Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Span of Corvus

Expand Messages
  • Diana K. Rosenberg
    CORVUS, THE CROW Approx span of Corvus in tropical degrees (1980) based on IAU boundaries: 3 Lib-21 Lib; span of major stars: 11 Lib-18.5 Lib. (I believe the
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 10, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      CORVUS, THE CROW

      Approx span of Corvus in tropical degrees
      (1980) based on IAU boundaries: 3 Lib-21 Lib; span of
      major stars: 11 Lib-18.5 Lib.

      (I believe the span should be wider, running to at least
      22 Lib)

      From my book (for listers only - material is copyrighted)

      CORVUS, THE CROW

      Two Ravens sit on Odin’s shoulders and bring to his ears all the news
      they see and hear; their names are Thought and Memory. Odin sends them
      out with each dawn to fly over the world, in order he may learn everything
      that happens. Always, he fears that the raven named Thought may not
      return, but every day his deepest concern is for Memory.
      - Snorri Sturluson, “The Deluding of Gylfi” (Icelandic)

      This figure originally represented one of the malignant
      brood of archaic Babylonian sea-monster Tiamat, (Babylonian
      Mummu-Tiamatu "Serpent of Darkness" and "Chaos of the
      Deep"), the embodiment of moral evil and the darkness of
      night, destroyed by the Sun. Her other offspring were Cetus,
      the Sea-Monster, Hydra, the Water-Snake (each sometimes said
      to represent Tiamat herself), Scorpio, the Scorpion, Therion
      (Lupus), the Beast of Death, and Canis Major, the Greater
      Dog. The stars of Corvus formed an archaic Euphratean lunar
      mansion whose patron god was Im-dugud-khu, "The Great
      Storm-Bird" or “Storm Bird of the Evil Wind” of mist and
      tempest; a Storm-Raven closely connected to Hydra, the
      Storm-and-Darkness Serpent. Ancient Akkadians saw these
      stars as Kurra, the Horse, and in China the figure was
      T’ien-Tche, Celestial Chariot, presiding over luggage and
      transport; because of its speed, it also represented the
      wind. Zeta Corvi was Tchang-Cha, the Track of Dust kicked up
      by the fleet chariot.

      To the Greeks this figure was Korax (Raven), sacred to
      Phoebus Apollo and Athene, associated with longevity and
      prophecy. To the Romans he was Corvus (Crow); although the
      raven is larger, these birds are of the same genus,
      mythologically and semiotically interchangable. One story
      linking Apollo and the Crow told of Typhon, "the largest
      monster ever born" who had hundred-league-long arms,
      serpents' heads for hands, coiled serpents for legs. His
      "brutish ass-head touched the stars, his vast wings darkened
      the sun, fire flashed from his eyes, and flaming rocks
      hurtled from his mouth." When he came rushing towards
      Olympus, the gods fled in terror to Egypt, where they
      disguised themselves as animals: Zeus became a ram,
      Dionysus, a goat; Hera, a white cow; Artemis, a cat;
      Aphrodite, a fish; Ares, a boar; and Hermes, an ibis; Apollo
      turned himself into a crow.

      Another story went that Apollo loved Coronis, mother of
      Aesculapius (Ophiuchus, Chapter 9) and sent a crow to
      observe her behavior while he was away; the bird saw that
      she had a yen for Ischys the Thessalian, and immediately
      tattled on the lady. Enraged Apollo shot an arrow into the
      crow, killing it, then rewarded the faithful bird by placing
      it among the stars. (Another version has him furious with
      the crow's chattering and tale-bearing, and punishing it by
      placing it in the stars!) A very moving version of this
      story, in which Apollo kills Coronis and then is overcome
      with grief, is told in Ovid's Metamorphosis; Ovid wrote that
      Apollo in his anger cursed the snow-white crow, turning it
      forever black. There is a world-wide association of the
      Crow/Raven with the Sun and Sun gods: in Japan a red raven
      was associated with Sun, China had a 3-footed raven who
      lived in the Sun; in Greece and Rome the raven was sacred to
      Sun god Phoebus Apollo; in Persia ravens were sacred to the
      god of light and sun.

      According to the Fasti of Ovid, Apollo, preparing to
      sacrifice to Zeus, sent the Crow to fetch water from a
      spring; the bird flew off with a bowl (Crater) in his claws
      and spied a fig tree with ripening fruit; he waited for the
      figs to ripen, leaving Apollo to get his own water. Happily
      stuffed with figs, Corvus needed an alibi; clutching a
      water-snake (Hydra) in his claws, he returned claiming that
      the snake had blocked the spring, but Apollo's gift of
      prophecy saw through the lie and condemned the crow to
      eternal thirst. According to Ovid, Apollo put the Crow, Cup
      and Water-Snake together in the sky.

      The stars of Corvus form the Vedic nakshatra Hasta, the
      Hand.

      Love, Diana
    • Mark Andrew Holmes
      Maybe you have Mars aligned with this constellation without it being aligned with or conjunct any of the stars in it, Morgana? I ve got Venus, Juno, and the
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 10, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Maybe you have Mars aligned with this constellation
        without it being aligned with or conjunct any of the
        stars in it, Morgana?

        I've got Venus, Juno, and the Vertex (and maybe
        Pallas, which is at 3 Libra 50) in this range.

        Mark A. Holmes

        --- "Diana K. Rosenberg" <ye-stars@...>
        wrote:

        >
        > CORVUS, THE CROW
        >
        > Approx span of Corvus in tropical degrees
        > (1980) based on IAU boundaries: 3 Lib-21 Lib; span
        > of
        > major stars: 11 Lib-18.5 Lib.
        >
        > (I believe the span should be wider, running to at
        > least
        > 22 Lib)
        >
        > From my book (for listers only - material is
        > copyrighted)
        >
        > CORVUS, THE CROW
        >
        > Two Ravens sit on Odin’s shoulders and bring to his
        > ears all the news
        > they see and hear; their names are Thought and
        > Memory. Odin sends them
        > out with each dawn to fly over the world, in order
        > he may learn everything
        > that happens. Always, he fears that the raven named
        > Thought may not
        > return, but every day his deepest concern is for
        > Memory.
        > - Snorri Sturluson, “The
        > Deluding of Gylfi” (Icelandic)
        >
        > This figure originally represented one of the
        > malignant
        > brood of archaic Babylonian sea-monster Tiamat,
        > (Babylonian
        > Mummu-Tiamatu "Serpent of Darkness" and "Chaos of
        > the
        > Deep"), the embodiment of moral evil and the
        > darkness of
        > night, destroyed by the Sun. Her other offspring
        > were Cetus,
        > the Sea-Monster, Hydra, the Water-Snake (each
        > sometimes said
        > to represent Tiamat herself), Scorpio, the Scorpion,
        > Therion
        > (Lupus), the Beast of Death, and Canis Major, the
        > Greater
        > Dog. The stars of Corvus formed an archaic
        > Euphratean lunar
        > mansion whose patron god was Im-dugud-khu, "The
        > Great
        > Storm-Bird" or “Storm Bird of the Evil Wind” of mist
        > and
        > tempest; a Storm-Raven closely connected to Hydra,
        > the
        > Storm-and-Darkness Serpent. Ancient Akkadians saw
        > these
        > stars as Kurra, the Horse, and in China the figure
        > was
        > T’ien-Tche, Celestial Chariot, presiding over
        > luggage and
        > transport; because of its speed, it also represented
        > the
        > wind. Zeta Corvi was Tchang-Cha, the Track of Dust
        > kicked up
        > by the fleet chariot.
        >
        > To the Greeks this figure was Korax (Raven), sacred
        > to
        > Phoebus Apollo and Athene, associated with longevity
        > and
        > prophecy. To the Romans he was Corvus (Crow);
        > although the
        > raven is larger, these birds are of the same genus,
        > mythologically and semiotically interchangable. One
        > story
        > linking Apollo and the Crow told of Typhon, "the
        > largest
        > monster ever born" who had hundred-league-long arms,
        > serpents' heads for hands, coiled serpents for legs.
        > His
        > "brutish ass-head touched the stars, his vast wings
        > darkened
        > the sun, fire flashed from his eyes, and flaming
        > rocks
        > hurtled from his mouth." When he came rushing
        > towards
        > Olympus, the gods fled in terror to Egypt, where
        > they
        > disguised themselves as animals: Zeus became a ram,
        > Dionysus, a goat; Hera, a white cow; Artemis, a cat;
        > Aphrodite, a fish; Ares, a boar; and Hermes, an
        > ibis; Apollo
        > turned himself into a crow.
        >
        > Another story went that Apollo loved Coronis, mother
        > of
        > Aesculapius (Ophiuchus, Chapter 9) and sent a crow
        > to
        > observe her behavior while he was away; the bird saw
        > that
        > she had a yen for Ischys the Thessalian, and
        > immediately
        > tattled on the lady. Enraged Apollo shot an arrow
        > into the
        > crow, killing it, then rewarded the faithful bird by
        > placing
        > it among the stars. (Another version has him furious
        > with
        > the crow's chattering and tale-bearing, and
        > punishing it by
        > placing it in the stars!) A very moving version of
        > this
        > story, in which Apollo kills Coronis and then is
        > overcome
        > with grief, is told in Ovid's Metamorphosis; Ovid
        > wrote that
        > Apollo in his anger cursed the snow-white crow,
        > turning it
        > forever black. There is a world-wide association of
        > the
        > Crow/Raven with the Sun and Sun gods: in Japan a red
        > raven
        > was associated with Sun, China had a 3-footed raven
        > who
        > lived in the Sun; in Greece and Rome the raven was
        > sacred to
        > Sun god Phoebus Apollo; in Persia ravens were sacred
        > to the
        > god of light and sun.
        >
        > According to the Fasti of Ovid, Apollo, preparing to
        > sacrifice to Zeus, sent the Crow to fetch water from
        > a
        > spring; the bird flew off with a bowl (Crater) in
        > his claws
        > and spied a fig tree with ripening fruit; he waited
        > for the
        > figs to ripen, leaving Apollo to get his own water.
        > Happily
        > stuffed with figs, Corvus needed an alibi; clutching
        > a
        > water-snake (Hydra) in his claws, he returned
        > claiming that
        > the snake had blocked the spring, but Apollo's gift
        > of
        > prophecy saw through the lie and condemned the crow
        > to
        > eternal thirst. According to Ovid, Apollo put the
        > Crow, Cup
        > and Water-Snake together in the sky.
        >
        > The stars of Corvus form the Vedic nakshatra Hasta,
        > the
        > Hand.
        >
        > Love, Diana


        __________________________________________________
        Do You Yahoo!?
        Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
        http://mail.yahoo.com
      • Morgana
        Hi Mark, I don t know which star. My Mars is 11 Libra, so it is in that Corvus group span 11-18 Libra that Diane mentions. Of course looking at your span
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 10, 2005
        • 0 Attachment

          Hi Mark,   I don’t know which star.  My Mars is 11 Libra, so it is in that Corvus group span 11-18 Libra that Diane mentions.  Of course looking at your span there too Mark, my  Juno is there as well at 3’30 or thereabouts, s.node at 8’35, then Mars,  well actually Poseidon with Mars, Quaoar, then Neptune at 17.  It is fun to see this kind of thing.

          Cheers, Morgana

           

          -----Original Message-----
          From: thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com [mailto:thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mark Andrew Holmes
          Sent: Sunday, July 10, 2005 7:43 AM
          To: thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [thefixedstars] Span of Corvus

           

          Maybe you have Mars aligned with this constellation
          without it being aligned with or conjunct any of the
          stars in it, Morgana?

          I've got Venus, Juno, and the Vertex (and maybe
          Pallas, which is at 3 Libra 50) in this range.

          Mark A. Holmes

          --- "Diana K. Rosenberg" <ye-stars@...>
          wrote:

          >
          > CORVUS, THE CROW
          >
          > Approx span of Corvus in tropical degrees
          > (1980) based on IAU boundaries: 3 Lib-21 Lib; span
          > of
          > major stars: 11 Lib-18.5 Lib.
          >
          > (I believe the span should be wider, running to at
          > least
          > 22 Lib)
          >
          > From my book (for listers only - material is
          > copyrighted)
          >
          > CORVUS, THE CROW
          >
          > Two Ravens sit on Odin’s shoulders and bring to his
          > ears all the news
          > they see and hear; their names are Thought and
          > Memory. Odin sends them
          > out with each dawn to fly over the world, in order
          > he may learn everything
          > that happens. Always, he fears that the raven named
          > Thought may not
          > return, but every day his deepest concern is for
          > Memory.
          >                      - Snorri Sturluson, “The
          > Deluding of Gylfi” (Icelandic)
          >
          > This figure originally represented one of the
          > malignant
          > brood of archaic Babylonian sea-monster Tiamat,
          > (Babylonian
          > Mummu-Tiamatu "Serpent of Darkness" and "Chaos of
          > the
          > Deep"), the embodiment of moral evil and the
          > darkness of
          > night, destroyed by the Sun. Her other offspring
          > were Cetus,
          > the Sea-Monster, Hydra, the Water-Snake (each
          > sometimes said
          > to represent Tiamat herself), Scorpio, the Scorpion,
          > Therion
          > (Lupus), the Beast of Death, and Canis Major, the
          > Greater
          > Dog. The stars of Corvus formed an archaic
          > Euphratean lunar
          > mansion whose patron god was Im-dugud-khu, "The
          > Great
          > Storm-Bird" or “Storm Bird of the Evil Wind” of mist
          > and
          > tempest; a Storm-Raven closely connected to Hydra,
          > the
          > Storm-and-Darkness Serpent. Ancient Akkadians saw
          > these
          > stars as Kurra, the Horse, and in China the figure
          > was
          > T’ien-Tche, Celestial Chariot, presiding over
          > luggage and
          > transport; because of its speed, it also represented
          > the
          > wind. Zeta Corvi was Tchang-Cha, the Track of Dust
          > kicked up
          > by the fleet chariot.
          >
          > To the Greeks this figure was Korax (Raven), sacred
          > to
          > Phoebus Apollo and Athene, associated with longevity
          > and
          > prophecy. To the Romans he was Corvus (Crow);
          > although the
          > raven is larger, these birds are of the same genus,
          > mythologically and semiotically interchangable. One
          > story
          > linking Apollo and the Crow told of Typhon, "the
          > largest
          > monster ever born" who had hundred-league-long arms,
          > serpents' heads for hands, coiled serpents for legs.
          > His
          > "brutish ass-head touched the stars, his vast wings
          > darkened
          > the sun, fire flashed from his eyes, and flaming
          > rocks
          > hurtled from his mouth." When he came rushing
          > towards
          > Olympus, the gods fled in terror to Egypt, where
          > they
          > disguised themselves as animals: Zeus became a ram,
          > Dionysus, a goat; Hera, a white cow; Artemis, a cat;
          > Aphrodite, a fish; Ares, a boar; and Hermes, an
          > ibis; Apollo
          > turned himself into a crow.
          >
          > Another story went that Apollo loved Coronis, mother
          > of
          > Aesculapius (Ophiuchus, Chapter 9) and sent a crow
          > to
          > observe her behavior while he was away; the bird saw
          > that
          > she had a yen for Ischys the Thessalian, and
          > immediately
          > tattled on the lady. Enraged Apollo shot an arrow
          > into the
          > crow, killing it, then rewarded the faithful bird by
          > placing
          > it among the stars. (Another version has him furious
          > with
          > the crow's chattering and tale-bearing, and
          > punishing it by
          > placing it in the stars!) A very moving version of
          > this
          > story, in which Apollo kills Coronis and then is
          > overcome
          > with grief, is told in Ovid's Metamorphosis; Ovid
          > wrote that
          > Apollo in his anger cursed the snow-white crow,
          > turning it
          > forever black. There is a world-wide association of
          > the
          > Crow/Raven with the Sun and Sun gods: in Japan a red
          > raven
          > was associated with Sun, China had a 3-footed raven
          > who
          > lived in the Sun; in Greece and Rome the raven was
          > sacred to
          > Sun god Phoebus Apollo; in Persia ravens were sacred
          > to the
          > god of light and sun.
          >
          > According to the Fasti of Ovid, Apollo, preparing to
          > sacrifice to Zeus, sent the Crow to fetch water from
          > a
          > spring; the bird flew off with a bowl (Crater) in
          > his claws
          > and spied a fig tree with ripening fruit; he waited
          > for the
          > figs to ripen, leaving Apollo to get his own water.
          > Happily
          > stuffed with figs, Corvus needed an alibi; clutching
          > a
          > water-snake (Hydra) in his claws, he returned
          > claiming that
          > the snake had blocked the spring, but Apollo's gift
          > of
          > prophecy saw through the lie and condemned the crow
          > to
          > eternal thirst. According to Ovid, Apollo put the
          > Crow, Cup
          > and Water-Snake together in the sky.
          >
          > The stars of Corvus form the Vedic nakshatra Hasta,
          > the
          > Hand.
          >
          > Love, Diana


          __________________________________________________
          Do You Yahoo!?
          Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
          http://mail.yahoo.com

        • Morgana
          Diana thank you for posting this Corvus excerpt from your book. Raven is sacred to the West Coast aboriginals here in Canada as well. What is the name of your
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 10, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            Diana thank you for posting this Corvus excerpt from your book.
            Raven is sacred to the West Coast aboriginals here in Canada as well.
            What is the name of your book? I am going to buy it. It's wonderful.
            Cheers,
            Morgana


            -----Original Message-----
            From: thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto:thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Diana K. Rosenberg
            Sent: Sunday, July 10, 2005 7:34 AM
            To: Fixed Stars Group
            Subject: [thefixedstars] Span of Corvus



            CORVUS, THE CROW

            Approx span of Corvus in tropical degrees
            (1980) based on IAU boundaries: 3 Lib-21 Lib; span of
            major stars: 11 Lib-18.5 Lib.

            (I believe the span should be wider, running to at least
            22 Lib)

            From my book (for listers only - material is copyrighted)

            CORVUS, THE CROW

            Two Ravens sit on Odin?s shoulders and bring to his ears all the news
            they see and hear; their names are Thought and Memory. Odin sends them
            out with each dawn to fly over the world, in order he may learn
            everything
            that happens. Always, he fears that the raven named Thought may not
            return, but every day his deepest concern is for Memory.
            - Snorri Sturluson, ?The Deluding of Gylfi?
            (Icelandic)

            This figure originally represented one of the malignant
            brood of archaic Babylonian sea-monster Tiamat, (Babylonian
            Mummu-Tiamatu "Serpent of Darkness" and "Chaos of the
            Deep"), the embodiment of moral evil and the darkness of
            night, destroyed by the Sun. Her other offspring were Cetus,
            the Sea-Monster, Hydra, the Water-Snake (each sometimes said
            to represent Tiamat herself), Scorpio, the Scorpion, Therion
            (Lupus), the Beast of Death, and Canis Major, the Greater
            Dog. The stars of Corvus formed an archaic Euphratean lunar
            mansion whose patron god was Im-dugud-khu, "The Great
            Storm-Bird" or ?Storm Bird of the Evil Wind? of mist and
            tempest; a Storm-Raven closely connected to Hydra, the
            Storm-and-Darkness Serpent. Ancient Akkadians saw these
            stars as Kurra, the Horse, and in China the figure was
            T?ien-Tche, Celestial Chariot, presiding over luggage and
            transport; because of its speed, it also represented the
            wind. Zeta Corvi was Tchang-Cha, the Track of Dust kicked up
            by the fleet chariot.

            To the Greeks this figure was Korax (Raven), sacred to
            Phoebus Apollo and Athene, associated with longevity and
            prophecy. To the Romans he was Corvus (Crow); although the
            raven is larger, these birds are of the same genus,
            mythologically and semiotically interchangable. One story
            linking Apollo and the Crow told of Typhon, "the largest
            monster ever born" who had hundred-league-long arms,
            serpents' heads for hands, coiled serpents for legs. His
            "brutish ass-head touched the stars, his vast wings darkened
            the sun, fire flashed from his eyes, and flaming rocks
            hurtled from his mouth." When he came rushing towards
            Olympus, the gods fled in terror to Egypt, where they
            disguised themselves as animals: Zeus became a ram,
            Dionysus, a goat; Hera, a white cow; Artemis, a cat;
            Aphrodite, a fish; Ares, a boar; and Hermes, an ibis; Apollo
            turned himself into a crow.

            Another story went that Apollo loved Coronis, mother of
            Aesculapius (Ophiuchus, Chapter 9) and sent a crow to
            observe her behavior while he was away; the bird saw that
            she had a yen for Ischys the Thessalian, and immediately
            tattled on the lady. Enraged Apollo shot an arrow into the
            crow, killing it, then rewarded the faithful bird by placing
            it among the stars. (Another version has him furious with
            the crow's chattering and tale-bearing, and punishing it by
            placing it in the stars!) A very moving version of this
            story, in which Apollo kills Coronis and then is overcome
            with grief, is told in Ovid's Metamorphosis; Ovid wrote that
            Apollo in his anger cursed the snow-white crow, turning it
            forever black. There is a world-wide association of the
            Crow/Raven with the Sun and Sun gods: in Japan a red raven
            was associated with Sun, China had a 3-footed raven who
            lived in the Sun; in Greece and Rome the raven was sacred to
            Sun god Phoebus Apollo; in Persia ravens were sacred to the
            god of light and sun.

            According to the Fasti of Ovid, Apollo, preparing to
            sacrifice to Zeus, sent the Crow to fetch water from a
            spring; the bird flew off with a bowl (Crater) in his claws
            and spied a fig tree with ripening fruit; he waited for the
            figs to ripen, leaving Apollo to get his own water. Happily
            stuffed with figs, Corvus needed an alibi; clutching a
            water-snake (Hydra) in his claws, he returned claiming that
            the snake had blocked the spring, but Apollo's gift of
            prophecy saw through the lie and condemned the crow to
            eternal thirst. According to Ovid, Apollo put the Crow, Cup
            and Water-Snake together in the sky.

            The stars of Corvus form the Vedic nakshatra Hasta, the
            Hand.

            Love, Diana







            Yahoo! Groups Links
          • Martina
            Yes Diana,.. please post your books again and where to get em. I got busy and lost the information,... and woohoo!! As of Friday I am OFF WORK so maybe I
            Message 5 of 5 , Jul 11, 2005
            • 0 Attachment
              Yes Diana,.. please post your books again
              and where to get 'em. I got busy and lost
              the information,... and woohoo!! As of Friday I am
              OFF WORK so maybe I can actually spend some time
              catching up with astro!!!
              Oh,.. and do you take Paypal?? (or credit cards?) Makes
              it easier for us Canadians,.. :-)
              Martina
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.