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NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day (August 19, 2012)

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  • mahtezcatpoc
    http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap120819.html Globular clusters once ruled the Milky Way. Back in the old days, back when our Galaxy first formed, perhaps thousands
    Message 1 of 139 , Aug 25, 2012
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      http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap120819.html

      "Globular clusters once ruled the Milky Way. Back in the old days, back when our Galaxy first formed, perhaps thousands of globular clusters roamed our Galaxy. Today, there are less than 200 left. Many globular clusters were destroyed over the eons by repeated fateful encounters with each other or the Galactic center. Surviving relics are older than any Earth fossil, older than any other structures in our Galaxy, and limit the universe itself in raw age. There are few, if any, young globular clusters in our Milky Way Galaxy because conditions are not ripe for more to form. Pictured above by the Hubble Space Telescope are about 100,000 of M72's stars. M72, which spans about 50 light years and lies about 50,000 light years away, can be seen with a small telescope toward the constellation of the Water Bearer (Aquarius)."


      Mark A. Holmes
    • mahtezcatpoc
      http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap121206.html The bright globular cluster 47 Tucanae (aka NGC 104). Mark A. Holmes
      Message 139 of 139 , Dec 14, 2012
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        http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap121206.html

        The bright globular cluster 47 Tucanae (aka NGC 104).


        Mark A. Holmes
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