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JSA abroad?

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  • earth1redbee
    Last week I finished a memoir by an author named Carlos Eire about growing up in Cuba in the late 1950s. He mentioned the periodic thrill of receiving a
    Message 1 of 12 , Aug 6, 2010
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      Last week I finished a memoir by an author named Carlos Eire about growing up in Cuba in the late 1950s. He mentioned the periodic thrill of receiving a Superman or especially a Batman comic from an aunt. I didn't get the impression that these were comics printed in English, and I've certainly seen Spanish-language DC comics from time to time over the years.

      That made me wonder, do any of you know if All-Star Comics (not All-Star Western) was ever published outside of the U.S. and Canada, or were any JSA stories published abroad through the mid-1950s under another title? If not, what about solo stories of JSA members? I'm particularly wondering about the possibility of stories in the late 1940s that may have been translated and printed abroad yet the original English version became one of those mothballed stories that sat in DC's inventory files, some of which were published two or more decades later.

      Rich B.
    • Jon Glade
      That s hard to say for certain, Rich. I m certain no Justice Society stories or golden age Justice Society stories were published in Europe or Australia during
      Message 2 of 12 , Aug 6, 2010
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        That's hard to say for certain, Rich. I'm certain no Justice Society stories or golden age Justice Society stories were published in Europe or Australia during the war. Canada did not import American comics during the war (which started for them in early 1940) and that gave rise to native comics starring the likes of Nelvana, Freelance, Johnny Canuck, Canada Jack, Red Rogue, Thunderfist, the Penguin, the Crusaders, the Invisible Commando, and so on plus a lot of adventure series (cowboys were apparently very popular). Australia wound up with a situation that allowed new single issues but no new magazine series, so it become nearly impossible to track a couple of series which appeared under different titles over the course of two or three years. New Zealand's paper ration for their own nascent comics industry went to a fourteen year old boy who published irregular issues featuring his own characters. One Canadian company did make arrangements with Fawcett
        to have Canadian artist draw stories written by American writers, so there are some golden age Captain Marvel Jr. stories which have never been reprinted, probably a few of which aren't known about by American comics fans. The Canadian character Commander Steel was an outright near imitation of Captain Marvel. England had great access to back issues of American comics which were shipped to England during the war in great numbers as ballast, so they had no need for a reprint industry (and most Boys Own papers never skipped an issue or used American material). Australia was crazy about American comics following the War, and did reprint quite a few American series; when Catman was cancelled in the States, an Australian publisher introduced a character with the same name, and Manhunter wound up in his own book as a retired policeman who flew around the world in a private jet and fought evil wherever he found it.

        In the later fifties, DC used to brag that Superman appeared in something like a hundred plus countries published in eleven languages, but I've never seen anything that would indicate that the foreign reprints were of anything other than translated copies of stories only a few months old. Australian JSA fans would certainly know if any golden age JSA material or material featuring any JSA members was reprinted the war and I have never seen any of them mention it.

        The real mystery is what was published in South and Cental America, particularly Brasil. There was an unauthorised story which featured Captain Marvel searching for and finding the missing Human Torch, so Lord only knows what else was published their which ignored American copyrights. A South American character who imitated Sub-Mariner and who also became the Red Bat and whose girlfriend became the Purple Butterfly actually became a Disney character (he was a "hippy duck") in that he did appear in a very few liscensed Disney books in America and a wealth of comics in South and Central America and in Europe.

        Personally, I doubt there are any unknown foreign reprints of JSA or JSA related golden age material, but you're asking someone to prove a negative; it's almost impossible to prove when something didn't happen because you also need to prove when it didn't happen and where it didn't happen, and sometime why it didn't happen.

        --- On Fri, 8/6/10, earth1redbee <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

        > From: earth1redbee <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
        > Subject: [The Justice Society] JSA abroad?
        > To: thejusticesociety@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Friday, August 6, 2010, 2:36 PM
        > Last week I finished a memoir by an
        > author named Carlos Eire about growing up in Cuba in the
        > late 1950s.  He mentioned the periodic thrill of
        > receiving a Superman or especially a Batman comic from an
        > aunt.  I didn't get the impression that these were
        > comics printed in English, and I've certainly seen
        > Spanish-language DC comics from time to time over the
        > years.
        >
        > That made me wonder, do any of you know if All-Star Comics
        > (not All-Star Western) was ever published outside of the
        > U.S. and Canada, or were any JSA stories published abroad
        > through the mid-1950s under another title?  If not,
        > what about solo stories of JSA members?  I'm
        > particularly wondering about the possibility of stories in
        > the late 1940s that may have been translated and printed
        > abroad yet the original English version became one of those
        > mothballed stories that sat in DC's inventory files, some of
        > which were published two or more decades later.
        >
        > Rich B.
      • Wallyoeste
        You mean golden age comics? I guess the closest thing I ve seen is the Spanish Edition Greatest Golden Age Stories Ever Told from Editorial Zinco (a
        Message 3 of 12 , Aug 6, 2010
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          You mean golden age comics?
          I guess the closest thing I've seen is the Spanish Edition "Greatest Golden Age Stories Ever Told" from Editorial Zinco (a Publisher that no longer Exists).
          Planeta da Agostini is currently publishing the All-star Squadron in TPB, but other than that, I wouldn't know.
          In South America in seems that comic books started to arrive in the 50s with Far West stories, to the point where we started to produce our own far west stories. Later on Novaro brought DC Comics material (I've seen copies of Justice League, The Flash, Green Lantern, Superman, Batman, Detective Comics, Action Comics, world's Finest, Lois Lane, Jimmy Olsen, Strange adventures, House of Mystery, The Atom, Mystery in space, etc.). The oldest person i could ask is my uncle, and he used to collect Sunday Strips, he collected stories of Flash Gordon (Roldan el temerario), The Phantom (El Fatasma), Mandrake, and i guess that a few others that he doesn't remember.
           
          Esteban - "My plan is sheer elegance in its simplicity".
          --
          Comic Verso - http://cverso.blogspot.com
          Ocio Crónico - http://ociocronico.blogspot.com
          Sinapsis Literaria - http://tlitab.blogspot.com

          2010/8/6 earth1redbee <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
          Last week I finished a memoir by an author named Carlos Eire about growing up in Cuba in the late 1950s.  He mentioned the periodic thrill of receiving a Superman or especially a Batman comic from an aunt.  I didn't get the impression that these were comics printed in English, and I've certainly seen Spanish-language DC comics from time to time over the years.

          That made me wonder, do any of you know if All-Star Comics (not All-Star Western) was ever published outside of the U.S. and Canada, or were any JSA stories published abroad through the mid-1950s under another title?  If not, what about solo stories of JSA members?  I'm particularly wondering about the possibility of stories in the late 1940s that may have been translated and printed abroad yet the original English version became one of those mothballed stories that sat in DC's inventory files, some of which were published two or more decades later.

          Rich B.

        • earth1redbee
          ... Very interesting!! Do you know which came first, Batman s Penguin or Canada s? Were the Crusaders a JSA-like team, or do you know whether any of the
          Message 4 of 12 , Aug 7, 2010
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            --- Jon Glade <jfglade@...> wrote:

            > That's hard to say for certain, Rich. I'm certain no Justice
            > Society stories or golden age Justice Society stories were
            > published in Europe or Australia during the war. Canada did not
            > import American comics during the war (which started for them in
            > early 1940) and that gave rise to native comics starring the likes
            > of Nelvana, Freelance, Johnny Canuck, Canada Jack, Red Rogue,
            > Thunderfist, the Penguin, the Crusaders, the Invisible Commando,
            > and so on plus a lot of adventure series (cowboys were apparently
            > very popular).

            Very interesting!! Do you know which came first, Batman's Penguin or Canada's? Were the Crusaders a JSA-like team, or do you know whether any of the other heroes you named ever united like the JSA?

            > [snip] One Canadian company did make arrangements with Fawcett
            > to have Canadian artist draw stories written by American writers,
            > so there are some golden age Captain Marvel Jr. stories which have > never been reprinted, probably a few of which aren't known about by
            > American comics fans.

            Hmmm, sounds like us fans of the Golden Age need to connect with the Canadian Jerry Bails...

            > The Canadian character Commander Steel was an outright near
            > imitation of Captain Marvel.

            Also interesting. I assume it was Roy Thomas who took the 1970s retcon Steel and named him Commander Steel, but if so, I don't recall Roy (in his usual detailed manner in letter columns) mentioning an earlier use of the name.

            > [snip] Australia was crazy about American comics following the War, > and did reprint quite a few American series; when Catman was
            > cancelled in the States, an Australian publisher introduced a
            > character with the same name, and Manhunter wound up in his own
            > book as a retired policeman who flew around the world in a private > jet and fought evil wherever he found it.

            Do you mean DC's Manhunter, Paul Kirk, or Quality's, Dan Richards?
            >
            > [snip] The real mystery is what was published in South and Cental
            > America, particularly Brasil. There was an unauthorised story which > featured Captain Marvel searching for and finding the missing Human
            > Torch, so Lord only knows what else was published their which
            > ignored American copyrights.

            Boy oh boy, that would be a fascinating story to see reprinted, especially if translated into English.

            > [snip] Personally, I doubt there are any unknown foreign reprints
            > of JSA or JSA related golden age material, but you're asking
            > someone to prove a negative; it's almost impossible to prove when
            > something didn't happen because you also need to prove when it
            > didn't happen and where it didn't happen, and sometime why it
            > didn't happen.

            I completely understand about proving a negative, and I certainly didn't ask my question optimistically. However, posing it yielded a goldmine of insight in a somewhat different direction, thanks! Meanwhile, Estaban replied:

            > You mean golden age comics?

            Yes, primarily. I have at least one silver age DC comic around here somewhere that isn't in English, so I'm wondering whether the practice of translating DC stories (and even All-American ones) might date back to before 1952, when JSA heroes could have been in the mix.

            > I guess the closest thing I've seen is the Spanish
            > Edition "Greatest Golden Age Stories Ever Told" from Editorial
            > Zinco (a Publisher that no longer Exists).

            Is that merely the relatively recent DC hardcover translated?

            > Planeta da Agostini is currently publishing the All-star Squadron
            > in TPB, but other than that, I wouldn't know.
            > In South America in seems that comic books started to arrive in the
            > 50s with Far West stories, to the point where we started to produce > our own far west stories. Later on Novaro brought DC Comics
            > material (I've seen copies of Justice League, The Flash, Green
            > Lantern, Superman, Batman, Detective Comics, Action Comics, world's
            > Finest, Lois Lane, Jimmy Olsen, Strange adventures, House of
            > Mystery, The Atom, Mystery in space, etc.). The oldest person i
            > could ask is my uncle, and he used to collect Sunday Strips, he
            > collected stories of Flash Gordon (Roldan el temerario), The
            > Phantom (El Fatasma), Mandrake, and i guess that a few others that
            > he doesn't remember.

            Sounds like in addition to tracking down the Canadian Jerry Bails, we need to connect with the Latin American Roy Thomas! Esteban, thanks for the information.

            > --- On Fri, 8/6/10, earth1redbee wrote:
            >
            > > From: earth1redbee <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
            > > Subject: [The Justice Society] JSA abroad?
            > > To: thejusticesociety@yahoogroups.com
            > > Date: Friday, August 6, 2010, 2:36 PM
            > > Last week I finished a memoir by an
            > > author named Carlos Eire about growing up in Cuba in the
            > > late 1950s.  He mentioned the periodic thrill of
            > > receiving a Superman or especially a Batman comic from an
            > > aunt.  I didn't get the impression that these were
            > > comics printed in English, and I've certainly seen
            > > Spanish-language DC comics from time to time over the
            > > years.
            > >
            > > That made me wonder, do any of you know if All-Star Comics
            > > (not All-Star Western) was ever published outside of the
            > > U.S. and Canada, or were any JSA stories published abroad
            > > through the mid-1950s under another title?  If not,
            > > what about solo stories of JSA members?  I'm
            > > particularly wondering about the possibility of stories in
            > > the late 1940s that may have been translated and printed
            > > abroad yet the original English version became one of those
            > > mothballed stories that sat in DC's inventory files, some of
            > > which were published two or more decades later.
            > >
            > > Rich B.
            >
          • Wallyoeste
            Now that I recall... I think that the Golden Age Superman was published in Spain as El Ciclon , but I ve been looking for that at google for the last half
            Message 5 of 12 , Aug 7, 2010
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              Now that I recall... I think that the Golden Age Superman was published in Spain as "El Ciclon", but I've been looking for that at google for the last half hour, and I can't find anything. I remember that I read something like that but I can't remember where.

              The Book published in Spain was this one:

              And last but not least, my name is "Esteban" which is the spanish version of "Steven" or "Stephen". 


              Esteban - "My plan is sheer elegance in its simplicity".
              --
              Comic Verso - http://cverso.blogspot.com
              Ocio Crónico - http://ociocronico.blogspot.com
              Sinapsis Literaria - http://tlitab.blogspot.com


              2010/8/7 earth1redbee <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
              --- Jon Glade <jfglade@...> wrote:

              > That's hard to say for certain, Rich. I'm certain no Justice
              > Society stories or golden age Justice Society stories were
              > published in Europe or Australia during the war. Canada did not
              > import American comics during the war (which started for them in
              > early 1940) and that gave rise to native comics starring the likes
              > of Nelvana, Freelance, Johnny Canuck, Canada Jack, Red Rogue,
              > Thunderfist, the Penguin, the Crusaders, the Invisible Commando,
              > and so on plus a lot of adventure series (cowboys were apparently
              > very popular).

              Very interesting!!  Do you know which came first, Batman's Penguin or Canada's?  Were the Crusaders a JSA-like team, or do you know whether any of the other heroes you named ever united like the JSA?

              > [snip] One Canadian company did make arrangements with Fawcett
              > to have Canadian artist draw stories written by American writers,
              > so there are some golden age Captain Marvel Jr. stories which have > never been reprinted, probably a few of which aren't known about by
              > American comics fans.

              Hmmm, sounds like us fans of the Golden Age need to connect with the Canadian Jerry Bails...

              > The Canadian character Commander Steel was an outright near
              > imitation of Captain Marvel.

              Also interesting.  I assume it was Roy Thomas who took the 1970s retcon Steel and named him Commander Steel, but if so, I don't recall Roy (in his usual detailed manner in letter columns) mentioning an earlier use of the name.

              > [snip] Australia was crazy about American comics following the War, > and did reprint quite a few American series; when Catman was
              > cancelled in the States, an Australian publisher introduced a
              > character with the same name, and Manhunter wound up in his own
              > book as a retired policeman who flew around the world in a private > jet and fought evil wherever he found it.

              Do you mean DC's Manhunter, Paul Kirk, or Quality's, Dan Richards?
              >
              > [snip] The real mystery is what was published in South and Cental
              > America, particularly Brasil. There was an unauthorised story which > featured Captain Marvel searching for and finding the missing Human
              > Torch, so Lord only knows what else was published their which
              > ignored American copyrights.

              Boy oh boy, that would be a fascinating story to see reprinted, especially if translated into English.

              > [snip] Personally, I doubt there are any unknown foreign reprints
              > of JSA or JSA related golden age material, but you're asking
              > someone to prove a negative; it's almost impossible to prove when
              > something didn't happen because you also need to prove when it
              > didn't happen and where it didn't happen, and sometime why it
              > didn't happen.

              I completely understand about proving a negative, and I certainly didn't ask my question optimistically.  However, posing it yielded a goldmine of insight in a somewhat different direction, thanks!  Meanwhile, Estaban replied:

              > You mean golden age comics?

              Yes, primarily.  I have at least one silver age DC comic around here somewhere that isn't in English, so I'm wondering whether the practice of translating DC stories (and even All-American ones) might date back to before 1952, when JSA heroes could have been in the mix.

              > I guess the closest thing I've seen is the Spanish
              > Edition "Greatest Golden Age Stories Ever Told" from Editorial
              > Zinco (a Publisher that no longer Exists).

              Is that merely the relatively recent DC hardcover translated?

              > Planeta da Agostini is currently publishing the All-star Squadron
              > in TPB, but other than that, I wouldn't know.
              > In South America in seems that comic books started to arrive in the
              > 50s with Far West stories, to the point where we started to produce > our own far west stories. Later on Novaro brought DC Comics
              > material (I've seen copies of Justice League, The Flash, Green
              > Lantern, Superman, Batman, Detective Comics, Action Comics, world's
              > Finest, Lois Lane, Jimmy Olsen, Strange adventures, House of
              > Mystery, The Atom, Mystery in space, etc.). The oldest person i
              > could ask is my uncle, and he used to collect Sunday Strips, he
              > collected stories of Flash Gordon (Roldan el temerario), The
              > Phantom (El Fatasma), Mandrake, and i guess that a few others that
              > he doesn't remember.

              Sounds like in addition to tracking down the Canadian Jerry Bails, we need to connect with the Latin American Roy Thomas!  Esteban, thanks for the information.

              > --- On Fri, 8/6/10, earth1redbee wrote:
              >
              > > From: earth1redbee <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
              > > Subject: [The Justice Society] JSA abroad?
              > > To: thejusticesociety@yahoogroups.com
              > > Date: Friday, August 6, 2010, 2:36 PM
              > > Last week I finished a memoir by an
              > > author named Carlos Eire about growing up in Cuba in the
              > > late 1950s.  He mentioned the periodic thrill of
              > > receiving a Superman or especially a Batman comic from an
              > > aunt.  I didn't get the impression that these were
              > > comics printed in English, and I've certainly seen
              > > Spanish-language DC comics from time to time over the
              > > years.
              > >
              > > That made me wonder, do any of you know if All-Star Comics
              > > (not All-Star Western) was ever published outside of the
              > > U.S. and Canada, or were any JSA stories published abroad
              > > through the mid-1950s under another title?  If not,
              > > what about solo stories of JSA members?  I'm
              > > particularly wondering about the possibility of stories in
              > > the late 1940s that may have been translated and printed
              > > abroad yet the original English version became one of those
              > > mothballed stories that sat in DC's inventory files, some of
              > > which were published two or more decades later.
              > >
              > > Rich B.
            • earth1redbee
              ... I m sorry for the typo the first time, though at least I didn t type incorrectly the second time. I m usually much more careful than that. Rich B.
              Message 6 of 12 , Aug 7, 2010
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                >
                > And last but not least, my name is "Esteban" which is the spanish
                > version of "Steven" or "Stephen".

                I'm sorry for the typo the first time, though at least I didn't type incorrectly the second time. I'm usually much more careful than that.

                Rich B.
              • Wallyoeste
                I found a history of Editorial Novaro (in spanish) http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Editorial_Novaro It says that this Publisher started to publish its material in
                Message 7 of 12 , Aug 7, 2010
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                  I found a history of Editorial Novaro (in spanish)

                  It says that this Publisher started to publish its material in 1949 and that the first "american" (I hate to use that word to signal anything coming from the United States of America, since to me America is a continent) comic book they published was Superman #73 from 1951 in comic book format as "Supermán #1" (1952).

                  My father knew this Publisher by 2 of its names "Ediciones Modernas" and "Editorial Novaro".


                  Esteban - "My plan is sheer elegance in its simplicity".
                  --
                  Comic Verso - http://cverso.blogspot.com
                  Ocio Crónico - http://ociocronico.blogspot.com
                  Sinapsis Literaria - http://tlitab.blogspot.com


                  2010/8/7 Wallyoeste <wallyoeste@...>
                  Now that I recall... I think that the Golden Age Superman was published in Spain as "El Ciclon", but I've been looking for that at google for the last half hour, and I can't find anything. I remember that I read something like that but I can't remember where.

                  The Book published in Spain was this one:

                  And last but not least, my name is "Esteban" which is the spanish version of "Steven" or "Stephen". 


                  Esteban - "My plan is sheer elegance in its simplicity".
                  --
                  Comic Verso - http://cverso.blogspot.com
                  Ocio Crónico - http://ociocronico.blogspot.com
                  Sinapsis Literaria - http://tlitab.blogspot.com

                • Wallyoeste
                  No problem, is a common mistake, but it bugs me because estaban is the past tense of the verb to be in spanish. BTW I found the Gold.
                  Message 8 of 12 , Aug 7, 2010
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                    No problem, is a common mistake, but it bugs me because "estaban" is the past tense of the verb "to be" in spanish.

                    BTW I found the Gold.

                    This is a famous website because the author is absolutely crazy (in a good way... I think - Mariano Bayona), he's got what is probably the most thorough database of Superman comics in spanish. But is also a very old website, so it was designed back in the mid 90's.

                    It says that Superman was published in Spain as "Ciclón el Superhombre" (Cyclon, the Superman) by "Hispano Americana de Ediciones S.A." (Barcelona, Spain) within a book called  "Las Grandes Obras Modernas" (umm... "Modern Masterpieces", could be a non-so literal but good translation)

                    The article says that the political situation of the time induced a change in the name of the character and the color of his costume (Spain under Franco's dictatorship). It seems that they published Superman's daily strips.

                    As far as I can tell from these articles, it seems that the comic book format was a true innovation introduced by Editorial Novaro, and it seems that it was a big part of their success as it allowed them to distribute their books all over South America and Spain.


                    Esteban - "My plan is sheer elegance in its simplicity".
                    --
                    Comic Verso - http://cverso.blogspot.com
                    Ocio Crónico - http://ociocronico.blogspot.com
                    Sinapsis Literaria - http://tlitab.blogspot.com


                    2010/8/7 earth1redbee <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
                    >
                    > >
                    > > And last but not least, my name is "Esteban" which is the spanish
                    > > version of "Steven" or "Stephen".
                    >
                    > I'm sorry for the typo the first time, though at least I didn't type incorrectly the second time.  I'm usually much more careful than that.
                    >
                    > Rich B.
                  • Jon Glade
                    ... ...  Do you know which came first, Batman s Penguin or Canada s?  Were the Crusaders a JSA-like team, or do you know whether any of the other heroes you
                    Message 9 of 12 , Aug 7, 2010
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                      --- On Sat, 8/7/10, earth1redbee <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                      ...  Do you know which came first,
                      Batman's Penguin or Canada's?  Were the Crusaders a
                      JSA-like team, or do you know whether any of the other
                      heroes you named ever united like the JSA?

                      The Canadian Penguin was published first by something like three to five monthss (depending on how far ahead the were dated). The two characters didn't look alike, save in that they both wore tuxedoes. The Canadian Penguin wore a full head mask that looked like a penguin head; he carried a gun and was more like a pulp magazine character than a comics character. His true identity was never revealed and anyone who saw his face died.

                      The Crusaders were two ordinary men who had a rocket ship (how or why I have no idea) and fought the Axis (usually the Germans).

                      I'm pretty sure that there wasn't even a team-up of two Canadian characters until the sixties, let alone a team. The characters I mentioned were from four different publishers, so they weren't likely to be teamed up. Eventually, a small Canadian publisher (there weren't any other kind after the fifties) did publish a book featuring a team, Northguard, in the late 70s or early 80s, and I believe it was a relatively short lived book.
                      >

                      > > The Canadian character Commander Steel was an outright
                      > near imitation of Captain Marvel.
                      >
                      > Also interesting.  I assume it was Roy Thomas who took
                      > the 1970s retcon Steel and named him Commander Steel, but if
                      > so, I don't recall Roy (in his usual detailed manner in
                      > letter columns) mentioning an earlier use of the name.

                      I've often wondered that myself, but Canadian comics weren't sold in the States, so I find it difficult to believe that he knew about Commander Steel. The fact that Thomas didn't mention the earlier Commander Steel also makes me think he probably didn't. Then again, I've never seen him acknowledge that Street & Smith had a character named "Iron Munro" (not a superhero but spaceman).
                      >

                      > > [snip] Australia was crazy about American comics
                      > following the War, > and did reprint quite a few American
                      > series; when Catman was cancelled in the States, an Australian publisher
                      > introduced a character with the same name, and Manhunter wound up
                      > in his own book as a retired policeman who flew around the world
                      > in a private jet and fought evil wherever he found it.
                      >
                      > Do you mean DC's Manhunter, Paul Kirk, or Quality's, Dan
                      > Richards?

                      Dan Richards. I thought the reference to "retired policeman" was clear enough but you wouldn't know if they had tinkered with Paul Kirk or not, so I should have been more clear.
                      > >

                      > > [snip] The real mystery is what was published in South
                      > and Cental
                      > > America, particularly Brasil. There was an
                      > unauthorised story which > featured Captain Marvel
                      > searching for and finding the missing Human
                      > > Torch, so Lord only knows what else was published
                      > their which
                      > > ignored American copyrights.
                      >
                      > Boy oh boy, that would be a fascinating story to see
                      > reprinted, especially if translated into English.
                      >
                      Someone was (slowly) translating the story and using a computer program to color it (the original, like many foreign comics, was in black and white). I don't know if that project was ever completed or not. Last I knew only three of the nineteen or so pages were completed.
                    • Robert Kennedy
                      ... SNIP   Australia was crazy about American comics following the War, and did reprint quite a few American series; when Catman was cancelled in the States,
                      Message 10 of 12 , Aug 9, 2010
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                        --- On Fri, 8/6/10, Jon Glade <jfglade@...> wrote:

                        SNIP
                         
                        Australia was crazy about American comics following the War, and did reprint quite a few American series; when Catman was cancelled in the States, an Australian publisher introduced a character with the same name, and Manhunter wound up in his own book as a retired policeman who flew around the world in a private jet and fought evil wherever he found it.

                         
                        SNIP

                        In the later fifties, DC used to brag that Superman appeared in something like a hundred plus countries published in eleven languages, but I've never seen anything that would indicate that the foreign reprints were of anything other than translated copies of stories only a few months old. Australian JSA fans would certainly know if any golden age JSA material or material featuring any JSA members was reprinted the war and I have never seen any of them mention it.
                        Jon,
                         
                        I have to mostly agree about the Aussie reprints. But they did reprint a fair amount of Quality Comics Golden Age material. The relatively short lived Captain Triumph had his own title in addition to Manhunter.
                         
                        The only Aussie U.S. reprints I have are Colossal Comics. These 100++ pagers (from the late 1950's, I think) pretty much ignored what had been the All-American wing of DC. But, they did reprint a lot of stuff from the late 1940's to the mid-50's. I picked up some for the Paul Norris looking Aquaman, Green Arrow & Johnny Quick stories not likely to ever see print again in the U.S. Lots of other good stuff, as well.

                        Jim Anthony Super-Detective Vol. 1
                        Three wild illustrated prose adventures.
                        Now on sale at Amazon.com
                        Sample chapter here. 

                      • jfglade
                        The only Australian reprint comics I have are a couple of issues featuring Disney comics, a few early Phantom stories which were reprinted by Frew, and a few
                        Message 11 of 12 , Aug 15, 2010
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                          The only Australian reprint comics I have are a couple of issues featuring Disney comics, a few early Phantom stories which were reprinted by Frew, and a few oversized issues of the short-lived Panther reprint series. I was confident that there were no golden age Justice Society reprints, or reprints of golden age DC or All-American material, especially stories which had never been published in America which is the original question in this thread. There are quite a few Austrailian Justice Society fans (one of the first four monitors here was from Australia and he ran an website, unfortunately now defunct, which was about the golden age Justice Society, and there were at least two other Aussie members who knew a great deal about the golden age Justice Society; I was almost positive that such reprints didn't exist or that no inventory stories which weren't published in America would have found thaeir way into Australian comics, otherwise those Aussie fans would have known about it.

                          I wasn't aware that there had been an Australian Captain Triumph books, short-lived or otherwise. On good days, I learn something new.

                          --- In thejusticesociety@yahoogroups.com, Robert Kennedy <erwin_k_r@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > --- On Fri, 8/6/10, Jon Glade <jfglade@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > SNIP
                          >
                          >  
                          > Australia was crazy about American comics following the War, and did reprint quite a few American series; when Catman was cancelled in the States, an Australian publisher introduced a character with the same name, and Manhunter wound up in his own book as a retired policeman who flew around the world in a private jet and fought evil wherever he found it.
                          >
                          >  
                          > SNIP
                          >
                          > In the later fifties, DC used to brag that Superman appeared in something like a hundred plus countries published in eleven languages, but I've never seen anything that would indicate that the foreign reprints were of anything other than translated copies of stories only a few months old. Australian JSA fans would certainly know if any golden age JSA material or material featuring any JSA members was reprinted the war and I have never seen any of them mention it.
                          Jon,
                           
                          I have to mostly agree about the Aussie reprints. But they did reprint a fair amount of Quality Comics Golden Age material. The relatively short lived Captain Triumph had his own title in addition to Manhunter.
                           
                          The only Aussie U.S. reprints I have are Colossal Comics. These 100++ pagers (from the late 1950's, I think) pretty much ignored what had been the All-American wing of DC. But, they did reprint a lot of stuff from the late 1940's to the mid-50's. I picked up some for the Paul Norris looking Aquaman, Green Arrow & Johnny Quick stories not likely to ever see print again in the U.S. Lots of other good stuff, as well.
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