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Re: [thefixedstars] Fixed star motions

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  • Arthyr
    At 12:44 PM 9/1/2006 -0400, Trish answered: In a message dated 9/1/2006 12:23:20 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, awc99@mindspring.com writes: What is the average
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 1, 2006
      At 12:44 PM 9/1/2006 -0400, Trish answered:
      In a message dated 9/1/2006 12:23:20 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, awc99@... writes:
      What is the average motion of fixed stars?

      I've read several different versions and I know this is the list
      to find the right answer.
      Hi Trish,
      Ya know, I did that once on an outside set of stairs. . . with the stairs passing me by at the same rate of speed the stars were, in that brief moment, the theory of
      relativity became very clear. . . (Great response BTW)

      Arthyr
      Laying in my lawnchair the other night watching them, one of the chair's supports gave way suddenly (it's rusted and difficult to "lock" in place) and those stars moved REALLY fast then ... couldn't say that speed was "average" though.   Average from the perspective of that chair maybe.
       
      Trish
    • msbhavens1
      Different stars move at different speeds, if you want a particular stars motion you might look at Ann Wrights page and compare the 1900 - 2000 positions for an
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 1, 2006
        Different stars move at different speeds, if you want a particular
        stars motion you might look at Ann Wrights page and compare the 1900 -
        2000 positions for an average.

        MissB
      • Arthyr
        Thanks Mis B. In my opinion we use precessional motion of one degreee every 72 years. . . just looking for confirmation. . . Thanks for Anne s site info. Lotza
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 1, 2006
          Thanks Mis B.

          In my opinion we use precessional motion of one degreee every 72 years. . .
          just looking for confirmation. . .

          Thanks for Anne's site info.

          Lotza love and thanks. . .

          Arthyr

          /.///////.

          At 05:52 PM 9/1/2006 +0000, Miss B wrote:
          >Different stars move at different speeds, if you want a particular
          >stars motion you might look at Ann Wrights page and compare the 1900 -
          >2000 positions for an average.
          >
          >MissB
        • msbhavens1
          You re welcome, I was trying to figure out different stars rates of movement not long ago for purpose of figureing out when they changed signs and used that
          Message 4 of 9 , Sep 1, 2006
            You're welcome, I was trying to figure out different stars rates of
            movement not long ago for purpose of figureing out when they changed
            signs and used that page, that's when i was noticing they didn't all
            have same rate of motion, I think it may be due more to their
            longitude? closer to the poles and would seem to precess faster than
            closer to the ecliptic/equator I think?

            MissB aka Beth

            --- In thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com, Arthyr <awc99@...> wrote:
            >
            > Thanks Mis B.
            >
            > In my opinion we use precessional motion of one degreee every 72
            years. . .
            > just looking for confirmation. . .
            >
            > Thanks for Anne's site info.
            >
            > Lotza love and thanks. . .
            >
            > Arthyr
            >
            > /.///////.
            >
            > At 05:52 PM 9/1/2006 +0000, Miss B wrote:
            > >Different stars move at different speeds, if you want a particular
            > >stars motion you might look at Ann Wrights page and compare the
            1900 -
            > >2000 positions for an average.
            > >
            > >MissB
            >
          • Trishmare7@aol.com
            Hi Arthyr, Thanks!--and yes, there s nothing like non-theoretical demonstrations of scientific principles to re-connect one with the planet! When things
            Message 5 of 9 , Sep 2, 2006
              Hi Arthyr,
               
              Thanks!--and yes, there's nothing like non-theoretical demonstrations of scientific principles to re-connect one with the planet!  When things like your stair adventure happen, I just remind myself that if the world didn't suck, we'd all fall off.
               
              Trish
               
              In a message dated 9/1/2006 1:38:01 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, awc99@... writes:
              Hi Trish,
              Ya know, I did that once on an outside set of stairs. . . with the stairs passing me by at the same rate of speed the stars were, in that brief moment, the theory of
              relativity became very clear. . . (Great response BTW)

              Arthyr
              Laying in my lawnchair the other night watching them, one of the chair's supports gave way suddenly (it's rusted and difficult to "lock" in place) and those stars moved REALLY fast then ... couldn't say that speed was "average" though.   Average from the perspective of that chair maybe.
              Trish
               
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