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Getting Things Done

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  • David Michael
    Has anyone implemented David Allen s Getting Things Done (GTD) method in The Journal? And would you be willing to share how you did it??? =) I ve had a
    Message 1 of 9 , May 2, 2007
      Has anyone implemented David Allen's "Getting Things Done" (GTD) method
      in The Journal?

      And would you be willing to share how you did it??? =)

      I've had a handful of requests for enhancements to The Journal to better
      support GTD, so this past week I took some time to actually read the
      book. I started putting together a collection of categories and
      templates to make it easier to use GTD in The Journal, but I've hit a
      snag: I really can't give instructions on how to use the categories and
      templates without almost certainly running afoul of copyright laws or
      intellectual property, or something equally dreadful.

      Still, I can describe what I have in mind. If anyone has suggestions for
      other ways to do it, including how they do it, feel free to chip in.

      I created a master category "Getting Things Done" (loose-leaf, folder
      only). Under that, I created these sub-categories:
      * "What's Next" (loose-leaf)
      * "Calendar" (standard)
      * "Projects" (loose-leaf)
      * "Reference" (loose-leaf)
      * "GTD Templates" (loose-leaf).

      In "What's Next", I created these entries:
      * In - to serve as a sort of freeform inbox
      * Next Actions - as the master list of next actions (I also created
      sub-entries for this called "Calls", "At Computer", "Errands", "At
      Office", "At Home", "Agendas" and "Read/Review")
      * Waiting For
      * Projects - to be a sort quick-reference for the projects that would be
      in the "Projects" category
      * Someday/Maybe - for those "incubator" and blue-sky ideas/tasks

      The Calendar category would be where you created time-specific and
      all-day reminders. And you could use it to jot journal/diary thoughts if
      you wanted.

      The Projects category would be where you could create detailed project
      descriptions, and organize them.

      The Reference category would be a freeform catchall of digital
      information. I even loaded up top-level entries A through Z to help
      organize it some.

      And GTD Templates is for storing handy templates. The ones I created
      were for "Next Actions" and "Waiting For". These were formatted tables
      that could be quickly inserted and then moved around (with
      copy-and-paste or drag-and-drop) as needed.

      If you're familiar with GTD, maybe what I was trying to accomplish is
      obvious. But I'm not sure. ;-) I've not used GTD extensively, so I'm
      trying to follow the blueprint given in the book, within the
      constraints/abilities of The Journal.

      Thoughts, anyone?

      -David
    • Shelby
      I use it for GTD, but I believe I have kept it fairly simple. I have a Next Actions tab; a Someday tab; a Projects tab for current projects and future
      Message 2 of 9 , May 3, 2007
        I use it for GTD, but I believe I have kept it fairly simple. I have a
        "Next Actions" tab; a "Someday" tab; a "Projects" tab for current
        projects and future projects go under the Someday tab; I then break
        down by project and have "references" in them; and of course, I use
        the calendar extensively, though I have to use a different calendar at
        my full-time job I still use the journal for my small business,
        schooling, and home life.

        Works great for me!

        BUT, your point about copyright does bring up interesting points.
        Before implementing it, I'd check with them because they will probably
        say it is an infringement and would want a share, but that's better
        than a lawsuit... IMHO :-) I'd hate to see someone who has worked so
        hard to create a good, solid project suffer needlessly, especially
        when you're only trying to help!

        Best wishes,
        Shelby


        --- In thejournal-users@yahoogroups.com, David Michael <davidrm@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Has anyone implemented David Allen's "Getting Things Done" (GTD) method
        > in The Journal?
        >
        > And would you be willing to share how you did it??? =)
        >
        > I've had a handful of requests for enhancements to The Journal to
        better
        > support GTD, so this past week I took some time to actually read the
        > book. I started putting together a collection of categories and
        > templates to make it easier to use GTD in The Journal, but I've hit a
        > snag: I really can't give instructions on how to use the categories and
        > templates without almost certainly running afoul of copyright laws or
        > intellectual property, or something equally dreadful.
        >
        > Still, I can describe what I have in mind. If anyone has suggestions
        for
        > other ways to do it, including how they do it, feel free to chip in.
        >
        > I created a master category "Getting Things Done" (loose-leaf, folder
        > only). Under that, I created these sub-categories:
        > * "What's Next" (loose-leaf)
        > * "Calendar" (standard)
        > * "Projects" (loose-leaf)
        > * "Reference" (loose-leaf)
        > * "GTD Templates" (loose-leaf).
        >
        > In "What's Next", I created these entries:
        > * In - to serve as a sort of freeform inbox
        > * Next Actions - as the master list of next actions (I also created
        > sub-entries for this called "Calls", "At Computer", "Errands", "At
        > Office", "At Home", "Agendas" and "Read/Review")
        > * Waiting For
        > * Projects - to be a sort quick-reference for the projects that
        would be
        > in the "Projects" category
        > * Someday/Maybe - for those "incubator" and blue-sky ideas/tasks
        >
        > The Calendar category would be where you created time-specific and
        > all-day reminders. And you could use it to jot journal/diary
        thoughts if
        > you wanted.
        >
        > The Projects category would be where you could create detailed project
        > descriptions, and organize them.
        >
        > The Reference category would be a freeform catchall of digital
        > information. I even loaded up top-level entries A through Z to help
        > organize it some.
        >
        > And GTD Templates is for storing handy templates. The ones I created
        > were for "Next Actions" and "Waiting For". These were formatted tables
        > that could be quickly inserted and then moved around (with
        > copy-and-paste or drag-and-drop) as needed.
        >
        > If you're familiar with GTD, maybe what I was trying to accomplish is
        > obvious. But I'm not sure. ;-) I've not used GTD extensively, so I'm
        > trying to follow the blueprint given in the book, within the
        > constraints/abilities of The Journal.
        >
        > Thoughts, anyone?
        >
        > -David
        >
      • K U
        My inbox is obviously not kept empty! I just read this and would love to hear more. Have copyrights stopped progress on these ideas? I would love to see these
        Message 3 of 9 , Jun 4 10:23 PM
          My inbox is obviously not kept empty! I just read this and would love to
          hear more. Have copyrights stopped progress on these ideas? I would love to
          see these features added.
          Just looking for an update,
          Kim


          >
          >Has anyone implemented David Allen's "Getting Things Done" (GTD) method
          >in The Journal?
          >
          >And would you be willing to share how you did it??? =)
          >
          >I've had a handful of requests for enhancements to The Journal to better
          >support GTD, so this past week I took some time to actually read the
          >book. I started putting together a collection of categories and
          >templates to make it easier to use GTD in The Journal, but I've hit a
          >snag: I really can't give instructions on how to use the categories and
          >templates without almost certainly running afoul of copyright laws or
          >intellectual property, or something equally dreadful.
          >
          >Still, I can describe what I have in mind. If anyone has suggestions for
          >other ways to do it, including how they do it, feel free to chip in.
          >
          >I created a master category "Getting Things Done" (loose-leaf, folder
          >only). Under that, I created these sub-categories:
          >* "What's Next" (loose-leaf)
          >* "Calendar" (standard)
          >* "Projects" (loose-leaf)
          >* "Reference" (loose-leaf)
          >* "GTD Templates" (loose-leaf).
          >
          >In "What's Next", I created these entries:
          >* In - to serve as a sort of freeform inbox
          >* Next Actions - as the master list of next actions (I also created
          >sub-entries for this called "Calls", "At Computer", "Errands", "At
          >Office", "At Home", "Agendas" and "Read/Review")
          >* Waiting For
          >* Projects - to be a sort quick-reference for the projects that would be
          >in the "Projects" category
          >* Someday/Maybe - for those "incubator" and blue-sky ideas/tasks
          >
          >The Calendar category would be where you created time-specific and
          >all-day reminders. And you could use it to jot journal/diary thoughts if
          >you wanted.
          >
          >The Projects category would be where you could create detailed project
          >descriptions, and organize them.
          >
          >The Reference category would be a freeform catchall of digital
          >information. I even loaded up top-level entries A through Z to help
          >organize it some.
          >
          >And GTD Templates is for storing handy templates. The ones I created
          >were for "Next Actions" and "Waiting For". These were formatted tables
          >that could be quickly inserted and then moved around (with
          >copy-and-paste or drag-and-drop) as needed.
          >
          >If you're familiar with GTD, maybe what I was trying to accomplish is
          >obvious. But I'm not sure. ;-) I've not used GTD extensively, so I'm
          >trying to follow the blueprint given in the book, within the
          >constraints/abilities of The Journal.
          >
          >Thoughts, anyone?
          >
          >-David

          _________________________________________________________________
          Need a break? Find your escape route with Live Search Maps.
          http://maps.live.com/default.aspx?ss=Restaurants~Hotels~Amusement%20Park&cp=33.832922~-117.915659&style=r&lvl=13&tilt=-90&dir=0&alt=-1000&scene=1118863&encType=1&FORM=MGAC01
        • Ivy Crow
          Ditto what Kim said. Never heard of the GTD method but sounds like something I might gel with! Elle ... From: K U Date: 05/06/2007 06:25:55 To:
          Message 4 of 9 , Jun 4 11:10 PM
            Ditto what Kim said. Never heard of the GTD method but sounds like
            something I might gel with!

            Elle

            -------Original Message-------

            From: K U
            Date: 05/06/2007 06:25:55
            To: thejournal-users@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE: [thejournal-users] Getting Things Done

            My inbox is obviously not kept empty! I just read this and would love to
            hear more. Have copyrights stopped progress on these ideas? I would love to
            see these features added.
            Just looking for an update,
            Kim

            >
            >Has anyone implemented David Allen's "Getting Things Done" (GTD) method
            >in The Journal?
            >
            >And would you be willing to share how you did it??? =)
            >
            >I've had a handful of requests for enhancements to The Journal to better
            >support GTD, so this past week I took some time to actually read the
            >book. I started putting together a collection of categories and
            >templates to make it easier to use GTD in The Journal, but I've hit a
            >snag: I really can't give instructions on how to use the categories and
            >templates without almost certainly running afoul of copyright laws or
            >intellectual property, or something equally dreadful.
            >
            >Still, I can describe what I have in mind. If anyone has suggestions for
            >other ways to do it, including how they do it, feel free to chip in.
            >
            >I created a master category "Getting Things Done" (loose-leaf, folder
            >only). Under that, I created these sub-categories:
            >* "What's Next" (loose-leaf)
            >* "Calendar" (standard)
            >* "Projects" (loose-leaf)
            >* "Reference" (loose-leaf)
            >* "GTD Templates" (loose-leaf).
            >
            >In "What's Next", I created these entries:
            >* In - to serve as a sort of freeform inbox
            >* Next Actions - as the master list of next actions (I also created
            >sub-entries for this called "Calls", "At Computer", "Errands", "At
            >Office", "At Home", "Agendas" and "Read/Review")
            >* Waiting For
            >* Projects - to be a sort quick-reference for the projects that would be
            >in the "Projects" category
            >* Someday/Maybe - for those "incubator" and blue-sky ideas/tasks
            >
            >The Calendar category would be where you created time-specific and
            >all-day reminders. And you could use it to jot journal/diary thoughts if
            >you wanted.
            >
            >The Projects category would be where you could create detailed project
            >descriptions, and organize them.
            >
            >The Reference category would be a freeform catchall of digital
            >information. I even loaded up top-level entries A through Z to help
            >organize it some.
            >
            >And GTD Templates is for storing handy templates. The ones I created
            >were for "Next Actions" and "Waiting For". These were formatted tables
            >that could be quickly inserted and then moved around (with
            >copy-and-paste or drag-and-drop) as needed.
            >
            >If you're familiar with GTD, maybe what I was trying to accomplish is
            >obvious. But I'm not sure. ;-) I've not used GTD extensively, so I'm
            >trying to follow the blueprint given in the book, within the
            >constraints/abilities of The Journal.
            >
            >Thoughts, anyone?
            >
            >-David

            __________________________________________________________
            Need a break? Find your escape route with Live Search Maps.
            http://maps.live.com/default
            aspx?ss=Restaurants~Hotels~Amusement%20Park&cp=33.832922~-117
            915659&style=r&lvl=13&tilt=-90&dir=0&alt=-1000&scene=1118863&encType=1&FORM=M
            AC01





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • David Michael
            Sometime in the next month or so I ll get the package in a usable state and make it available for free. I recommend buying the book, Getting Things Done ,
            Message 5 of 9 , Jun 5 3:46 PM
              Sometime in the next month or so I'll get the package in a usable state
              and make it available for free.

              I recommend buying the book, "Getting Things Done", though, if you
              haven't already. Or check it out from the library. That way I don't have
              to write a help file... ;-)

              -David

              K U wrote:
              > My inbox is obviously not kept empty! I just read this and would love to
              > hear more. Have copyrights stopped progress on these ideas? I would love to
              > see these features added.
              > Just looking for an update,
              > Kim
              >
              >
              >
              >> Has anyone implemented David Allen's "Getting Things Done" (GTD) method
              >> in The Journal?
              >>
              >> And would you be willing to share how you did it??? =)
              >>
              >> I've had a handful of requests for enhancements to The Journal to better
              >> support GTD, so this past week I took some time to actually read the
              >> book. I started putting together a collection of categories and
              >> templates to make it easier to use GTD in The Journal, but I've hit a
              >> snag: I really can't give instructions on how to use the categories and
              >> templates without almost certainly running afoul of copyright laws or
              >> intellectual property, or something equally dreadful.
              >>
              >> Still, I can describe what I have in mind. If anyone has suggestions for
              >> other ways to do it, including how they do it, feel free to chip in.
              >>
              >> I created a master category "Getting Things Done" (loose-leaf, folder
              >> only). Under that, I created these sub-categories:
              >> * "What's Next" (loose-leaf)
              >> * "Calendar" (standard)
              >> * "Projects" (loose-leaf)
              >> * "Reference" (loose-leaf)
              >> * "GTD Templates" (loose-leaf).
              >>
              >> In "What's Next", I created these entries:
              >> * In - to serve as a sort of freeform inbox
              >> * Next Actions - as the master list of next actions (I also created
              >> sub-entries for this called "Calls", "At Computer", "Errands", "At
              >> Office", "At Home", "Agendas" and "Read/Review")
              >> * Waiting For
              >> * Projects - to be a sort quick-reference for the projects that would be
              >> in the "Projects" category
              >> * Someday/Maybe - for those "incubator" and blue-sky ideas/tasks
              >>
              >> The Calendar category would be where you created time-specific and
              >> all-day reminders. And you could use it to jot journal/diary thoughts if
              >> you wanted.
              >>
              >> The Projects category would be where you could create detailed project
              >> descriptions, and organize them.
              >>
              >> The Reference category would be a freeform catchall of digital
              >> information. I even loaded up top-level entries A through Z to help
              >> organize it some.
              >>
              >> And GTD Templates is for storing handy templates. The ones I created
              >> were for "Next Actions" and "Waiting For". These were formatted tables
              >> that could be quickly inserted and then moved around (with
              >> copy-and-paste or drag-and-drop) as needed.
              >>
              >> If you're familiar with GTD, maybe what I was trying to accomplish is
              >> obvious. But I'm not sure. ;-) I've not used GTD extensively, so I'm
              >> trying to follow the blueprint given in the book, within the
              >> constraints/abilities of The Journal.
              >>
              >> Thoughts, anyone?
              >>
              >> -David
              >>
              >
              > _________________________________________________________________
              > Need a break? Find your escape route with Live Search Maps.
              > http://maps.live.com/default.aspx?ss=Restaurants~Hotels~Amusement%20Park&cp=33.832922~-117.915659&style=r&lvl=13&tilt=-90&dir=0&alt=-1000&scene=1118863&encType=1&FORM=MGAC01
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • Shelby
              This definitely sounds interesting. I really look forward to seeing what you create. The multiple entry idea sounds great too. I am constantly amazed by the
              Message 6 of 9 , Jun 5 5:37 PM
                This definitely sounds interesting. I really look forward to seeing
                what you create. The multiple entry idea sounds great too.

                I am constantly amazed by the high level of customer service you
                maintain and how you respond so well to user comments. I wish I had
                someone like you in my community to do training on customer service!
                It's so rewarding to encounter a product creator who remains involved
                AFTER the purchase.

                As always - thanks for an amazing product!

                Best wishes,
                Shelby


                --- In thejournal-users@yahoogroups.com, David Michael <davidrm@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Sometime in the next month or so I'll get the package in a usable
                state
                > and make it available for free.
                >
                > I recommend buying the book, "Getting Things Done", though, if you
                > haven't already. Or check it out from the library. That way I don't
                have
                > to write a help file... ;-)
                >
                > -David
              • v wang
                After attending GTD class, I don t feel it is a brand new technology or some revolutional methods but those process flows that we familiar with for a long
                Message 7 of 9 , Jun 5 6:43 PM
                  After attending GTD class, I don't feel it is a brand new technology or some revolutional methods but those process flows that we familiar with for a long time. The key is we need a nice tool to help us to track those details every day. I believe The Journal is the best tool that can apply GTD eventually.

                  But right now I just use couple boxes (such as: in-box, out-box, parking-box, history-box, reading-box, project-box, etc.) in Notebook category to tracking things by using copy/cut/paste with different font color and underlines. It is still a kind of paper based process. Please share your experiences if you have better suggestion to apply GTD in today's Journal.

                  Thanks,
                  Vince


                  ----- Original Message ----
                  From: David Michael <davidrm@...>
                  To: thejournal-users@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tuesday, June 5, 2007 3:46:12 PM
                  Subject: Re: [thejournal-users] Getting Things Done













                  Sometime in the next month or so I'll get the package in a usable state

                  and make it available for free.



                  I recommend buying the book, "Getting Things Done", though, if you

                  haven't already. Or check it out from the library. That way I don't have

                  to write a help file... ;-)



                  -David



                  K U wrote:

                  > My inbox is obviously not kept empty! I just read this and would love to

                  > hear more. Have copyrights stopped progress on these ideas? I would love to

                  > see these features added.

                  > Just looking for an update,

                  > Kim

                  >

                  >

                  >

                  >> Has anyone implemented David Allen's "Getting Things Done" (GTD) method

                  >> in The Journal?

                  >>

                  >> And would you be willing to share how you did it??? =)

                  >>

                  >> I've had a handful of requests for enhancements to The Journal to better

                  >> support GTD, so this past week I took some time to actually read the

                  >> book. I started putting together a collection of categories and

                  >> templates to make it easier to use GTD in The Journal, but I've hit a

                  >> snag: I really can't give instructions on how to use the categories and

                  >> templates without almost certainly running afoul of copyright laws or

                  >> intellectual property, or something equally dreadful.

                  >>

                  >> Still, I can describe what I have in mind. If anyone has suggestions for

                  >> other ways to do it, including how they do it, feel free to chip in.

                  >>

                  >> I created a master category "Getting Things Done" (loose-leaf, folder

                  >> only). Under that, I created these sub-categories:

                  >> * "What's Next" (loose-leaf)

                  >> * "Calendar" (standard)

                  >> * "Projects" (loose-leaf)

                  >> * "Reference" (loose-leaf)

                  >> * "GTD Templates" (loose-leaf) .

                  >>

                  >> In "What's Next", I created these entries:

                  >> * In - to serve as a sort of freeform inbox

                  >> * Next Actions - as the master list of next actions (I also created

                  >> sub-entries for this called "Calls", "At Computer", "Errands", "At

                  >> Office", "At Home", "Agendas" and "Read/Review" )

                  >> * Waiting For

                  >> * Projects - to be a sort quick-reference for the projects that would be

                  >> in the "Projects" category

                  >> * Someday/Maybe - for those "incubator" and blue-sky ideas/tasks

                  >>

                  >> The Calendar category would be where you created time-specific and

                  >> all-day reminders. And you could use it to jot journal/diary thoughts if

                  >> you wanted.

                  >>

                  >> The Projects category would be where you could create detailed project

                  >> descriptions, and organize them.

                  >>

                  >> The Reference category would be a freeform catchall of digital

                  >> information. I even loaded up top-level entries A through Z to help

                  >> organize it some.

                  >>

                  >> And GTD Templates is for storing handy templates. The ones I created

                  >> were for "Next Actions" and "Waiting For". These were formatted tables

                  >> that could be quickly inserted and then moved around (with

                  >> copy-and-paste or drag-and-drop) as needed.

                  >>

                  >> If you're familiar with GTD, maybe what I was trying to accomplish is

                  >> obvious. But I'm not sure. ;-) I've not used GTD extensively, so I'm

                  >> trying to follow the blueprint given in the book, within the

                  >> constraints/ abilities of The Journal.

                  >>

                  >> Thoughts, anyone?

                  >>

                  >> -David

                  >>

                  >

                  > ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _

                  > Need a break? Find your escape route with Live Search Maps.

                  > http://maps. live.com/ default.aspx? ss=Restaurants~ Hotels~Amusement %20Park&cp= 33.832922~ -117.915659& style=r&lvl= 13&tilt=- 90&dir=0& alt=-1000& scene=1118863& encType=1& FORM=MGAC01

                  >

                  >

                  >

                  >

                  > Yahoo! Groups Links

                  >

                  >

                  >

                  >

                  >












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                • K U
                  Oh thank you!! I read the book some months ago and am still looking for a workable planning tool. I have tried Outllook, but can t quite get the results i am
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jun 5 7:43 PM
                    Oh thank you!! I read the book some months ago and am still looking for a
                    workable planning tool. I have tried Outllook, but can't quite get the
                    results i am looking for. Paper is still a possibility, but there are too
                    many thoughts to keep track of and i like being able to move them around on
                    the computer.
                    I'm looking forward to trying it out!!
                    **first in line** ;-)
                    Kim

                    ps. I also recommend reading the book. I don't use it straight from the
                    book, but i have incorporated many of the ideas... at least i am trying to.
                    Finding a good fitting medium has been the most difficult part for me. (But
                    I haven't tackled the filing cabinet yet)


                    >
                    >Sometime in the next month or so I'll get the package in a usable state
                    >and make it available for free.
                    >
                    >I recommend buying the book, "Getting Things Done", though, if you
                    >haven't already. Or check it out from the library. That way I don't have
                    >to write a help file... ;-)
                    >
                    >-David
                    >
                    >K U wrote:
                    > > My inbox is obviously not kept empty! I just read this and would love to
                    > > hear more. Have copyrights stopped progress on these ideas? I would love
                    >to
                    > > see these features added.
                    > > Just looking for an update,
                    > > Kim
                    > >
                    > >

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                  • Crystal
                    I myself am just getting started with the Getting Things Done methodology, and haven t yet worked out my software approach to managinging it all. I started
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jun 13 6:54 AM
                      I myself am just getting started with the Getting Things Done
                      methodology, and haven't yet worked out my software approach to
                      managinging it all. I started talking about it in another thread:
                      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/thejournal-users/message/5037 , where I
                      mention a nice piece of software called ThinkingRock that does a very
                      good job of allowing flexible organization of actions and projects and
                      views. Here in this thread though, I want to talk more specifically
                      about how I think GTD can be addressed in The Journal.

                      Firstly, I see Getting Things Done as a way of life, not just
                      something that can be tacked on as an afterthought. I think David
                      Allen himself would say that the processes are more important than the
                      tools, and Leo at zenhabits.net would say that it is all about
                      developing good habits that will help you be successful at Getting
                      Things Done (as emphasized by his own variant: Zen To Done). I think
                      the best approach here is to incorporate the GTD methodology into a
                      person's existing Journal setup, instead of pigeonholing this
                      methodology into some new obscure section of The Journal that a person
                      may forget to look at.

                      Before I go on, let me say that I already use most of The Journal for
                      two very large conceptual things in the GTD methodology, and I did so
                      before I had even heard of GTD. These concepts are "Projects" and
                      "Reference". The idea of creating a category with either of these two
                      things as labels is almost as funny to me as saying that The Journal
                      is just a diary! :) My categories are more like subject headings,
                      organized in a way that I can easily use ALL of it as reference, even
                      the parts that are helping me plan my current and future (or
                      "someday/maybe") projects. All of my master categories have
                      sub-categories, and often sub-sub-categories, and I can find anything
                      I need to reference (or work on) very quickly. So that part of GTD is
                      already modelled!

                      It's also very easy to set up a Calendar to show the "Hard Landscape"
                      upon which the rest of the actions will be scattered. The Reminders
                      feature and the calendar charms make everything quite clear. So far,
                      so good.

                      Another important feature: the Inbox, aka the place to dump thoughts
                      without having to worry about how they're organized until you're ready
                      to go about processing them. This is surely best done in a single
                      Looseleaf page, to encourage the processing to occur regularly.
                      Process the thoughts by cutting and pasting into the subject where the
                      thought belongs, and if necessary, flesh it out more upon moving it.

                      Everything I've mentioned so far is, in my opinion, already really
                      obvious within The Journal. But there is one major aspect of GTD
                      that does not have an obvious implementation within The Journal:

                      How do we easily review projects and decide on the best Next Action to
                      do in the context we are in right now?

                      There's actually three parts to this:
                      I - How do we Review Projects?
                      II - How do we mark which Actions have which Contexts?
                      III - What's the Next Action I should do?

                      Some brainstorming.....

                      I - How do we Review Projects?

                      The Reports feature may be useful for this, though I haven't used it
                      much so I wouldn't know. Maybe a sort of Master Project page would be
                      useful after all, if only to have a list of hyperlinks to the main
                      project description pages, or to the projects' Actions lists. Maybe
                      both of these ideas could utilize some kind of customized bookmarks
                      that can be added to customized toolbars. We just need some way to
                      ease the process of reviewing projects, and I'm not sure what the best
                      way for that would be.

                      II - How do we mark which Actions have which Contexts?

                      I can't help but think that Topics would be a good way to do this...

                      III - For goodness sake, what is the Next Action I should do?!
                      Aaarrgghhh!!!

                      This is where I think templates would help, though I'm not sure how,
                      with people's existing projects scattered about in different
                      categories. I'm sure none of us want to start organizing our projects
                      from scratch! But we can all benefit from finding some easy way to
                      know what the Next Action is. This is where we need the help of an
                      expert template-writer and software-engineer! ;)


                      I don't know if I helped much, but I had to give my perspective on it
                      because GTD is something I've been struggling with myself lately
                      anyways. I would hate to see such a good idea turned into something
                      that doesn't really help with Getting Things Done, because there is a
                      LOT of software out there that does enough of that already. I know,
                      I've looked! :)
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