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Re: Fire equipment brought on the CA&E (or AE&C?)

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  • PointSpecial
    Thanks for the responses guys. The 1912 fire seems much more likely (as the AE&C wasn t running in 1899... right?), but I can t find the recording to be able
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 22, 2010
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      Thanks for the responses guys.

      The 1912 fire seems much more likely (as the AE&C wasn't running in 1899... right?), but I can't find the recording to be able to provide any other details.

      Actually... I was just looking through the Chicago Tribune archives myself and I think I found it... but it wasn't the AE&C, it would have been the Chicago and Galena line (or whatever the UP line was called in those days).

      Here's an extract... from 1885, look at the title:

      http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/chicagotribune/access/715804292.html?FMT=ABS&FMTS=ABS:AI&type=historic&date=Apr+23,+1885&author=&pub=Chicago+Daily+Tribune+(1872-1922)&edition=&startpage=3&desc=BIG+BLAZES.

      That seems more plausible on many different levels... the fire equipment would have been much more sparse in the 1880's, as would the population have been, and the steam engine tracks would have been at ground level for any loading to happen (relatively) quickly compared to going on the AE&C or CA&E.

      John

      --- In thegreatthirdrail@yahoogroups.com, "thegreatthirdrail" <thegreatthirdrail@...> wrote:
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      > The story seems unlikely (not necessarily impossible, but unlikely)
      > to me.
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      > Given the timeframe we're talking about here, 1902-1920ish, consider just the time factor alone.
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      > The amount of time from communicating the problem back to Chicago, getting everything together and loaded onto trains, and then the train trip itself,,,hours would have passed. And you have getting fire equipment itself loaded onto freight cars (locate the cars, get ramps, block/chock for transport, etc) Of course in Chicago proper, all your AE&C trackage is elevated, so you have to move the equipment to someplace with streetlevel track,,,
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      > I can potentially see a crew of firefighters being loaded up to make a comparatively high speed run to help with firefighting duties, I can't see any way that actual fire equipment could have been sent in anything remotely resembling a timely manner.
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      > Just my thoughts.
      > John C
      >
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