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Re: Chinese stars

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  • mahtezcatpoc
    Thanks. Mark A. Holmes
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 4, 2009
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      Thanks.

      Mark A. Holmes

      --- In thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com, "Diana K Rosenberg" <fixed.stars@...> wrote:
      >
      > DKR sent
      > > Note that this starset has the highest score of fires. Ancient Chinese
      >
      > > called Psi Cancri "The Fire Officer" and Mu Cancri "Piled-up Kindling"
      >
      > Xiaofang Zhongzhan and Duiqi Dianran, respectively? (I got that from an
      > online translator).
      >
      > ============================================================================
      > ==================
      > This is what I have in the China file - it's from Staal's Stars of Jade
      > (which, I've been told, is now impossible to get)
      >
      >
      > Mu Cancri (29CA12) was Tsi-Sin, the Piled-Up Kindling on which the festival
      > food would be cooked. This star's clarity was essential for the success of
      > the summer celebration. If this star appeared to be close to Tsi-Choui, the
      > Accumulated Waters, the year would be a happy and prosperous one; if it
      > appeared to be far away from Tsi-Choui, it was an ill omen that the harvest
      > would be bad.
      >
      >
      >
      > Note: Staal had "Piled-up Faggots" and I didn't want to go there! So I took
      > the liberty of using "kindling" instead.
      >
      >
      >
      > Just above and to the west of the Crab's shell, where we have its hind legs,
      > is Kouan, The Warning Lantern, which is Phi2, Chi, Psi & Lambda Cancri,
      > (2LE14, 0LE42, 28CA58, 1LE49), also called the Light House or Bea-con.
      > Chinese astrologers disagreed about these stars; some said the figure
      > presided over the rekindling of the fires in the sacrificial kitchens at the
      > four seasonal ceremonies; some said it stood for lanterns lit as disaster or
      > distress signals; still others called it The Fire Officer. At any rate, the
      > fire theme is clear. Schlegel, the great 19th-century expert on Chinese
      > constellations, thought the lanterns or torches were to remind hunters to
      > offer sacrifices to ancestor spirits. (This is a very very high-scoring
      > fire area)
      >
      >
      > The Chinese terms you sent are the new Pin Yin chinese translations - Staal
      > used the old Wade-Giles versions; but anyway as you can see the words must
      > be different. And he never gave a Chinese name for The Fire Officer.
      >
      > Staal, who was originally Dutch, took his info from Gustaaf Schlegel (19th
      > century sinologist) who was also Dutch.
      >
      > Love, Diana
      >
      > Website: http://ye-stars.com <http://ye-stars.com/>
      >
    • mahtezcatpoc
      ... What is Tsi-Choui? Mark A. Holmes
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 6, 2009
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        > --- In thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com, "Diana K Rosenberg" <fixed.stars@> wrote:
        > >
        > > DKR sent
        > > > Note that this starset has the highest score of fires. Ancient Chinese
        > >
        > > > called Psi Cancri "The Fire Officer" and Mu Cancri "Piled-up Kindling"


        ============================================================================
        > > ==================
        > > This is what I have in the China file - it's from Staal's Stars of Jade
        > > (which, I've been told, is now impossible to get)
        > >
        > >
        > > Mu Cancri (29CA12) was Tsi-Sin, the Piled-Up Kindling on which the festival
        > > food would be cooked. This star's clarity was essential for the success of
        > > the summer celebration. If this star appeared to be close to Tsi-Choui, the
        > > Accumulated Waters, the year would be a happy and prosperous one; if it
        > > appeared to be far away from Tsi-Choui, it was an ill omen that the harvest
        > > would be bad.


        What is Tsi-Choui?


        Mark A. Holmes
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