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Pullman Roll Signs

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  • George
    I recently acquired two Pullman roll signs, one for class, the other for destinations; and added pictures to the photo section. The class sign is well worn and
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 4, 2011
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      I recently acquired two Pullman roll signs, one for class, the other for destinations; and added pictures to the photo section. The class sign is well worn and attached to its steel roller with a gear at one end. The destination roll is in mint condition, though I don't doubt its authenticity. Each roll is 24 inches in width and modelers are free to use the images as they wish.
    • glen brewer
      George, Nice to see those; thanks for posting them. I always wondered: what is the difference between an Express and a Limited? For that matter what is the
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 5, 2011
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        George,

        Nice to see those; thanks for posting them.

        I always wondered: what is the difference between an Express and a Limited? For that matter what is the difference between a Special and an Extra?

        Glen Brewer
        Railroad Glory Days 

        --- In thegreatthirdrail@yahoogroups.com, "George" <gfoelschow@...> wrote:
        >
        > I recently acquired two Pullman roll signs, one for class, the other for destinations; and added pictures to the photo section. The class sign is well worn and attached to its steel roller with a gear at one end. The destination roll is in mint condition, though I don't doubt its authenticity. Each roll is 24 inches in width and modelers are free to use the images as they wish.
        >
      • George
        ... The class designation was most important on the mainline between Chicago and Wheaton. In the period when three trains an hour operated in each direction
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 5, 2011
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          --- In thegreatthirdrail@yahoogroups.com, "glen brewer" <gbrewer@...> wrote:
          >
          > George,
          >
          > Nice to see those; thanks for posting them.
          >
          > I always wondered: what is the difference between an Express and a
          > Limited? For that matter what is the difference between a Special and an
          > Extra?
          >
          > Glen Brewer
          >
          The class designation was most important on the mainline between Chicago and Wheaton. In the period when three trains an hour operated in each direction through most of the day seven days a week, a limited departed Wells Street at :05, operating nonstop from 5th Avenue Maywood to Main Street Lombard, then Glen Ellyn, Wheaton, and terminating at Aurora and Elgin. A Wheaton local followed at :10, making all stops to Wheaton. A Wheaton express departed at :35 with the same pattern as the limited, but adding York Street, Spring Road, Villa Avenue, Ardmore Avenue, and Westmore Avenue. Eastbound from Wheaton, a limited at :54 (skipping Maywood), a local at :00, and an express at :30. The famous Cannonball Limited flew nonstop from Wheaton to Marshfield Avenue in the morning and nonstop from Desplaines Avenue to Wheaton in the afternoon. I took these examples from a 1949 timetable.

          An Extra could be a second section to a scheduled train, or any train not on the schedule. A Special is really a marketing concept. I've seen photos of (scheduled) "Theatre Specials", but a special could also be extra, like the March 1958 train for politicos. (I believe all freight trains were operated as extras.) Extras always carry white marker flags. A Private would be just that, by invitation only. A railfan charter then, appropriately, is extra, special, and private.
        • glen brewer
          George, Thanks for the explanation. So, a Limited is a special Express, but a Special is an Extra perhaps advertised in advance while a Private is an Extra not
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 5, 2011
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            George,

            Thanks for the explanation.

            So, a Limited is a special Express, but a Special is an Extra perhaps advertised in advance while a Private is an Extra not advertised in advance.

            Glen
            Remembering the 'Ror'n' Elgin 


            --- In thegreatthirdrail@yahoogroups.com, "George" <gfoelschow@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In thegreatthirdrail@yahoogroups.com, "glen brewer" gbrewer@ wrote:
            > >
            > > George,
            > >
            > > Nice to see those; thanks for posting them.
            > >
            > > I always wondered: what is the difference between an Express and a
            > > Limited? For that matter what is the difference between a Special and an
            > > Extra?
            > >
            > > Glen Brewer
            > >
            > The class designation was most important on the mainline between Chicago and Wheaton. In the period when three trains an hour operated in each direction through most of the day seven days a week, a limited departed Wells Street at :05, operating nonstop from 5th Avenue Maywood to Main Street Lombard, then Glen Ellyn, Wheaton, and terminating at Aurora and Elgin. A Wheaton local followed at :10, making all stops to Wheaton. A Wheaton express departed at :35 with the same pattern as the limited, but adding York Street, Spring Road, Villa Avenue, Ardmore Avenue, and Westmore Avenue. Eastbound from Wheaton, a limited at :54 (skipping Maywood), a local at :00, and an express at :30. The famous Cannonball Limited flew nonstop from Wheaton to Marshfield Avenue in the morning and nonstop from Desplaines Avenue to Wheaton in the afternoon. I took these examples from a 1949 timetable.
            >
            > An Extra could be a second section to a scheduled train, or any train not on the schedule. A Special is really a marketing concept. I've seen photos of (scheduled) "Theatre Specials", but a special could also be extra, like the March 1958 train for politicos. (I believe all freight trains were operated as extras.) Extras always carry white marker flags. A Private would be just that, by invitation only. A railfan charter then, appropriately, is extra, special, and private.
            >
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