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Adding celestial bodies to SolarFire (was Re: Oops - my error)

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  • mahtezcatpoc
    ... Click on Chart Options on the menu bar, then Files, then Fixed Star Files. A dialog box titled File Management will come up. BRADY.FST comes with the
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 10, 2006
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      --- In thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com, Shawhouse <shawhouse@...> wrote:
      >
      > Mark, If you can do so without much effort, can you explain how to add
      > newly discovered placements to Solarfire?
      > Diana Shaw

      Click on Chart Options on the menu bar, then Files, then Fixed Star
      Files. A dialog box titled File Management will come up. BRADY.FST
      comes with the software; I think the stars in it are ones that
      Bernadette has studied closely and published about and there's
      commentary on each star that I think either she wrote or was inspired
      by her work. You can create star files of your own by clicking on the
      button marked Create on the right side of this dialog box. I would
      suggest doing that and saving your new stars to a file you create
      rather than to the Brady file.

      To add stars, click on the button marked Edit. Another dialog box will
      come up. Click on Add to add stars, then key into the appropriate text
      boxes the proper name or designation of the star (Bayer, Flamsteed,
      Argelander or whatever), and its 2000 right ascension and declination.
      The software will automatically convert them into zodiacal longitude
      values.


      You might also want to add the star or other object's constellation by
      selecting it from the drop-down menu (and key into the proper text
      boxes the object's Bayer-system letter/Flamsteed number/Argelander
      designation/Messier, NGC, IC or other catalog number, if applicable).
      You can also key in the star's spectral type, apparent magnitude, even
      its rate of proper motion by right-ascension and declination, as well
      as comments like about its influence, where it is in a constellation
      figure, catalog numbers that it goes by that are too long to fit in
      the text boxes, its nature (like if it's a galaxy, planetary nebula,
      diffuse nebula, open cluster, globular cluster, nova or other variable
      star, supernova, pulsar, quasar, black hole, etc.), or whatever else
      is special about it.

      Be sure to save your work when you're through. The software will
      prompt you if you don't.

      Mark A. Holmes
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