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Word roots and the Divine Cow - (from the A-T list)

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  • eyeofhoor
    ... The association of the semitic glottal stop with the Egyptian vulture/eagle is a dated conception, and obviously incorrect due to certain Egyptian words
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 7, 2003
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      Hal VonHofe wrote:

      > The phoenician, hebrew and greek alphabets descended from the 24
      > egyptian hieorglyphic letters. The greek revealed the vowels by
      > letter them in addition.

      > 'Aleph', 'alpha', and 'a' all purloinments of the egyptian glottal
      > stop vulture...

      The association of the semitic glottal stop with the Egyptian
      vulture/eagle is a dated conception, and obviously incorrect due to
      certain Egyptian words being unpronouncable when the glottal stop is
      used. I picked this up on the AEL list, where the members are engaged
      in cutting-edge studies of the Egyptian language. I think the correct
      phonetic value for the eagle-vulture is /L/.

      As a matter of convenience, the eagle sign is written in manuel de
      codage as 'A'. If I'm correct, then the Egyptian word 'dA.t' can be
      spelled phonetically as DLT; the word means 'portal', and is probably
      the source of the Hebrew tri-consonantal root DLT, from which the
      association Daleth/door is derived. There are other connections that
      can be made between Egyptian words and the Hebrew letters names, such
      as MW (Mem), which means water, and several words that are similar to
      Teth which mean serpent. I have also theorized that the original name
      of the letter symbolized by the head of the cow/bull (aleph) is Ah.t
      (LHT), which means 'divine cow', based on the possibility the
      Egyptians converted their alphabet acrophonically into more
      universal symbols. The association may explain why Aiwass called the
      Book of the Law 'L', due to the literary form of the book being
      remarkably similar the ancient versions of 'The Book of the Divine
      Cow'.

      Prophet of L
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