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GRB 110328 A

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  • Diana K Rosenberg
    Mark sent http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap110419.html A symphony of planet-wide observations began abruptly on March 28
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 20, 2011
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      Mark sent

      "A symphony of planet-wide observations began abruptly on March 28 when the Earth-orbiting Swift satellite detected a burst of high-frequency gamma-rays from GRB 110328A. When the same source flared again after a 45 minute pause it was clear this event was not a typical gamma-ray burst. Twelve hours after the initial fanfare astronomers using the 2.5-meter Nordic Optical Telescope chimed in with a mid-range observation of the optical counterpart. Early the next day the explosion was picked up in baritone low-frequencies of radio waves by the ELVA radio dishes in the USA. Later many optical telescopes, including the 8-meter Gemini North telescope in Hawaii, began playing along by tracking the optical counterpart. The unusual source was spotted at a higher register in X-rays by the Chandra X-ray Observatory and was intermittently followed in the even more soprano-like gamma-ray range for a week. Joining the chorus, Hubble Space Telescope recorded this image in optical and infrared light, confirming that the flash was located along the path of a galaxy at redshift 0.351. If associated with the galaxy, this explosion occurred when the universe was about two thirds of its present age. There is much speculation that the unusual gamma-ray burst was a star being ripped apart by a supermassive black hole in the center of a galaxy and the puzzling features of the distant detonation are still being explored."

      =========================================
       
      2000.0 position: RA 16 44 49.91, Dec +57 35 00.60, in Draco: comes out to
       
      6 Scorpio 56 08, Lat 77N31 24
       
      2011 position: 7 Scorpio 06
       
      at Draco's lower jaw
       
      Love, Diana
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       

      Website: http://ye-stars.com

       
    • Shevtsova
      ... Hi, Turkey (29 oct 1923 20:30 Ankara Turkey, Asc 7Can), Ahmadinejad (28 oct 1956, Garmsar, Iran) both share Sun conjunct this strange gamma-ray burst from
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 20, 2011
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        > http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap110419.html
        > http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2011/grb110328/
        > 2000.0 position: RA 16 44 49.91, Dec +57 35 00.60, in Draco:
        > comes out to 6 Scorpio 56 08, Lat 77N31 24



        Hi,

        Turkey (29 oct 1923 20:30 Ankara Turkey, Asc 7Can), Ahmadinejad (28 oct
        1956, Garmsar, Iran) both share Sun conjunct this strange gamma-ray burst
        from a star being ripped apart by a supermassive black hole. Transit
        Jupiter will soon oppose 6Scorpio, and transit Saturn will conjunct 6Scorpio
        position in December 2012, so Turkey and Ahmadinejad could be in the news
        both in July 2011, and in December 2012.

        Regards,

        Shev
      • mahtezcatpoc
        It s aligned with my Mars and Vesta. Mark A. Holmes
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 20, 2011
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          It's aligned with my Mars and Vesta.

          Mark A. Holmes

          --- In thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com, "Diana K Rosenberg" <fixed.stars@...> wrote:
          >
          > Mark sent
          > <http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap110419.html>
          > http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap110419.html
          >
          > "A symphony of planet-wide observations began abruptly on March 28 when the
          > Earth-orbiting Swift satellite detected a burst of high-frequency gamma-rays
          > from GRB 110328A. When the same source flared again after a 45 minute pause
          > it was clear this event was not a typical gamma-ray burst. Twelve hours
          > after the initial fanfare astronomers using the 2.5-meter Nordic Optical
          > Telescope chimed in with a mid-range observation of the optical counterpart.
          > Early the next day the explosion was picked up in baritone low-frequencies
          > of radio waves by the ELVA radio dishes in the USA. Later many optical
          > telescopes, including the 8-meter Gemini North telescope in Hawaii, began
          > playing along by tracking the optical counterpart. The unusual source was
          > spotted at a higher register in X-rays by the Chandra X-ray Observatory and
          > was intermittently followed in the even more soprano-like gamma-ray range
          > for a week. Joining the chorus, Hubble Space Telescope recorded this image
          > in optical and infrared light, confirming that the flash was located along
          > the path of a galaxy at redshift 0.351. If associated with the galaxy, this
          > explosion occurred when the universe was about two thirds of its present
          > age. There is much speculation that the unusual gamma-ray burst was a star
          > being ripped apart by a supermassive black hole in the center of a galaxy
          > and the puzzling features of the distant detonation are still being
          > explored."
          >
          > =========================================
          > http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2011/grb110328/
          >
          > 2000.0 position: RA 16 44 49.91, Dec +57 35 00.60, in Draco: comes out to
          >
          > 6 Scorpio 56 08, Lat 77N31 24
          >
          > 2011 position: 7 Scorpio 06
          >
          > at Draco's lower jaw
          >
          > Love, Diana
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2011/grb110328/
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Website: http://ye-stars.com <http://ye-stars.com/>
          >
        • mahtezcatpoc
          ... As gamma rays are shorter in wavelength than visible light, this object may have a more spiritual, not immediately obvious effect (same for ultraviolet and
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 21, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com, "mahtezcatpoc" <mahtezcatpoc@...> wrote:
            >
            > It's aligned with my Mars and Vesta.
            >


            As gamma rays are shorter in wavelength than visible light, this object may have a more spiritual, not immediately obvious effect (same for ultraviolet and X-ray objects). Radio and infrared sources might operate more on a mundane level. It's an idea I picked up from (I think) Michael and Margaret Erlewine.


            Mark A. Holmes



            >
            > --- In thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com, "Diana K Rosenberg" <fixed.stars@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Mark sent
            > > <http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap110419.html>
            > > http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap110419.html
            > >
            > > "A symphony of planet-wide observations began abruptly on March 28 when the
            > > Earth-orbiting Swift satellite detected a burst of high-frequency gamma-rays
            > > from GRB 110328A. When the same source flared again after a 45 minute pause
            > > it was clear this event was not a typical gamma-ray burst. Twelve hours
            > > after the initial fanfare astronomers using the 2.5-meter Nordic Optical
            > > Telescope chimed in with a mid-range observation of the optical counterpart.
            > > Early the next day the explosion was picked up in baritone low-frequencies
            > > of radio waves by the ELVA radio dishes in the USA. Later many optical
            > > telescopes, including the 8-meter Gemini North telescope in Hawaii, began
            > > playing along by tracking the optical counterpart. The unusual source was
            > > spotted at a higher register in X-rays by the Chandra X-ray Observatory and
            > > was intermittently followed in the even more soprano-like gamma-ray range
            > > for a week. Joining the chorus, Hubble Space Telescope recorded this image
            > > in optical and infrared light, confirming that the flash was located along
            > > the path of a galaxy at redshift 0.351. If associated with the galaxy, this
            > > explosion occurred when the universe was about two thirds of its present
            > > age. There is much speculation that the unusual gamma-ray burst was a star
            > > being ripped apart by a supermassive black hole in the center of a galaxy
            > > and the puzzling features of the distant detonation are still being
            > > explored."
            > >
            > > =========================================
            > > http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2011/grb110328/
            > >
            > > 2000.0 position: RA 16 44 49.91, Dec +57 35 00.60, in Draco: comes out to
            > >
            > > 6 Scorpio 56 08, Lat 77N31 24
            > >
            > > 2011 position: 7 Scorpio 06
            > >
            > > at Draco's lower jaw
            > >
            > > Love, Diana
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2011/grb110328/
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Website: http://ye-stars.com <http://ye-stars.com/>
            > >
            >
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