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Chinese stars

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  • Diana K Rosenberg
    DKR sent ... Xiaofang Zhongzhan and Duiqi Dianran, respectively? (I got that from an online translator).
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 4, 2009
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      DKR sent

      > Note that this starset has the highest score of fires. Ancient

      Chinese

      > called Psi Cancri "The Fire

      Officer" and Mu Cancri "Piled-up Kindling"

      Xiaofang Zhongzhan and Duiqi Dianran, respectively? (I got that from an online translator).

      ==============================================================================================
      This is what I have in the China file - it's from Staal's Stars of Jade (which, I've been told, is now impossible to get)
       

      Mu Cancri (29CA12) was Tsi-Sin, the Piled-Up Kindling on which the festival food would be cooked.  This star's clarity was essential for the success of the summer celebration. If this star appeared to be close to Tsi-Choui, the Accumulated Waters, the year would be a happy and prosperous one; if it appeared to be far away from Tsi-Choui, it was an ill omen that the harvest would be bad.

       

      Note: Staal had "Piled-up Faggots" and I didn't want to go there!  So I took the liberty of using "kindling" instead.

       

      Just above and to the west of the Crab's shell, where we have its hind legs, is Kouan, The Warning Lantern, which is Phi2, Chi, Psi & Lambda Cancri, (2LE14, 0LE42, 28CA58, 1LE49), also called the Light House or Bea­con. Chinese astrologers disagreed about these stars; some said the figure presided over the rekindling of the fires in the sacrificial kitchens at the four seasonal ceremonies; some said it stood for lanterns lit as disaster or distress signals; still others called it The Fire Officer. At any rate, the fire theme is clear. Schlegel, the great 19th-century expert on Chinese constellations, thought the lanterns or torches were to remind hunters to offer sacrifices to ancestor spirits.  (This is a very very high-scoring fire area)

       
      The Chinese terms you sent are the new Pin Yin chinese translations - Staal used the old Wade-Giles versions; but anyway as you can see the words must be different.  And he never gave a Chinese name for The Fire Officer.

      Staal, who was originally Dutch, took his info from Gustaaf Schlegel (19th century sinologist) who was also Dutch.

      Love, Diana

      Website: http://ye-stars.com

       
    • mahtezcatpoc
      Thanks. Mark A. Holmes
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 4, 2009
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        Thanks.

        Mark A. Holmes

        --- In thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com, "Diana K Rosenberg" <fixed.stars@...> wrote:
        >
        > DKR sent
        > > Note that this starset has the highest score of fires. Ancient Chinese
        >
        > > called Psi Cancri "The Fire Officer" and Mu Cancri "Piled-up Kindling"
        >
        > Xiaofang Zhongzhan and Duiqi Dianran, respectively? (I got that from an
        > online translator).
        >
        > ============================================================================
        > ==================
        > This is what I have in the China file - it's from Staal's Stars of Jade
        > (which, I've been told, is now impossible to get)
        >
        >
        > Mu Cancri (29CA12) was Tsi-Sin, the Piled-Up Kindling on which the festival
        > food would be cooked. This star's clarity was essential for the success of
        > the summer celebration. If this star appeared to be close to Tsi-Choui, the
        > Accumulated Waters, the year would be a happy and prosperous one; if it
        > appeared to be far away from Tsi-Choui, it was an ill omen that the harvest
        > would be bad.
        >
        >
        >
        > Note: Staal had "Piled-up Faggots" and I didn't want to go there! So I took
        > the liberty of using "kindling" instead.
        >
        >
        >
        > Just above and to the west of the Crab's shell, where we have its hind legs,
        > is Kouan, The Warning Lantern, which is Phi2, Chi, Psi & Lambda Cancri,
        > (2LE14, 0LE42, 28CA58, 1LE49), also called the Light House or Bea-con.
        > Chinese astrologers disagreed about these stars; some said the figure
        > presided over the rekindling of the fires in the sacrificial kitchens at the
        > four seasonal ceremonies; some said it stood for lanterns lit as disaster or
        > distress signals; still others called it The Fire Officer. At any rate, the
        > fire theme is clear. Schlegel, the great 19th-century expert on Chinese
        > constellations, thought the lanterns or torches were to remind hunters to
        > offer sacrifices to ancestor spirits. (This is a very very high-scoring
        > fire area)
        >
        >
        > The Chinese terms you sent are the new Pin Yin chinese translations - Staal
        > used the old Wade-Giles versions; but anyway as you can see the words must
        > be different. And he never gave a Chinese name for The Fire Officer.
        >
        > Staal, who was originally Dutch, took his info from Gustaaf Schlegel (19th
        > century sinologist) who was also Dutch.
        >
        > Love, Diana
        >
        > Website: http://ye-stars.com <http://ye-stars.com/>
        >
      • mahtezcatpoc
        ... What is Tsi-Choui? Mark A. Holmes
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 6, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          > --- In thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com, "Diana K Rosenberg" <fixed.stars@> wrote:
          > >
          > > DKR sent
          > > > Note that this starset has the highest score of fires. Ancient Chinese
          > >
          > > > called Psi Cancri "The Fire Officer" and Mu Cancri "Piled-up Kindling"


          ============================================================================
          > > ==================
          > > This is what I have in the China file - it's from Staal's Stars of Jade
          > > (which, I've been told, is now impossible to get)
          > >
          > >
          > > Mu Cancri (29CA12) was Tsi-Sin, the Piled-Up Kindling on which the festival
          > > food would be cooked. This star's clarity was essential for the success of
          > > the summer celebration. If this star appeared to be close to Tsi-Choui, the
          > > Accumulated Waters, the year would be a happy and prosperous one; if it
          > > appeared to be far away from Tsi-Choui, it was an ill omen that the harvest
          > > would be bad.


          What is Tsi-Choui?


          Mark A. Holmes
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