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Re: [thefixedstars] FW: Two New Star Systems Are First Of Their Kind Ever Found

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  • Mark Andrew Holmes
    ... http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Two_New_Star_Systems_Are_First_Of_Their_Ki ... Thank you, Diana. BLGD... Mark A. Holmes Begin story.-- STELLAR CHEMISTRY
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 2, 2008
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      --- Diana K Rosenberg <fixed.stars@...> wrote:

      > Astrologer Jackie Slevin sent me this - now if we
      > can just
      > get positions!
      >
      > Love, Diana
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Jackie Slevin [mailto:jcslevin@...]
      > Sent: Wednesday, April 02, 2008 11:34 AM
      > To: Diana Rosenberg
      > Subject: Two New Star Systems Are First Of Their
      > Kind Ever Found
      >
      > Enjoy!
      >
      >
      http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Two_New_Star_Systems_Are_First_Of_Their_Ki
      > nd_Ever_Found_999.html




      Thank you, Diana.


      BLGD...


      Mark A. Holmes




      Begin story.--


      STELLAR CHEMISTRY
      Two New Star Systems Are First Of Their Kind Ever
      Found


      by Staff Writers
      Columbus OH (SPX) Apr 02, 2008

      Astronomers have spied a faraway star system that is
      so unusual, it was one of a kind -- until its
      discovery helped them pinpoint a second one that was
      much closer to home. In a paper published in a recent
      issue of the Astrophysical Journal Letters, Ohio State
      University astronomers and their colleagues suggest
      that these star systems are the progenitors of a rare
      type of supernova.
      They discovered the first star system 13 million light
      years away, tucked inside Holmberg IX, a small galaxy
      that is orbiting the larger galaxy M81. They studied
      it between January and October 2007 with the Large
      Binocular Telescope (LBT) on Mt. Graham in Arizona.

      The star system is unusual, because it's what the
      astronomers have called a "yellow supergiant eclipsing
      binary" -- it contains two very bright, massive yellow
      stars that are very closely orbiting each other. In
      fact, the stars are so close together that a large
      amount of stellar material is shared between them, so
      that the shape of the system resembles a peanut.

      In a repeating cycle, one star moves to the front and
      blocks our view of the other. From Earth, the star
      system brightens and dims, as we see light from two
      stars, then only one star.

      The two stars in this system appear to be nearly
      identical, each 15 to 20 times the mass of our sun.

      Jose Prieto, Ohio State University graduate student
      and lead author on the journal paper, analyzed the new
      star system as part of his doctoral dissertation. In
      his research, he scoured the historical record to
      determine whether his group had indeed found the first
      such binary.

      To his surprise, he uncovered another one a little
      less than 230,000 light years away in the Small
      Magellanic Cloud, a small galaxy that orbits our own
      Milky Way.

      The star system had been discovered in the 1980s, but
      was misidentified. When Prieto re-examined the data
      that astronomers had recorded at the time, he saw that
      the pattern of light was very similar to the one they
      had detected outside of M81. The stars were even the
      same size -- 15 to 20 times the mass of the sun -- and
      melded together in the same kind of peanut shape. The
      system was clearly a yellow supergiant eclipsing
      binary.

      "We didn't expect to find one of these things, much
      less two," said Kris Stanek, associate professor of
      astronomy at Ohio State. "You never expect this sort
      of thing. But I think this shows how flexible you have
      to be in astrophysics. We needed the 8.4-meter LBT to
      spot the first binary, but the second one is so bright
      that you could see it with binoculars in your back
      yard. Yet, if we hadn't found the first one, we may
      never have found the second one."

      "It shows that there are still valuable discoveries
      hidden in plain sight. You just have to keep your eyes
      open and connect the dots."

      The find may help solve another mystery. Of all the
      supernovae that have been studied over the years, two
      have been linked to yellow supergiants -- and that's
      two more than astronomers would expect.

      Prieto explained why. Over millions of years, a star
      will burn hotter or cooler as it consumes different
      chemical elements in its core. The most massive stars
      swing back and forth between being cool red
      supergiants or hot blue ones. They spend most of their
      lives at one end of the temperature scale or the
      other, but spend only a short time in-between, where
      they are classified as yellow. Most stars end their
      life in a supernova at the red end of the cycle; a few
      do at the blue end. But none do it during the short
      yellow transitional phase in between.

      At least, that's what astronomers thought.

      Prieto, Stanek, and their colleagues suspect that
      yellow binary systems like the ones they found could
      be the progenitors of these odd supernovae.

      "When two stars orbit each other very closely, they
      share material, and the evolution of one affects the
      other," Prieto said. "It's possible two supergiants in
      such a system would evolve more slowly, and spend more
      time in the yellow phase -- long enough that one of
      them could explode as a yellow supergiant."

      The discovery of this yellow supergiant binary system
      is just the first result of a long-term LBT project to
      monitor stellar variability in the nearby universe.
      That project is led by Ohio State professor of
      astronomy, Chris Kochanek. He and Rick Pogge, also a
      professor of astronomy, are coauthors on the paper in
      Astrophysical Journal Letters.

      Their collaborators were from the University of
      Minnesota, the Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova,
      Steward Observatory, the Max-Planck-Institut fur
      extraterrestrische Physik, the Osservatorio
      Astronomico di Roma, the University of Notre Dame, and
      the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory. They used
      observations from the 8.4-meter LBT and from the
      2.4-meter telescope at the nearby MDM observatory.

      The LBT is an international collaboration among
      institutions in the United States, Italy and Germany.
      The LBT Corporation partners are: the University of
      Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system;
      Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; LBT
      Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the
      Max Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute
      Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; Ohio State
      University; The Research Corporation, on behalf of The
      University of Notre Dame, University of Minnesota, and
      University of Virginia.


      --Story ends.



      ____________________________________________________________________________________
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    • Mark Andrew Holmes
      One of them is in Nubecula Minor (I don t know where). The other is in the galaxy Holmberg IX (Uppsala 5336, or UGC 5336), which orbits M-81 (Bode s Galaxy)
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 2, 2008
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        One of them is in Nubecula Minor (I don't know where).
        The other is in the galaxy Holmberg IX (Uppsala 5336,
        or UGC 5336), which orbits M-81 (Bode's Galaxy) in
        Ursa Major:

        http://seds.org/Messier/more/m081_hom9.html

        http://simbad3.u-strasbg.fr/sim-id.pl?Ident=Holmberg+IX

        FK5 2000/2000 coordinates

        (RA) 09 57 32.1
        (declination) +69 02 46


        I'll convert this into zodiacal coordinates in a
        little while.


        Mark A. Holmes





        --- Diana K Rosenberg <fixed.stars@...> wrote:

        > Astrologer Jackie Slevin sent me this - now if we
        > can just
        > get positions!
        >
        > Love, Diana
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Jackie Slevin [mailto:jcslevin@...]
        > Sent: Wednesday, April 02, 2008 11:34 AM
        > To: Diana Rosenberg
        > Subject: Two New Star Systems Are First Of Their
        > Kind Ever Found
        >
        > Enjoy!
        >
        >
        http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Two_New_Star_Systems_Are_First_Of_Their_Ki
        > nd_Ever_Found_999.html
        >
        >
        >
        >



        ____________________________________________________________________________________
        You rock. That's why Blockbuster's offering you one month of Blockbuster Total Access, No Cost.
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      • Mark Andrew Holmes
        ... http://simbad3.u-strasbg.fr/sim-id.pl?Ident=Holmberg+IX ... 29 Cancer 52. Mark A. Holmes ...
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 2, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          --- Mark Andrew Holmes <mahtezcatpoc@...> wrote:

          > One of them is in Nubecula Minor (I don't know
          > where).
          > The other is in the galaxy Holmberg IX (Uppsala
          > 5336,
          > or UGC 5336), which orbits M-81 (Bode's Galaxy) in
          > Ursa Major:
          >
          > http://seds.org/Messier/more/m081_hom9.html
          >
          >
          http://simbad3.u-strasbg.fr/sim-id.pl?Ident=Holmberg+IX
          >
          > FK5 2000/2000 coordinates
          >
          > (RA) 09 57 32.1
          > (declination) +69 02 46
          >
          >
          > I'll convert this into zodiacal coordinates in a
          > little while.



          29 Cancer 52.


          Mark A. Holmes


          >
          >
          >
          >
          > --- Diana K Rosenberg <fixed.stars@...>
          > wrote:
          >
          > > Astrologer Jackie Slevin sent me this - now if we
          > > can just
          > > get positions!
          > >
          > > Love, Diana
          > >
          > > -----Original Message-----
          > > From: Jackie Slevin [mailto:jcslevin@...]
          > > Sent: Wednesday, April 02, 2008 11:34 AM
          > > To: Diana Rosenberg
          > > Subject: Two New Star Systems Are First Of Their
          > > Kind Ever Found
          > >
          > > Enjoy!
          > >
          > >
          >
          http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Two_New_Star_Systems_Are_First_Of_Their_Ki
          > > nd_Ever_Found_999.html



          ____________________________________________________________________________________
          You rock. That's why Blockbuster's offering you one month of Blockbuster Total Access, No Cost.
          http://tc.deals.yahoo.com/tc/blockbuster/text5.com
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