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Fixed star alignments (August 20, 2006)

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  • mahtezcatpoc
    Positions as of noon CDT. Asterisks indicate alignments that weren t there a week ago today (with an orb of 1 00 ). Jupiter *Menkent (Theta Centauri) *Alphecca
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 20, 2006
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      Positions as of noon CDT.

      Asterisks indicate alignments that weren't there a week ago today
      (with an orb of 1 00').


      Jupiter


      *Menkent (Theta Centauri)

      *Alphecca (Alpha Coronae Borealis)

      Acrux (Alpha Crucis)

      Mimosa (Beta Crucis)


      Neptune


      Sualocin (Alpha Delphini)

      Aldhanab (Gamma Gruis)

      Ghost-Ring Nebula (IC 5148/5150 Gruis)

      QU Vulpeculae (cataclysmic variable)



      Pluto


      Choo (Alpha Arae)

      Beta Arae

      Stingray Nebula (Henize 3-1357 Arae)

      Grumium (Xi Draconis)

      Lesath (Lambda Scorpii)

      Shaula (Upsilon Scorpii)

      Walnut Nebula (IRAS 17245-3951 Scorpii)



      Ceres

      *Sualocin (Alpha Delphini)

      *Ghost-Ring Nebula (IC 5148/5150 Gruis)

      *EF Tucanae

      *QU Vulpeculae (cataclysmic variables)



      Pallas


      Ramo (95 Herculis; marks the obsolete constellation Ramo, the Branch,
      which some pictorial maps show Hercules holding in his hand)

      Polarissima Australis (NGC 2573 Octantis, a galaxy
      even closer to the south celestial pole than Polaris
      Australis)

      Poniatovii (70 Ophiuchi; marks the obsolete
      constellation Taurus Poniatovii [Poniatovski's Bull]
      along with 68 and 69 Ophiuchi)

      Alnasl (Gamma Sagittarii)

      Spiculum (M8, M20, M21 Sagittarii; M8 and M20 are
      nicknamed the Lagoon Nebula and the Trifid Nebula,
      respectively; M21 is an open cluster)

      Red Spider Nebula (NGC 6537 Sagittarii)

      DZ Serpentis (cataclysmic variable)




      Juno


      *Lochium (Lambda Pyxidis; marking the obsolete constellation Lochium
      Funis, the Log and Line)

      *El Kophrah (Chi Ursae Majoris)

      *Miniature Spiral (NGC 3928 Ursae Majoris, a galaxy just east of El
      Kophrah)

      *Vela Pulsar (PSR B0833-45 Velorum)

      *BC Ursae Majoris (cataclysmic variable)



      Vesta


      *Thuban (Alpha Draconis)

      *SW Sextantis (cataclysmic variable)

      *Alula Australe (Xi Ursae Majoris)

      *CU Velorum (cataclysmic variable)



      Chiron


      *Bos (Rho Capricorni)

      Tarantula Nebula (NGC 2070 Doradus; in the part of
      Nubecula Major lying in Dorado the Mahimahi; aka 30
      Doradus)

      LU Vulpeculae

      LV Vulpeculae (cataclysmic variables)

      Cloverleaf Nebula (IRAS 19477+2401 Vulpeculae)



      North Node


      Matar (Eta Pegasi)

      Stephan's Quintet (a group of galaxies in Pegasus
      dominated by NGC 7317)



      South Node


      *Cor Caroli (Alpha Canum Venaticorum)

      Copula (M-51 Canum Venaticorum; aka the Whirlpool
      Galaxy)

      Sunflower Galaxy (M-63 Canum Venaticorum)


      More later.


      Mark A. Holmes
    • mahtezcatpoc
      ... listen: you don t have a leg to stand on (?) ... does this have something to do with Pluto s demotion ? (The small number of delegates to the IAU
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 30, 2006
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        --- In thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com, "mahtezcatpoc"
        <mahtezcatpoc@...> wrote:
        >
        > Positions as of noon CDT.
        >
        > Asterisks indicate alignments that weren't there a week ago today
        > (with an orb of 1 00').
        >
        >
        > Jupiter
        >
        >
        > *Menkent (Theta Centauri)
        >
        > *Alphecca (Alpha Coronae Borealis)
        >
        > Acrux (Alpha Crucis)
        >
        > Mimosa (Beta Crucis)
        >
        >
        > Neptune
        >
        >
        > Sualocin (Alpha Delphini)
        >
        > Aldhanab (Gamma Gruis)
        >
        > Ghost-Ring Nebula (IC 5148/5150 Gruis)
        >
        > QU Vulpeculae (cataclysmic variable)
        >
        >
        >
        > Pluto
        >
        >
        > Choo (Alpha Arae)
        >
        > Beta Arae
        >
        > Stingray Nebula (Henize 3-1357 Arae)
        >
        > Grumium (Xi Draconis)
        >
        > Lesath (Lambda Scorpii)
        >
        > Shaula (Upsilon Scorpii)
        >
        > Walnut Nebula (IRAS 17245-3951 Scorpii)
        >
        >
        >
        > Ceres
        >
        > *Sualocin (Alpha Delphini)
        >
        > *Ghost-Ring Nebula (IC 5148/5150 Gruis)
        >
        > *EF Tucanae

        "listen: you don't have a leg to stand on" (?)


        >
        > *QU Vulpeculae (cataclysmic variables)

        does this have something to do with Pluto's "demotion"? (The small
        number of delegates to the IAU conference who voted [Ghost-Ring
        Nebula], the questionable science [EF Tucanae], the suggestion that
        this may not be the final word on this issue [Sualocin].)


        >
        >
        >
        > Pallas
        >
        >
        > Ramo (95 Herculis; marks the obsolete constellation Ramo, the
        Branch,
        > which some pictorial maps show Hercules holding in his hand)
        >
        > Polarissima Australis (NGC 2573 Octantis, a galaxy
        > even closer to the south celestial pole than Polaris
        > Australis)
        >
        > Poniatovii (70 Ophiuchi; marks the obsolete
        > constellation Taurus Poniatovii [Poniatovski's Bull]
        > along with 68 and 69 Ophiuchi)
        >
        > Alnasl (Gamma Sagittarii)
        >
        > Spiculum (M8, M20, M21 Sagittarii; M8 and M20 are
        > nicknamed the Lagoon Nebula and the Trifid Nebula,
        > respectively; M21 is an open cluster)
        >
        > Red Spider Nebula (NGC 6537 Sagittarii)
        >
        > DZ Serpentis (cataclysmic variable)
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Juno
        >
        >
        > *Lochium (Lambda Pyxidis; marking the obsolete constellation
        Lochium
        > Funis, the Log and Line)
        >
        > *El Kophrah (Chi Ursae Majoris)
        >
        > *Miniature Spiral (NGC 3928 Ursae Majoris, a galaxy just east of El
        > Kophrah)
        >
        > *Vela Pulsar (PSR B0833-45 Velorum)
        >
        > *BC Ursae Majoris (cataclysmic variable)
        >
        >
        >
        > Vesta
        >
        >
        > *Thuban (Alpha Draconis)
        >
        > *SW Sextantis (cataclysmic variable)
        >
        > *Alula Australe (Xi Ursae Majoris)
        >
        > *CU Velorum (cataclysmic variable)
        >
        >
        >
        > Chiron
        >
        >
        > *Bos (Rho Capricorni)


        speeds up a process, it looks like to me


        >
        > Tarantula Nebula (NGC 2070 Doradus; in the part of
        > Nubecula Major lying in Dorado the Mahimahi; aka 30
        > Doradus)
        >
        > LU Vulpeculae
        >
        > LV Vulpeculae (cataclysmic variables)
        >
        > Cloverleaf Nebula (IRAS 19477+2401 Vulpeculae)
        >
        >
        >
        > North Node
        >
        >
        > Matar (Eta Pegasi)
        >
        > Stephan's Quintet (a group of galaxies in Pegasus
        > dominated by NGC 7317)
        >
        >
        >
        > South Node
        >
        >
        > *Cor Caroli (Alpha Canum Venaticorum)


        >
        > Copula (M-51 Canum Venaticorum; aka the Whirlpool
        > Galaxy)
        >
        > Sunflower Galaxy (M-63 Canum Venaticorum)
        >



        More later.


        Mark A. Holmes
      • Arthyr
        Hi All, What is the average motion of fixed stars? I ve read several different versions and I know this is the list to find the right answer. Arthyr,
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 1, 2006
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          Hi All,

          What is the average motion of fixed stars?

          I've read several different versions and I know this is the list
          to find the right answer.

          Arthyr,
        • Trishmare7@aol.com
          In a message dated 9/1/2006 12:23:20 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, awc99@mindspring.com writes: What is the average motion of fixed stars? I ve read several
          Message 4 of 9 , Sep 1, 2006
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            In a message dated 9/1/2006 12:23:20 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, awc99@... writes:
            What is the average motion of fixed stars?

            I've read several different versions and I know this is the list
            to find the right answer.
            Laying in my lawnchair the other night watching them, one of the chair's supports gave way suddenly (it's rusted and difficult to "lock" in place) and those stars moved REALLY fast then ... couldn't say that speed was "average" though.   Average from the perspective of that chair maybe.
             
            Trish
          • Arthyr
            At 12:44 PM 9/1/2006 -0400, Trish answered: In a message dated 9/1/2006 12:23:20 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, awc99@mindspring.com writes: What is the average
            Message 5 of 9 , Sep 1, 2006
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              At 12:44 PM 9/1/2006 -0400, Trish answered:
              In a message dated 9/1/2006 12:23:20 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, awc99@... writes:
              What is the average motion of fixed stars?

              I've read several different versions and I know this is the list
              to find the right answer.
              Hi Trish,
              Ya know, I did that once on an outside set of stairs. . . with the stairs passing me by at the same rate of speed the stars were, in that brief moment, the theory of
              relativity became very clear. . . (Great response BTW)

              Arthyr
              Laying in my lawnchair the other night watching them, one of the chair's supports gave way suddenly (it's rusted and difficult to "lock" in place) and those stars moved REALLY fast then ... couldn't say that speed was "average" though.   Average from the perspective of that chair maybe.
               
              Trish
            • msbhavens1
              Different stars move at different speeds, if you want a particular stars motion you might look at Ann Wrights page and compare the 1900 - 2000 positions for an
              Message 6 of 9 , Sep 1, 2006
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                Different stars move at different speeds, if you want a particular
                stars motion you might look at Ann Wrights page and compare the 1900 -
                2000 positions for an average.

                MissB
              • Arthyr
                Thanks Mis B. In my opinion we use precessional motion of one degreee every 72 years. . . just looking for confirmation. . . Thanks for Anne s site info. Lotza
                Message 7 of 9 , Sep 1, 2006
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                  Thanks Mis B.

                  In my opinion we use precessional motion of one degreee every 72 years. . .
                  just looking for confirmation. . .

                  Thanks for Anne's site info.

                  Lotza love and thanks. . .

                  Arthyr

                  /.///////.

                  At 05:52 PM 9/1/2006 +0000, Miss B wrote:
                  >Different stars move at different speeds, if you want a particular
                  >stars motion you might look at Ann Wrights page and compare the 1900 -
                  >2000 positions for an average.
                  >
                  >MissB
                • msbhavens1
                  You re welcome, I was trying to figure out different stars rates of movement not long ago for purpose of figureing out when they changed signs and used that
                  Message 8 of 9 , Sep 1, 2006
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                    You're welcome, I was trying to figure out different stars rates of
                    movement not long ago for purpose of figureing out when they changed
                    signs and used that page, that's when i was noticing they didn't all
                    have same rate of motion, I think it may be due more to their
                    longitude? closer to the poles and would seem to precess faster than
                    closer to the ecliptic/equator I think?

                    MissB aka Beth

                    --- In thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com, Arthyr <awc99@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Thanks Mis B.
                    >
                    > In my opinion we use precessional motion of one degreee every 72
                    years. . .
                    > just looking for confirmation. . .
                    >
                    > Thanks for Anne's site info.
                    >
                    > Lotza love and thanks. . .
                    >
                    > Arthyr
                    >
                    > /.///////.
                    >
                    > At 05:52 PM 9/1/2006 +0000, Miss B wrote:
                    > >Different stars move at different speeds, if you want a particular
                    > >stars motion you might look at Ann Wrights page and compare the
                    1900 -
                    > >2000 positions for an average.
                    > >
                    > >MissB
                    >
                  • Trishmare7@aol.com
                    Hi Arthyr, Thanks!--and yes, there s nothing like non-theoretical demonstrations of scientific principles to re-connect one with the planet! When things
                    Message 9 of 9 , Sep 2, 2006
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                      Hi Arthyr,
                       
                      Thanks!--and yes, there's nothing like non-theoretical demonstrations of scientific principles to re-connect one with the planet!  When things like your stair adventure happen, I just remind myself that if the world didn't suck, we'd all fall off.
                       
                      Trish
                       
                      In a message dated 9/1/2006 1:38:01 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, awc99@... writes:
                      Hi Trish,
                      Ya know, I did that once on an outside set of stairs. . . with the stairs passing me by at the same rate of speed the stars were, in that brief moment, the theory of
                      relativity became very clear. . . (Great response BTW)

                      Arthyr
                      Laying in my lawnchair the other night watching them, one of the chair's supports gave way suddenly (it's rusted and difficult to "lock" in place) and those stars moved REALLY fast then ... couldn't say that speed was "average" though.   Average from the perspective of that chair maybe.
                      Trish
                       
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