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Gula

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  • Diana K Rosenberg
    Rab sent RW: Ahh yes, Gula. I forget where I might have seen this linked with a goddess. Presumably from Babylonian -gu-, a water jug; but Gula is usually the
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 13, 2007
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      Gula

      Rab sent

      RW: Ahh yes, Gula. I forget where I might have seen this linked
      with a goddess. Presumably from Babylonian -gu-, a water jug;
      but Gula is usually the (male) Giant or Big One. What do YOU have?
      ===========================================
      This is the Gula section, under the info on the constellation of Aquarius:

      GULA, THE GREAT DOCTORESS

              I am a physician, I know how to heal, I carry with me all the herbs...

          I am provided with a bag full of effective conjurations, I carry texts
          for healing, I effect cures for all...

                                                      - The Gula Hymn of Bullutsa-rabi

                                                 

      On very ancient Mesopotamian kudurru - boundary stones carved with constellation figures - the area we know as Aquarius, the Water-Pourer shows instead a seated goddess with her crouching dog: this was Earth-goddess Gula, “The Great Doctoress,” daughter of Anu, God of Heaven, and consort of Ninib (Saturn). Gula was “Great One” or “Great Female Physician,” “life-giver” who could preserve the health of the body and remove sickness and disease “by the touch of her hand.” Her power could be used for evil as well as good, and appeals to her could bring on the very diseases she was able to heal, or strike an enemy with blindness. Sometimes referred to as “lady of the netherworld” who restored the dead to life, Gula actually occupied a unique intermediate position between gods of the living and gods of the dead (some scholars feel she was originally a death goddess). Her dog, crouched beside her, was a guardian and psychopomp (spirit guide) mediating between lands of the dead and of the living. According to Grun’s Timetables of History, between 3,000 and 2,500 BCE, “Sumerian medicine discovered the healing qualities of mineral springs.” This would connect the concept of healing (Gula) and water (Urn), at just the time in history when the stars of the Urn marked the Winter Solstice. (As I worked to fit the kudurru representations of Gula into Aquarius’ pattern of stars, with the limitations of Capricornus’ tail to the west, the West Fish of Pisces to the north and Piscis Austrinus to the South, she came out with her upraised hands at the mouth of the Water-Pourer’s Urn, as if summoning, blessing or bathing in its ever-flowing waters). Text fragments speak of her “basket” – perhaps that is what she is sitting on.

      GULA, THE GREAT DOCTORESS

              I am a physician, I know how to heal, I carry with me all the herbs...

          I am provided with a bag full of effective conjurations, I carry texts
          for healing, I effect cures for all...

                                                      - The Gula Hymn of Bullutsa-rabi

                                                 

      On very ancient Mesopotamian kudurru - boundary stones carved with constellation figures - the area we know as Aquarius, the Water-Pourer shows instead a seated goddess with her crouching dog: this was Earth-goddess Gula, “The Great Doctoress,” daughter of Anu, God of Heaven, and consort of Ninib (Saturn). Gula was “Great One” or “Great Female Physician,” “life-giver” who could preserve the health of the body and remove sickness and disease “by the touch of her hand.” Her power could be used for evil as well as good, and appeals to her could bring on the very diseases she was able to heal, or strike an enemy with blindness. Sometimes referred to as “lady of the netherworld” who restored the dead to life, Gula actually occupied a unique intermediate position between gods of the living and gods of the dead (some scholars feel she was originally a death goddess). Her dog, crouched beside her, was a guardian and psychopomp (spirit guide) mediating between lands of the dead and of the living. According to Grun’s Timetables of History, between 3,000 and 2,500 BCE, “Sumerian medicine discovered the healing qualities of mineral springs.” This would connect the concept of healing (Gula) and water (Urn), at just the time in history when the stars of the Urn marked the Winter Solstice. (As I worked to fit the kudurru representations of Gula into Aquarius’ pattern of stars, with the limitations of Capricornus’ tail to the west, the West Fish of Pisces to the north and Piscis Austrinus to the South, she came out with her upraised hands at the mouth of the Water-Pourer’s Urn, as if summoning, blessing or bathing in its ever-flowing waters). Text fragments speak of her “basket” – perhaps that is what she is sitting on.

      GULA, THE GREAT DOCTORESS

              I am a physician, I know how to heal, I carry with me all the herbs...

          I am provided with a bag full of effective conjurations, I carry texts
          for healing, I effect cures for all...

                                                      - The Gula Hymn of Bullutsa-rabi

                                                 

      On very ancient Mesopotamian kudurru - boundary stones carved with constellation figures - the area we know as Aquarius, the Water-Pourer shows instead a seated goddess with her crouching dog: this was Earth-goddess Gula, “The Great Doctoress,” daughter of Anu, God of Heaven, and consort of Ninib (Saturn). Gula was “Great One” or “Great Female Physician,” “life-giver” who could preserve the health of the body and remove sickness and disease “by the touch of her hand.” Her power could be used for evil as well as good, and appeals to her could bring on the very diseases she was able to heal, or strike an enemy with blindness. Sometimes referred to as “lady of the netherworld” who restored the dead to life, Gula actually occupied a unique intermediate position between gods of the living and gods of the dead (some scholars feel she was originally a death goddess). Her dog, crouched beside her, was a guardian and psychopomp (spirit guide) mediating between lands of the dead and of the living. According to Grun’s Timetables of History, between 3,000 and 2,500 BCE, “Sumerian medicine discovered the healing qualities of mineral springs.” This would connect the concept of healing (Gula) and water (Urn), at just the time in history when the stars of the Urn marked the Winter Solstice. (As I worked to fit the kudurru representations of Gula into Aquarius’ pattern of stars, with the limitations of Capricornus’ tail to the west, the West Fish of Pisces to the north and Piscis Austrinus to the South, she came out with her upraised hands at the mouth of the Water-Pourer’s Urn, as if summoning, blessing or bathing in its ever-flowing waters). Text fragments speak of her “basket” – perhaps that is what she is sitting on.

      Love, Diana

      Looking for pictures, just found this site:
      www.matrifocus.com/IMB06/images/Gula___Dog.JPG

    • Rab
      Thanks, Diana. What are your references, especially for texts that translate Gula as Great (female) Healer? This certainly applies to some Tropical Pisceans
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 16, 2007
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        Thanks, Diana.
        What are your references, especially for texts
        that translate Gula as Great (female) Healer?
        This certainly applies to some Tropical Pisceans
        I've come to know lately.
        -=Rab

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Diana K Rosenberg" <fixed.stars@...>
        To: <thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, 13 February, 2007 4:04 PM
        Subject: [thefixedstars] Gula


        Rab sent

        RW: Ahh yes, Gula. I forget where I might have seen this linked
        with a goddess. Presumably from Babylonian -gu-, a water jug;
        but Gula is usually the (male) Giant or Big One. What do YOU have?
        ===========================================
        This is the Gula section, under the info on the constellation of Aquarius:

        GULA, THE GREAT DOCTORESS

        I am a physician, I know how to heal, I
        carry with me all the herbs...
        I am provided with a bag full of effective conjurations, I
        carry texts
        for healing, I effect cures for all...
        -
        The Gula Hymn of Bullutsa-rabi

        On very ancient Mesopotamian kudurru - boundary stones carved with
        constellation figures - the area we know as Aquarius, the Water-Pourer shows
        instead a seated goddess with her crouching dog: this was Earth-goddess
        Gula, "The Great Doctoress," daughter of Anu, God of Heaven, and consort of
        Ninib (Saturn). Gula was "Great One" or "Great Female Physician,"
        "life-giver" who could preserve the health of the body and remove sickness
        and disease "by the touch of her hand." Her power could be used for evil as
        well as good, and appeals to her could bring on the very diseases she was
        able to heal, or strike an enemy with blindness. Sometimes referred to as
        "lady of the netherworld" who restored the dead to life, Gula actually
        occupied a unique intermediate position between gods of the living and gods
        of the dead (some scholars feel she was originally a death goddess). Her
        dog, crouched beside her, was a guardian and psychopomp (spirit guide)
        mediating between lands of the dead and of the living. According to Grun's
        Timetables of History, between 3,000 and 2,500 BCE, "Sumerian medicine
        discovered the healing qualities of mineral springs." This would connect the
        concept of healing (Gula) and water (Urn), at just the time in history when
        the stars of the Urn marked the Winter Solstice. (As I worked to fit the
        kudurru representations of Gula into Aquarius' pattern of stars, with the
        limitations of Capricornus' tail to the west, the West Fish of Pisces to the
        north and Piscis Austrinus to the South, she came out with her upraised
        hands at the mouth of the Water-Pourer's Urn, as if summoning, blessing or
        bathing in its ever-flowing waters). Text fragments speak of her "basket" -
        perhaps that is what she is sitting on.


        Love, Diana

        Looking for pictures, just found this site:
        www.matrifocus.com/IMB06/images/Gula___Dog.JPG
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