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NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day (October 6, 2012)

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  • mahtezcatpoc
    http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap121006.html Near the center of this sharp cosmic portrait, at the heart of the Orion Nebula, are four hot, massive stars known as
    Message 1 of 139 , Oct 6, 2012
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      http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap121006.html

      "Near the center of this sharp cosmic portrait, at the heart of the Orion Nebula, are four hot, massive stars known as the Trapezium. Gathered within a region about 1.5 light-years in radius, they dominate the core of the dense Orion Nebula Star Cluster. Ultraviolet ionizing radiation from the Trapezium stars, mostly from the brightest star Theta 1 Orionis C powers the complex star forming region's entire visible glow. About three million years old, the Orion Nebula Cluster was even more compact in its younger years and a recent dynamical study indicates that runaway stellar collisions at an earlier age may have formed a black hole with more than 100 times the mass of the Sun. The presence of a black hole within the cluster could explain the observed high velocities of the Trapezium stars, The Orion Nebula's distance of some 1500 light-years would make it the closest known black hole to planet Earth."


      Mark A. Holmes
    • mahtezcatpoc
      http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap121206.html The bright globular cluster 47 Tucanae (aka NGC 104). Mark A. Holmes
      Message 139 of 139 , Dec 14, 2012
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        http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap121206.html

        The bright globular cluster 47 Tucanae (aka NGC 104).


        Mark A. Holmes
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