
            Girl in the Black Helmet" for the New Yorker which shot her back to the
            top of the public consciousness. Not long afterwards, she got word
            from him that he'd been out on the West Coast discussing (without her
            knowing it) a bio-pic with a major Hollywood director. She went
            ballistic, refused any thought of letting the film be done (despite the
            increased fame and money), and cut Ken Tynan off forever. She
            excoriated him for having the temerity of discussing a project that
            involved her behind her back. The evident botton line is that she
            wouldn't agree to putting herself and her story in a situation where
            she couldn't be 100% in control of it.

            Now, as to why she was so much that way... any psycologists out there?
            Certainly, she was her mother's daughter and the apple seldom falls far
            from the tree. But she was far too complex for it to be something as
            simple as that.


            --- In thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com, olive_e_thomas
            <no_reply@...> wrote:
            >
            > The way I look at it she was more concerned about the loss of
            > personal control. Like if Oprah had tried to put her book in her
            > book club Louise would likely refuse on the grounds any
            > success would "belong" to Oprah and not to her...
            >
          • Perri Lee
            I have to add one more thing to all of this. I think she did not want to publish her own bio or let anyone else do it because of all the escapades she was
            Message 5 of 29 , May 6, 2007
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              I have to add one more thing to all of this. I think she did not want to publish her own bio or let anyone else do it because of all the escapades she was involved in aka party girl. I think this was also mixed with the twisted religious beliefs of her region and her day. Perri Lee

              Chuck Golden <bagnoli2@...> wrote: I think you've hit on one of THE major aspects of her personality. All
              through the Paris bio, especially towards the end, it's evident that
              she had to be in control - not so much in control of the people but in
              control of the situation. Ken Tynan wrote the blockbuster piece "The
              Girl in the Black Helmet" for the New Yorker which shot her back to the
              top of the public consciousness. Not long afterwards, she got word
              from him that he'd been out on the West Coast discussing (without her
              knowing it) a bio-pic with a major Hollywood director. She went
              ballistic, refused any thought of letting the film be done (despite the
              increased fame and money), and cut Ken Tynan off forever. She
              excoriated him for having the temerity of discussing a project that
              involved her behind her back. The evident botton line is that she
              wouldn't agree to putting herself and her story in a situation where
              she couldn't be 100% in control of it.

              Now, as to why she was so much that way... any psycologists out there?
              Certainly, she was her mother's daughter and the apple seldom falls far
              from the tree. But she was far too complex for it to be something as
              simple as that.

              --- In thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com, olive_e_thomas
              <no_reply@...> wrote:
              >
              > The way I look at it she was more concerned about the loss of
              > personal control. Like if Oprah had tried to put her book in her
              > book club Louise would likely refuse on the grounds any
              > success would "belong" to Oprah and not to her...
              >






              Perri Lee Leuthard



              ---------------------------------
              Don't pick lemons.
              See all the new 2007 cars at Yahoo! Autos.

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Anita M
              I m not sure that public knowledge of her escapades would have bothered her. She never appeared to be embarrassed about anything she did, nor cared what anyone
              Message 6 of 29 , May 7, 2007
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                I'm not sure that public knowledge of her escapades would have bothered her.
                She never appeared to be embarrassed about anything she did, nor cared what
                anyone else thought of her. I think it was a 100% control issue.



                Anita M.

                _____

                From: thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com
                [mailto:thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Perri Lee
                Sent: Sunday, May 06, 2007 1:35 PM
                To: thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [The New Coven of Louise Brooks] Psychological Profile?



                I have to add one more thing to all of this. I think she did not want to
                publish her own bio or let anyone else do it because of all the escapades
                she was involved in aka party girl. I think this was also mixed with the
                twisted religious beliefs of her region and her day. Perri Lee

                Chuck Golden <bagnoli2@yahoo. <mailto:bagnoli2%40yahoo.com> com> wrote: I
                think you've hit on one of THE major aspects of her personality. All through
                the Paris bio, especially towards the end, it's evident that she had to be
                in control - not so much in control of the people but in control of the
                situation. Ken Tynan wrote the blockbuster piece "The Girl in the Black
                Helmet" for the New Yorker which shot her back to the top of the public
                consciousness. Not long afterwards, she got word from him that he'd been out
                on the West Coast discussing (without her knowing it) a bio-pic with a major
                Hollywood director. She went ballistic, refused any thought of letting the
                film be done (despite the increased fame and money), and cut Ken Tynan off
                forever. She excoriated him for having the temerity of discussing a project
                that involved her behind her back. The evident botton line is that she
                wouldn't agree to putting herself and her story in a situation where she
                couldn't be 100% in control of it.

                Now, as to why she was so much that way... any psycologists out there?
                Certainly, she was her mother's daughter and the apple seldom falls far from
                the tree. But she was far too complex for it to be something as simple as
                that.

                --- In thenewcovenoflouise
                <mailto:thenewcovenoflouisebrooks%40yahoogroups.com> brooks@yahoogroups.com,
                olive_e_thomas
                <no_reply@...> wrote:
                >
                > The way I look at it she was more concerned about the loss of personal
                control. Like if Oprah had tried to put her book in her book club Louise
                would likely refuse on the grounds any success would "belong" to Oprah and
                not to her...
                >

                Perri Lee Leuthard

                ---------------------------------
                Don't pick lemons.
                See all the new 2007 cars at Yahoo! Autos.

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Chuck Golden
                Perri Lee, She said several times that one of the reasons she wouldn t publish her biography was that to do it properly would mean spilling all the sexual
                Message 7 of 29 , May 7, 2007
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                  Perri Lee,

                  She said several times that one of the reasons she wouldn't publish
                  her biography was that to do it properly would mean spilling all the
                  sexual beans and that she had concerns about what this could
                  potentially do to influence young girls. She admitted to her priest
                  in the mid-50s that when she read about drinking she wanted a drink
                  and when she read about sex she got excited. So she opted not to
                  publish her memoirs out of concern for impressionable young women.
                  On the one hand, she wouldn't renounce her lifestyle (standing toe-to-
                  toe with her priest), on the other hand she was concerned about
                  having young girls see her habits and lifestyle as desirable and
                  exciting. Therein lies one of the many apparant contradictions of
                  Louise Brooks. In fact, it's not so much a contradiction as a proof
                  of her brutal, flint-like honesty. I am what I am, I don't plan on
                  being anything but what I am, and you don't want to be what I am.

                  I'm not sure what you mean about the "twisted religions beliefs of
                  her region and her day". The only periods in her life where religion
                  was mentioned was a very short period in her mid-teens when she
                  attended a Protestant church (in Wichita and staying just long enough
                  to evidently have a fling with an older man in the church before
                  moving to Manhatten), and for ten years as a Catholic between 1954
                  and 1964 in New York. I certainly don't see either of them as being
                  twisted in either location. Except for the Catholic period, I think
                  Louise's attitude towards religion was ambivalence rather than
                  antagonism. Interestingly, despite her declaring that she left the
                  Church in 1964, when she died one of the few things of note in her
                  little apartment was a crucifix at the end of her bed. I think she
                  had a statue of the Virgin on her dresser as well. If she saw the
                  religious beliefs of her day as twisted she never hinted at that
                  opinion.

                  Cheers!


                  --- In thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com, Perri Lee
                  <cheaptrickaz@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I have to add one more thing to all of this. I think she did not
                  want to publish her own bio or let anyone else do it because of all
                  the escapades she was involved in aka party girl. I think this was
                  also mixed with the twisted religious beliefs of her region and her
                  day. Perri Lee
                  >
                  > Chuck Golden <bagnoli2@...> wrote: I think you've hit on
                  one of THE major aspects of her personality. All
                  > through the Paris bio, especially towards the end, it's evident
                  that
                  > she had to be in control - not so much in control of the people but
                  in
                  > control of the situation. Ken Tynan wrote the blockbuster
                  piece "The
                  > Girl in the Black Helmet" for the New Yorker which shot her back to
                  the
                  > top of the public consciousness. Not long afterwards, she got word
                  > from him that he'd been out on the West Coast discussing (without
                  her
                  > knowing it) a bio-pic with a major Hollywood director. She went
                  > ballistic, refused any thought of letting the film be done (despite
                  the
                  > increased fame and money), and cut Ken Tynan off forever. She
                  > excoriated him for having the temerity of discussing a project that
                  > involved her behind her back. The evident botton line is that she
                  > wouldn't agree to putting herself and her story in a situation
                  where
                  > she couldn't be 100% in control of it.
                  >
                  > Now, as to why she was so much that way... any psycologists out
                  there?
                  > Certainly, she was her mother's daughter and the apple seldom falls
                  far
                  > from the tree. But she was far too complex for it to be something
                  as
                  > simple as that.
                  >
                  > --- In thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com, olive_e_thomas
                  > <no_reply@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > The way I look at it she was more concerned about the loss of
                  > > personal control. Like if Oprah had tried to put her book in her
                  > > book club Louise would likely refuse on the grounds any
                  > > success would "belong" to Oprah and not to her...
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Perri Lee Leuthard
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ---------------------------------
                  > Don't pick lemons.
                  > See all the new 2007 cars at Yahoo! Autos.
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                • Perri Lee
                  I still beleive that the reason she did not publish was some how tied to the twisted religious moral thing. It is why I feel she did not write and it still is
                  Message 8 of 29 , May 7, 2007
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                    I still beleive that the reason she did not publish was some how tied to the twisted religious moral thing. It is why I feel she did not write and it still is the same thing and reason why people and persons hold themselves back today. But of course this is getting to be too large of a subject for this group. thanks

                    Chuck Golden <bagnoli2@...> wrote: Perri Lee,

                    She said several times that one of the reasons she wouldn't publish
                    her biography was that to do it properly would mean spilling all the
                    sexual beans and that she had concerns about what this could
                    potentially do to influence young girls. She admitted to her priest
                    in the mid-50s that when she read about drinking she wanted a drink
                    and when she read about sex she got excited. So she opted not to
                    publish her memoirs out of concern for impressionable young women.
                    On the one hand, she wouldn't renounce her lifestyle (standing toe-to-
                    toe with her priest), on the other hand she was concerned about
                    having young girls see her habits and lifestyle as desirable and
                    exciting. Therein lies one of the many apparant contradictions of
                    Louise Brooks. In fact, it's not so much a contradiction as a proof
                    of her brutal, flint-like honesty. I am what I am, I don't plan on
                    being anything but what I am, and you don't want to be what I am.

                    I'm not sure what you mean about the "twisted religions beliefs of
                    her region and her day". The only periods in her life where religion
                    was mentioned was a very short period in her mid-teens when she
                    attended a Protestant church (in Wichita and staying just long enough
                    to evidently have a fling with an older man in the church before
                    moving to Manhatten), and for ten years as a Catholic between 1954
                    and 1964 in New York. I certainly don't see either of them as being
                    twisted in either location. Except for the Catholic period, I think
                    Louise's attitude towards religion was ambivalence rather than
                    antagonism. Interestingly, despite her declaring that she left the
                    Church in 1964, when she died one of the few things of note in her
                    little apartment was a crucifix at the end of her bed. I think she
                    had a statue of the Virgin on her dresser as well. If she saw the
                    religious beliefs of her day as twisted she never hinted at that
                    opinion.

                    Cheers!

                    --- In thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com, Perri Lee
                    <cheaptrickaz@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I have to add one more thing to all of this. I think she did not
                    want to publish her own bio or let anyone else do it because of all
                    the escapades she was involved in aka party girl. I think this was
                    also mixed with the twisted religious beliefs of her region and her
                    day. Perri Lee
                    >
                    > Chuck Golden <bagnoli2@...> wrote: I think you've hit on
                    one of THE major aspects of her personality. All
                    > through the Paris bio, especially towards the end, it's evident
                    that
                    > she had to be in control - not so much in control of the people but
                    in
                    > control of the situation. Ken Tynan wrote the blockbuster
                    piece "The
                    > Girl in the Black Helmet" for the New Yorker which shot her back to
                    the
                    > top of the public consciousness. Not long afterwards, she got word
                    > from him that he'd been out on the West Coast discussing (without
                    her
                    > knowing it) a bio-pic with a major Hollywood director. She went
                    > ballistic, refused any thought of letting the film be done (despite
                    the
                    > increased fame and money), and cut Ken Tynan off forever. She
                    > excoriated him for having the temerity of discussing a project that
                    > involved her behind her back. The evident botton line is that she
                    > wouldn't agree to putting herself and her story in a situation
                    where
                    > she couldn't be 100% in control of it.
                    >
                    > Now, as to why she was so much that way... any psycologists out
                    there?
                    > Certainly, she was her mother's daughter and the apple seldom falls
                    far
                    > from the tree. But she was far too complex for it to be something
                    as
                    > simple as that.
                    >
                    > --- In thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com, olive_e_thomas
                    > <no_reply@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > The way I look at it she was more concerned about the loss of
                    > > personal control. Like if Oprah had tried to put her book in her
                    > > book club Louise would likely refuse on the grounds any
                    > > success would "belong" to Oprah and not to her...
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Perri Lee Leuthard
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ---------------------------------
                    > Don't pick lemons.
                    > See all the new 2007 cars at Yahoo! Autos.
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >






                    Perri Lee Leuthard



                    ---------------------------------
                    Ahhh...imagining that irresistible "new car" smell?
                    Check outnew cars at Yahoo! Autos.

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Anita M
                    IMO she was being socially responsible; particularly in respect to underage girls, who (judging from my own experience) are impressionable and most likely to
                    Message 9 of 29 , May 7, 2007
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                      IMO she was being socially responsible; particularly in respect to underage
                      girls, who (judging from my own experience) are impressionable and most
                      likely to seek out those kinds of stories. At that point in my life, illegal
                      drug use and being an underachiever was glorified. I knew people who bought
                      into that and regretted it later. Instead of writing about her adventures
                      and saying at the end “don’t do what I did,” (which seldom carries any
                      weight if ever) she chose not to tell at all.



                      Whether it mattered to her or not Brooksie knew that in her day “spilling
                      the sexual beans” could ruin a career; today it enhances it. (If you ever
                      have to stand in line in a grocery store, you know which celebrities are
                      doing what because the tabloids are in plain sight whether you want to see
                      them or not.)



                      Anita M.



                      _____

                      From: thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com
                      [mailto:thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Chuck Golden
                      Sent: Monday, May 07, 2007 8:06 AM
                      To: thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [The New Coven of Louise Brooks] Psychological Profile?



                      Perri Lee,

                      She said several times that one of the reasons she wouldn't publish her
                      biography was that to do it properly would mean spilling all the sexual
                      beans and that she had concerns about what this could potentially do to
                      influence young girls. She admitted to her priest in the mid-50s that when
                      she read about drinking she wanted a drink and when she read about sex she
                      got excited. So she opted not to publish her memoirs out of concern for
                      impressionable young women. On the one hand, she wouldn't renounce her
                      lifestyle (standing toe-to-toe with her priest), on the other hand she was
                      concerned about having young girls see her habits and lifestyle as desirable
                      and exciting. Therein lies one of the many apparant contradictions of
                      Louise Brooks. In fact, it's not so much a contradiction as a proof of her
                      brutal, flint-like honesty. I am what I am, I don't plan on being anything
                      but what I am, and you don't want to be what I am.

                      I'm not sure what you mean about the "twisted religions beliefs of her
                      region and her day". The only periods in her life where religion was
                      mentioned was a very short period in her mid-teens when she attended a
                      Protestant church (in Wichita and staying just long enough to evidently have
                      a fling with an older man in the church before moving to Manhatten), and for
                      ten years as a Catholic between 1954 and 1964 in New York. I certainly don't
                      see either of them as being twisted in either location. Except for the
                      Catholic period, I think Louise's attitude towards religion was ambivalence
                      rather than antagonism. Interestingly, despite her declaring that she left
                      the Church in 1964, when she died one of the few things of note in her
                      little apartment was a crucifix at the end of her bed. I think she had a
                      statue of the Virgin on her dresser as well. If she saw the religious
                      beliefs of her day as twisted she never hinted at that opinion.

                      Cheers!

                      >
                      > I have to add one more thing to all of this. I think she did not want to
                      publish her own bio or let anyone else do it because of all the escapades
                      she was involved in aka party girl. I think this was also mixed with the
                      twisted religious beliefs of her region and her day. Perri Lee





                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • nutsaboutclara
                      That s quite true, Olive. Brooksie always wanted to control the situation, so that she could be the center of attention. It was that way at home, when she
                      Message 10 of 29 , May 7, 2007
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                        That's quite true, Olive. Brooksie always wanted to control the
                        situation, so that she could be the center of attention. It was that
                        way at home, when she and her mother bickered, and it continued well
                        into adulthood. She was her own marching band, which turned a lot of
                        people off, that's for sure.

                        -Dario.


                        --- In thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com, olive_e_thomas
                        <no_reply@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > The way I look at it she was more concerned about the loss of
                        > personal control. Like if Oprah had tried to put her book in her
                        > book club Louise would likely refuse on the grounds any
                        > success would "belong" to Oprah and not to her...
                        >
                      • nutsaboutclara
                        She was a very willful person, Chuck; it was her way and nothing else. Clara Bow was like that to an extent, but she was outgoing and cheerful towards all
                        Message 11 of 29 , May 7, 2007
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                          She was a very willful person, Chuck; it was her way and nothing
                          else. Clara Bow was like that to an extent, but she was outgoing and
                          cheerful towards all that met Clara. But Brooksie was moody,
                          taciturn at times, and an intelectual snob, who thought that she was
                          above everyone when it came film(film history, film making, actors &
                          actresses, etc.), literature, politics, sex, male/female
                          relationships, etc. And, very opinionated. But, I love her for it,
                          because she would be who she was if she wasn't that in the first
                          place. I marvel at her strong sense of independence. That made her
                          stand out more than her contemporaries.

                          -Dario.



                          --- In thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com, "Chuck Golden"
                          <bagnoli2@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > I think you've hit on one of THE major aspects of her personality.
                          All
                          > through the Paris bio, especially towards the end, it's evident
                          that
                          > she had to be in control - not so much in control of the people but
                          in
                          > control of the situation. Ken Tynan wrote the blockbuster
                          piece "The
                          > Girl in the Black Helmet" for the New Yorker which shot her back to
                          the
                          > top of the public consciousness. Not long afterwards, she got word
                          > from him that he'd been out on the West Coast discussing (without
                          her
                          > knowing it) a bio-pic with a major Hollywood director. She went
                          > ballistic, refused any thought of letting the film be done (despite
                          the
                          > increased fame and money), and cut Ken Tynan off forever. She
                          > excoriated him for having the temerity of discussing a project that
                          > involved her behind her back. The evident botton line is that she
                          > wouldn't agree to putting herself and her story in a situation
                          where
                          > she couldn't be 100% in control of it.
                          >
                          > Now, as to why she was so much that way... any psycologists out
                          there?
                          > Certainly, she was her mother's daughter and the apple seldom falls
                          far
                          > from the tree. But she was far too complex for it to be something
                          as
                          > simple as that.
                          >
                          >
                          > --- In thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com, olive_e_thomas
                          > <no_reply@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > The way I look at it she was more concerned about the loss of
                          > > personal control. Like if Oprah had tried to put her book in her
                          > > book club Louise would likely refuse on the grounds any
                          > > success would "belong" to Oprah and not to her...
                          > >
                          >
                        • olive_e_thomas
                          I doubt that Louise had much concern for ruining the morals of children (she seemed more from the WC Fields school of child-care in that respect). My guess is
                          Message 12 of 29 , May 7, 2007
                          • 0 Attachment
                            I doubt that Louise had much concern for ruining the morals of
                            children (she seemed more from the WC Fields school of
                            child-care in that respect). My guess is - assuming she really
                            ever wrote a full memoir - she just didn't like the snot-nosed little
                            brat she came off sounding like in print and opted for a more
                            selective approach. Or the final result just looks like crap and it
                            was easier to torch than try and rewrite...

                            It could also be that she opted for little set pieces instead of one
                            whole go so that she could improve her writing skills as she
                            went.

                            But "social responsibilty" and "Louise Brooks" are two sets of
                            words that just don't seem to go together...

                            --- In thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com, "Anita M"
                            <Woodsy@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > IMO she was being socially responsible; particularly in respect
                            to underage
                            > girls, who (judging from my own experience) are
                            impressionable and most
                            > likely to seek out those kinds of stories. At that point in my life,
                            illegal
                            > drug use and being an underachiever was glorified. I knew
                            people who bought
                            > into that and regretted it later. Instead of writing about her
                            adventures
                            > and saying at the end "don't do what I did," (which seldom
                            carries any
                            > weight if ever) she chose not to tell at all.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Whether it mattered to her or not Brooksie knew that in her day
                            "spilling
                            > the sexual beans" could ruin a career; today it enhances it. (If
                            you ever
                            > have to stand in line in a grocery store, you know which
                            celebrities are
                            > doing what because the tabloids are in plain sight whether you
                            want to see
                            > them or not.)
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Anita M.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > _____
                            >
                            > From: thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com
                            > [mailto:thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com] On
                            Behalf Of Chuck Golden
                            > Sent: Monday, May 07, 2007 8:06 AM
                            > To: thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com
                            > Subject: Re: [The New Coven of Louise Brooks] Psychological
                            Profile?
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Perri Lee,
                            >
                            > She said several times that one of the reasons she wouldn't
                            publish her
                            > biography was that to do it properly would mean spilling all the
                            sexual
                            > beans and that she had concerns about what this could
                            potentially do to
                            > influence young girls. She admitted to her priest in the mid-50s
                            that when
                            > she read about drinking she wanted a drink and when she
                            read about sex she
                            > got excited. So she opted not to publish her memoirs out of
                            concern for
                            > impressionable young women. On the one hand, she wouldn't
                            renounce her
                            > lifestyle (standing toe-to-toe with her priest), on the other hand
                            she was
                            > concerned about having young girls see her habits and
                            lifestyle as desirable
                            > and exciting. Therein lies one of the many apparant
                            contradictions of
                            > Louise Brooks. In fact, it's not so much a contradiction as a
                            proof of her
                            > brutal, flint-like honesty. I am what I am, I don't plan on being
                            anything
                            > but what I am, and you don't want to be what I am.
                            >
                            > I'm not sure what you mean about the "twisted religions beliefs
                            of her
                            > region and her day". The only periods in her life where religion
                            was
                            > mentioned was a very short period in her mid-teens when she
                            attended a
                            > Protestant church (in Wichita and staying just long enough to
                            evidently have
                            > a fling with an older man in the church before moving to
                            Manhatten), and for
                            > ten years as a Catholic between 1954 and 1964 in New York. I
                            certainly don't
                            > see either of them as being twisted in either location. Except
                            for the
                            > Catholic period, I think Louise's attitude towards religion was
                            ambivalence
                            > rather than antagonism. Interestingly, despite her declaring
                            that she left
                            > the Church in 1964, when she died one of the few things of
                            note in her
                            > little apartment was a crucifix at the end of her bed. I think she
                            had a
                            > statue of the Virgin on her dresser as well. If she saw the
                            religious
                            > beliefs of her day as twisted she never hinted at that opinion.
                            >
                            > Cheers!
                            >
                            > >
                            > > I have to add one more thing to all of this. I think she did not
                            want to
                            > publish her own bio or let anyone else do it because of all the
                            escapades
                            > she was involved in aka party girl. I think this was also mixed
                            with the
                            > twisted religious beliefs of her region and her day. Perri Lee
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                          • nutsaboutclara
                            HEAR, HEAR!!! Discriminatory would probably be a better word for what Brooksie was all about, in respect to people, art, literature, etc. You hit the nail on
                            Message 13 of 29 , May 9, 2007
                            • 0 Attachment
                              HEAR, HEAR!!! Discriminatory would probably be a better word for
                              what Brooksie was all about, in respect to people, art, literature,
                              etc. You hit the nail on the head perfectly, Olive. Kudos!

                              -Dario.


                              --- In thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com, olive_e_thomas
                              <no_reply@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > I doubt that Louise had much concern for ruining the morals of
                              > children (she seemed more from the WC Fields school of
                              > child-care in that respect). My guess is - assuming she really
                              > ever wrote a full memoir - she just didn't like the snot-nosed
                              little
                              > brat she came off sounding like in print and opted for a more
                              > selective approach. Or the final result just looks like crap and
                              it
                              > was easier to torch than try and rewrite...
                              >
                              > It could also be that she opted for little set pieces instead of
                              one
                              > whole go so that she could improve her writing skills as she
                              > went.
                              >
                              > But "social responsibilty" and "Louise Brooks" are two sets of
                              > words that just don't seem to go together...
                              >
                              > --- In thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com, "Anita M"
                              > <Woodsy@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > IMO she was being socially responsible; particularly in respect
                              > to underage
                              > > girls, who (judging from my own experience) are
                              > impressionable and most
                              > > likely to seek out those kinds of stories. At that point in my
                              life,
                              > illegal
                              > > drug use and being an underachiever was glorified. I knew
                              > people who bought
                              > > into that and regretted it later. Instead of writing about her
                              > adventures
                              > > and saying at the end "don't do what I did," (which seldom
                              > carries any
                              > > weight if ever) she chose not to tell at all.
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > Whether it mattered to her or not Brooksie knew that in her day
                              > "spilling
                              > > the sexual beans" could ruin a career; today it enhances it. (If
                              > you ever
                              > > have to stand in line in a grocery store, you know which
                              > celebrities are
                              > > doing what because the tabloids are in plain sight whether you
                              > want to see
                              > > them or not.)
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > Anita M.
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > _____
                              > >
                              > > From: thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com
                              > > [mailto:thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com] On
                              > Behalf Of Chuck Golden
                              > > Sent: Monday, May 07, 2007 8:06 AM
                              > > To: thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com
                              > > Subject: Re: [The New Coven of Louise Brooks] Psychological
                              > Profile?
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > Perri Lee,
                              > >
                              > > She said several times that one of the reasons she wouldn't
                              > publish her
                              > > biography was that to do it properly would mean spilling all the
                              > sexual
                              > > beans and that she had concerns about what this could
                              > potentially do to
                              > > influence young girls. She admitted to her priest in the mid-50s
                              > that when
                              > > she read about drinking she wanted a drink and when she
                              > read about sex she
                              > > got excited. So she opted not to publish her memoirs out of
                              > concern for
                              > > impressionable young women. On the one hand, she wouldn't
                              > renounce her
                              > > lifestyle (standing toe-to-toe with her priest), on the other
                              hand
                              > she was
                              > > concerned about having young girls see her habits and
                              > lifestyle as desirable
                              > > and exciting. Therein lies one of the many apparant
                              > contradictions of
                              > > Louise Brooks. In fact, it's not so much a contradiction as a
                              > proof of her
                              > > brutal, flint-like honesty. I am what I am, I don't plan on
                              being
                              > anything
                              > > but what I am, and you don't want to be what I am.
                              > >
                              > > I'm not sure what you mean about the "twisted religions beliefs
                              > of her
                              > > region and her day". The only periods in her life where religion
                              > was
                              > > mentioned was a very short period in her mid-teens when she
                              > attended a
                              > > Protestant church (in Wichita and staying just long enough to
                              > evidently have
                              > > a fling with an older man in the church before moving to
                              > Manhatten), and for
                              > > ten years as a Catholic between 1954 and 1964 in New York. I
                              > certainly don't
                              > > see either of them as being twisted in either location. Except
                              > for the
                              > > Catholic period, I think Louise's attitude towards religion was
                              > ambivalence
                              > > rather than antagonism. Interestingly, despite her declaring
                              > that she left
                              > > the Church in 1964, when she died one of the few things of
                              > note in her
                              > > little apartment was a crucifix at the end of her bed. I think
                              she
                              > had a
                              > > statue of the Virgin on her dresser as well. If she saw the
                              > religious
                              > > beliefs of her day as twisted she never hinted at that opinion.
                              > >
                              > > Cheers!
                              > >
                              > > >
                              > > > I have to add one more thing to all of this. I think she did
                              not
                              > want to
                              > > publish her own bio or let anyone else do it because of all the
                              > escapades
                              > > she was involved in aka party girl. I think this was also mixed
                              > with the
                              > > twisted religious beliefs of her region and her day. Perri Lee
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              > >
                              >
                            • Anita M.
                              Now I m confused. Chuck said She said several times that one of the reasons she wouldn t publish her biography was that to do it properly would mean spilling
                              Message 14 of 29 , May 9, 2007
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Now I'm confused.

                                Chuck said "She said several times that one of the reasons she
                                wouldn't publish her biography was that to do it properly would mean
                                spilling all the sexual beans and that she had concerns about what
                                this could potentially do to influence young girls. She admitted to
                                her priest in the mid-50s that when she read about drinking she
                                wanted a drink and when she read about sex she got excited. So she
                                opted not to publish her memoirs out of concern for impressionable
                                young women."

                                But then, some people say one thing one day and the opposite another
                                day - maybe a way to hold onto a little privacy.

                                Anita M.


                                --- In thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com, olive_e_thomas
                                <no_reply@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > I doubt that Louise had much concern for ruining the morals of
                                > children (she seemed more from the WC Fields school of
                                > child-care in that respect). My guess is - assuming she really
                                > ever wrote a full memoir - she just didn't like the snot-nosed
                                little
                                > brat she came off sounding like in print and opted for a more
                                > selective approach. Or the final result just looks like crap and it
                                > was easier to torch than try and rewrite...
                                >
                                > It could also be that she opted for little set pieces instead of
                                one
                                > whole go so that she could improve her writing skills as she
                                > went.
                                >
                                > But "social responsibilty" and "Louise Brooks" are two sets of
                                > words that just don't seem to go together...
                                >
                                > --- In thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com, "Anita M"
                                > <Woodsy@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > IMO she was being socially responsible; particularly in respect
                                > to underage
                                > > girls, who (judging from my own experience) are
                                > impressionable and most
                                > > likely to seek out those kinds of stories. At that point in my
                                life,
                                > illegal
                                > > drug use and being an underachiever was glorified. I knew
                                > people who bought
                                > > into that and regretted it later. Instead of writing about her
                                > adventures
                                > > and saying at the end "don't do what I did," (which seldom
                                > carries any
                                > > weight if ever) she chose not to tell at all.
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > Whether it mattered to her or not Brooksie knew that in her day
                                > "spilling
                                > > the sexual beans" could ruin a career; today it enhances it. (If
                                > you ever
                                > > have to stand in line in a grocery store, you know which
                                > celebrities are
                                > > doing what because the tabloids are in plain sight whether you
                                > want to see
                                > > them or not.)
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > Anita M.
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > _____
                                > >
                                > > From: thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com
                                > > [mailto:thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com] On
                                > Behalf Of Chuck Golden
                                > > Sent: Monday, May 07, 2007 8:06 AM
                                > > To: thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com
                                > > Subject: Re: [The New Coven of Louise Brooks] Psychological
                                > Profile?
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > Perri Lee,
                                > >
                                > > She said several times that one of the reasons she wouldn't
                                > publish her
                                > > biography was that to do it properly would mean spilling all the
                                > sexual
                                > > beans and that she had concerns about what this could
                                > potentially do to
                                > > influence young girls. She admitted to her priest in the mid-50s
                                > that when
                                > > she read about drinking she wanted a drink and when she
                                > read about sex she
                                > > got excited. So she opted not to publish her memoirs out of
                                > concern for
                                > > impressionable young women. On the one hand, she wouldn't
                                > renounce her
                                > > lifestyle (standing toe-to-toe with her priest), on the other
                                hand
                                > she was
                                > > concerned about having young girls see her habits and
                                > lifestyle as desirable
                                > > and exciting. Therein lies one of the many apparant
                                > contradictions of
                                > > Louise Brooks. In fact, it's not so much a contradiction as a
                                > proof of her
                                > > brutal, flint-like honesty. I am what I am, I don't plan on being
                                > anything
                                > > but what I am, and you don't want to be what I am.
                                > >
                                > > I'm not sure what you mean about the "twisted religions beliefs
                                > of her
                                > > region and her day". The only periods in her life where religion
                                > was
                                > > mentioned was a very short period in her mid-teens when she
                                > attended a
                                > > Protestant church (in Wichita and staying just long enough to
                                > evidently have
                                > > a fling with an older man in the church before moving to
                                > Manhatten), and for
                                > > ten years as a Catholic between 1954 and 1964 in New York. I
                                > certainly don't
                                > > see either of them as being twisted in either location. Except
                                > for the
                                > > Catholic period, I think Louise's attitude towards religion was
                                > ambivalence
                                > > rather than antagonism. Interestingly, despite her declaring
                                > that she left
                                > > the Church in 1964, when she died one of the few things of
                                > note in her
                                > > little apartment was a crucifix at the end of her bed. I think
                                she
                                > had a
                                > > statue of the Virgin on her dresser as well. If she saw the
                                > religious
                                > > beliefs of her day as twisted she never hinted at that opinion.
                                > >
                                > > Cheers!
                                > >
                                > > >
                                > > > I have to add one more thing to all of this. I think she did
                                not
                                > want to
                                > > publish her own bio or let anyone else do it because of all the
                                > escapades
                                > > she was involved in aka party girl. I think this was also mixed
                                > with the
                                > > twisted religious beliefs of her region and her day. Perri Lee
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                > >
                                >
                              • olive_e_thomas
                                Some clue as to her reasoning might be found in her comments after turning down Playboy magazine for a writing job all they want is (an article about) tits
                                Message 15 of 29 , May 9, 2007
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Some clue as to her reasoning might be found in her comments
                                  after turning down Playboy magazine for a writing job "all they
                                  want is (an article about) tits and free-fucking for men."

                                  --- In thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com, "Anita M."
                                  <Woodsy@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Now I'm confused.
                                  >
                                  > Chuck said "She said several times that one of the reasons
                                  she
                                  > wouldn't publish her biography was that to do it properly would
                                  mean
                                  > spilling all the sexual beans and that she had concerns about
                                  what
                                  > this could potentially do to influence young girls. She admitted
                                  to
                                  > her priest in the mid-50s that when she read about drinking
                                  she
                                  > wanted a drink and when she read about sex she got excited.
                                  So she
                                  > opted not to publish her memoirs out of concern for
                                  impressionable
                                  > young women."
                                  >
                                  > But then, some people say one thing one day and the opposite
                                  another
                                  > day - maybe a way to hold onto a little privacy.
                                  >
                                  > Anita M.
                                  >
                                  >
                                • nutsaboutclara
                                  Brooksie was trying to protect herself from what others said about her. She never did trust people whom she met and later talked trash about her. Brooksie
                                  Message 16 of 29 , May 12, 2007
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Brooksie was trying to protect herself from what others said about
                                    her. She never did trust people whom she met and later talked trash
                                    about her. Brooksie was one tough egg to crack, that's for sure.

                                    -Dario.


                                    --- In thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com, "Anita M."
                                    <Woodsy@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Now I'm confused.
                                    >
                                    > Chuck said "She said several times that one of the reasons she
                                    > wouldn't publish her biography was that to do it properly would
                                    mean
                                    > spilling all the sexual beans and that she had concerns about what
                                    > this could potentially do to influence young girls. She admitted
                                    to
                                    > her priest in the mid-50s that when she read about drinking she
                                    > wanted a drink and when she read about sex she got excited. So she
                                    > opted not to publish her memoirs out of concern for impressionable
                                    > young women."
                                    >
                                    > But then, some people say one thing one day and the opposite
                                    another
                                    > day - maybe a way to hold onto a little privacy.
                                    >
                                    > Anita M.
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > --- In thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com, olive_e_thomas
                                    > <no_reply@> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > I doubt that Louise had much concern for ruining the morals of
                                    > > children (she seemed more from the WC Fields school of
                                    > > child-care in that respect). My guess is - assuming she really
                                    > > ever wrote a full memoir - she just didn't like the snot-nosed
                                    > little
                                    > > brat she came off sounding like in print and opted for a more
                                    > > selective approach. Or the final result just looks like crap and
                                    it
                                    > > was easier to torch than try and rewrite...
                                    > >
                                    > > It could also be that she opted for little set pieces instead of
                                    > one
                                    > > whole go so that she could improve her writing skills as she
                                    > > went.
                                    > >
                                    > > But "social responsibilty" and "Louise Brooks" are two sets of
                                    > > words that just don't seem to go together...
                                    > >
                                    > > --- In thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com, "Anita M"
                                    > > <Woodsy@> wrote:
                                    > > >
                                    > > > IMO she was being socially responsible; particularly in
                                    respect
                                    > > to underage
                                    > > > girls, who (judging from my own experience) are
                                    > > impressionable and most
                                    > > > likely to seek out those kinds of stories. At that point in my
                                    > life,
                                    > > illegal
                                    > > > drug use and being an underachiever was glorified. I knew
                                    > > people who bought
                                    > > > into that and regretted it later. Instead of writing about her
                                    > > adventures
                                    > > > and saying at the end "don't do what I did," (which seldom
                                    > > carries any
                                    > > > weight if ever) she chose not to tell at all.
                                    > > >
                                    > > >
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Whether it mattered to her or not Brooksie knew that in her
                                    day
                                    > > "spilling
                                    > > > the sexual beans" could ruin a career; today it enhances it.
                                    (If
                                    > > you ever
                                    > > > have to stand in line in a grocery store, you know which
                                    > > celebrities are
                                    > > > doing what because the tabloids are in plain sight whether you
                                    > > want to see
                                    > > > them or not.)
                                    > > >
                                    > > >
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Anita M.
                                    > > >
                                    > > >
                                    > > >
                                    > > > _____
                                    > > >
                                    > > > From: thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com
                                    > > > [mailto:thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com] On
                                    > > Behalf Of Chuck Golden
                                    > > > Sent: Monday, May 07, 2007 8:06 AM
                                    > > > To: thenewcovenoflouisebrooks@yahoogroups.com
                                    > > > Subject: Re: [The New Coven of Louise Brooks] Psychological
                                    > > Profile?
                                    > > >
                                    > > >
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Perri Lee,
                                    > > >
                                    > > > She said several times that one of the reasons she wouldn't
                                    > > publish her
                                    > > > biography was that to do it properly would mean spilling all
                                    the
                                    > > sexual
                                    > > > beans and that she had concerns about what this could
                                    > > potentially do to
                                    > > > influence young girls. She admitted to her priest in the mid-
                                    50s
                                    > > that when
                                    > > > she read about drinking she wanted a drink and when she
                                    > > read about sex she
                                    > > > got excited. So she opted not to publish her memoirs out of
                                    > > concern for
                                    > > > impressionable young women. On the one hand, she wouldn't
                                    > > renounce her
                                    > > > lifestyle (standing toe-to-toe with her priest), on the other
                                    > hand
                                    > > she was
                                    > > > concerned about having young girls see her habits and
                                    > > lifestyle as desirable
                                    > > > and exciting. Therein lies one of the many apparant
                                    > > contradictions of
                                    > > > Louise Brooks. In fact, it's not so much a contradiction as a
                                    > > proof of her
                                    > > > brutal, flint-like honesty. I am what I am, I don't plan on
                                    being
                                    > > anything
                                    > > > but what I am, and you don't want to be what I am.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > I'm not sure what you mean about the "twisted religions
                                    beliefs
                                    > > of her
                                    > > > region and her day". The only periods in her life where
                                    religion
                                    > > was
                                    > > > mentioned was a very short period in her mid-teens when she
                                    > > attended a
                                    > > > Protestant church (in Wichita and staying just long enough to
                                    > > evidently have
                                    > > > a fling with an older man in the church before moving to
                                    > > Manhatten), and for
                                    > > > ten years as a Catholic between 1954 and 1964 in New York. I
                                    > > certainly don't
                                    > > > see either of them as being twisted in either location. Except
                                    > > for the
                                    > > > Catholic period, I think Louise's attitude towards religion
                                    was
                                    > > ambivalence
                                    > > > rather than antagonism. Interestingly, despite her declaring
                                    > > that she left
                                    > > > the Church in 1964, when she died one of the few things of
                                    > > note in her
                                    > > > little apartment was a crucifix at the end of her bed. I think
                                    > she
                                    > > had a
                                    > > > statue of the Virgin on her dresser as well. If she saw the
                                    > > religious
                                    > > > beliefs of her day as twisted she never hinted at that opinion.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Cheers!
                                    > > >
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > > I have to add one more thing to all of this. I think she did
                                    > not
                                    > > want to
                                    > > > publish her own bio or let anyone else do it because of all
                                    the
                                    > > escapades
                                    > > > she was involved in aka party girl. I think this was also
                                    mixed
                                    > > with the
                                    > > > twisted religious beliefs of her region and her day. Perri Lee
                                    > > >
                                    > > >
                                    > > >
                                    > > >
                                    > > >
                                    > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    > > >
                                    > >
                                    >
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