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Re: [thegreatthirdrail] CA&E In the 1950s

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  • Edward Halstead
    RE: wider loading gauge cars ... trains that could operate downtown over the CTA system, and trains that could only go so far as Des Plaines . In the 50 s the
    Message 1 of 106 , Apr 16, 2012
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      RE: wider loading gauge cars

      "... trains that could operate downtown over the CTA system, and trains that could only go so far as Des Plaines". In the 50"s the percentage of passengers riding only between the west ends of the railway and Des Plaines Ave. compared to the number riding into Chicago was miniscule. All trains had to go downtown whether you liked it or not. Cutting the railway at DesPlaines Ave in 1953 proved that with the rapid drop in ridership when it was done.

      "some CA&E platforms had platform extensions that could be flipped to allow freight to pass." Not a good idea in high traffic areas where there are large numbers of passengers. The lawsuits would out strip the usefulness of the concept. The freight moved along at a far reduced speed so the end of the platform could be flipped up and then down by the crewmembers on the freight train. When the edge wasn't flipped up fast enough, it was torn off by the train with splinters flying through the air. This then left a gap for passengers to jump over to board a car.

      Think about it, when the CA&E was looking for additional cars in the late 30's all they could find were steel cars 10+ years older than their oldest steel cars, the Pullmans. The cars from the WB&A had to have the ends extensively altered to match the load gauge and CRT-Met curves. In the 1930's there was more used (usable) traction equipment for sale than in the 50's.

      The CTA already had a plan on the books to use its own PCC's on the CA&E from Des Plaines to one of the suburbs but not all the way to Wheaton.

      When talking about using what could be called non-standard for the CA&E equipment, the little know plan of using the B&OCT track instead of the CRT/CTA into Chicago would allow for almost any equipment including PCC's for a one seat ride for the commuter with overhead wire, diesel power, you name it.

      Cheers,

      Ed Halstead

       

      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Monday, April 16, 2012 12:52 AM
      Subject: Re: [thegreatthirdrail] CA&E In the 1950s

       

      The idea is somewhat akin to how SEPTA bought some 6000s from the CTA in the 1980s and these were used for several years until new equipment could be purchased for the Norristown line.  But in that case, the cars were, if anything, not quite wide enough, so they had to be adapted to fit existing platforms.

      CA&E would have had the opposite problem.  Some cars they might have been able to purchase may have been too wide.

      Most likely, the largest number of second-hand streetcars in the 1950s were PCCs.  I don't know to what extent they would have had the correct clearances.

      Of course, trains that used trolley poles could have been adapted to use third rail.  In some cases, trains that had low-level boarding could be adapted for high platforms.

      I'm sure someone will bring up riding quality.  But there were definitely PCCs that were used in Interurban service.

      For CA&E, there would have been two considerations... trains that could operate downtown over the CTA system, and trains that could only go so far as Des Plaines.  And I do recall that some CA&E platforms had platform extensions that could be flipped to allow freight to pass.

    • David Sadowski
      Um, in real life Eddie Haskell became an LA cop who was shot several times in the line of duty, and Wally is an artist who had someting on display in the
      Message 106 of 106 , Apr 29, 2012
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        Um, in real life Eddie Haskell became an LA cop who was shot several times in the line of duty, and Wally is an artist who had someting on display in the Louvre in Paris.  Real life is always more interesting than what some people imagine.

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