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Re: GRB 110328 A

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  • mahtezcatpoc
    ... As gamma rays are shorter in wavelength than visible light, this object may have a more spiritual, not immediately obvious effect (same for ultraviolet and
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 21, 2011
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      --- In thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com, "mahtezcatpoc" <mahtezcatpoc@...> wrote:
      >
      > It's aligned with my Mars and Vesta.
      >


      As gamma rays are shorter in wavelength than visible light, this object may have a more spiritual, not immediately obvious effect (same for ultraviolet and X-ray objects). Radio and infrared sources might operate more on a mundane level. It's an idea I picked up from (I think) Michael and Margaret Erlewine.


      Mark A. Holmes



      >
      > --- In thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com, "Diana K Rosenberg" <fixed.stars@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Mark sent
      > > <http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap110419.html>
      > > http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap110419.html
      > >
      > > "A symphony of planet-wide observations began abruptly on March 28 when the
      > > Earth-orbiting Swift satellite detected a burst of high-frequency gamma-rays
      > > from GRB 110328A. When the same source flared again after a 45 minute pause
      > > it was clear this event was not a typical gamma-ray burst. Twelve hours
      > > after the initial fanfare astronomers using the 2.5-meter Nordic Optical
      > > Telescope chimed in with a mid-range observation of the optical counterpart.
      > > Early the next day the explosion was picked up in baritone low-frequencies
      > > of radio waves by the ELVA radio dishes in the USA. Later many optical
      > > telescopes, including the 8-meter Gemini North telescope in Hawaii, began
      > > playing along by tracking the optical counterpart. The unusual source was
      > > spotted at a higher register in X-rays by the Chandra X-ray Observatory and
      > > was intermittently followed in the even more soprano-like gamma-ray range
      > > for a week. Joining the chorus, Hubble Space Telescope recorded this image
      > > in optical and infrared light, confirming that the flash was located along
      > > the path of a galaxy at redshift 0.351. If associated with the galaxy, this
      > > explosion occurred when the universe was about two thirds of its present
      > > age. There is much speculation that the unusual gamma-ray burst was a star
      > > being ripped apart by a supermassive black hole in the center of a galaxy
      > > and the puzzling features of the distant detonation are still being
      > > explored."
      > >
      > > =========================================
      > > http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2011/grb110328/
      > >
      > > 2000.0 position: RA 16 44 49.91, Dec +57 35 00.60, in Draco: comes out to
      > >
      > > 6 Scorpio 56 08, Lat 77N31 24
      > >
      > > 2011 position: 7 Scorpio 06
      > >
      > > at Draco's lower jaw
      > >
      > > Love, Diana
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2011/grb110328/
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Website: http://ye-stars.com <http://ye-stars.com/>
      > >
      >
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