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Re: [t93] A few questions

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  • Odysseus
    ... Alternatively one can give just the sign of the Sun and Moon without specifying their longitudes to the degree, which narrows the time down to a period of
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 23, 2003
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      --- In thelema93-l@yahoogroups.com, "antaios" <antaios@h...> wrote:
      > For the year, first subtract 1904 from the secular year, and divide by
      > 22. (If it's after the secular New Year, but before the Spring Equinox, use
      > the previous secular year. So for February, 2003, you would still divide 2002
      > by 22). The integer portion of the result is the 1st tier of the date, in
      > this case, expressed in Roman numerals, IV. The second tier is the remainder,
      > in this case 11, or xi. So the year is An. IVxi, or Anno IVxi. The next part
      > of the date is to give the degree of the sun and moon, which pins down a
      > particular day and time to within a few hours. For this you would have to
      > consult an ephemeris or use an astrology computer program. There are several
      > free programs on the net that either calculate sun and moon positions or the
      > entire thelemic date. Often the common or secular date is included with the
      > thelemic date to eliminate any ambiguity, but this is not necessary.
      >
      Alternatively one can give just the sign of the Sun and Moon without
      specifying their longitudes to the degree, which narrows the time down
      to a period of two or three days, then the planetary ruler of the
      weekday (e.g. Tuesday is _die Martis_) is sufficient to identify the
      date.

      --
      Odysseus
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