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Great Attractor

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  • Diana K. Rosenberg
    Derek Reveres sent this to another list: http://www.world-science.net/exclusives/060419_attractorfrm.htm Wall of galaxies tugs on ours, astronomers find April
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 19, 2006
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      Great Attractor

      Derek Reveres sent this to another list:

      http://www.world-science.net/exclusives/060419_attractorfrm.htm

      Wall of galaxies tugs on ours, astronomers find

      April 19, 2006
      Special to World Science

      Researchers say they’ve filled in a key piece of the map of our local universe, by discovering a mighty wall of galaxies that may be the “Great Attractor” astronomers have been trying to identify for years.

      The “Great Attractor” is a distant, mysterious entity that seems to be tugging millions of galaxies, including ours, rapidly toward itself.

      The new findings suggest these motions are the result of gravitational forces from not one, but two things: the wall, and a conglomerate of galaxies far beyond it.

      It seems “roughly 50% of our galaxies’ motion through space is due to [the wall] and about 50% is due to structures behind it,” wrote Dale Kocevski of the University of Hawaii in an email. Kocevski is a member of one of the research teams that reported the findings.

      Astronomers have known for years that something seems to be pulling our Milky Way and other galaxies toward itself at a breakneck 22 million kilometers (14 million miles) per hour.

      But they couldn’t before now pinpoint exactly what or where it is.

      Although it’s tugging on us, we’ll never reach it, said David Radburn-Smith the University of Durham, U.K., whose team identified the “wall.” That’s because the expansion of the universe is stretching the wall’s neighborhood away from ours about nine times faster than the speed with which gravity is drawing them together. The stretching effect would be still swifter for further objects.

      Radburn-Smith and colleagues described the “wall” in a new paper accepted for publication in the research journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. It “does appear to be a wall-like slab of galaxies,”

      he wrote in an email, though its precise shape is “tricky to define” because the dust of our Milky Way galaxy obscures much of it.

      Radburn-Smith, a Ph.D. student, is the paper’s lead author.

      He added that the wall contains the weight equivalent of some 12,000 Milky Way galaxies, and is around 200 million light-years away. A light-year is the distance light travels in a year.

      The wall seems to sweep over an angle of about 100 degrees near the top of the Southern Hemisphere sky, the astronomers wrote; this distance corresponds to some 400 million light-years. One end would be roughly in the direction the star Mu Velorum in the constellation Vela, the other in the vicinity of Al Dhanab in the constellation Grus.

      In between, the structure curves into the silvery strip of the Milky Way, they reported, where it merges with a cluster of galaxies called Normaroughly in the direction of the star Beta Trianguli Australis in the Southern Triangle constellation. One member of the team, Patrick Woudt of the 3University of Cape Town, South Africa, proposed previously that Norma marks the core concentration of the Great Attractor’s mass.

      The researchers drew their results from an array of galactic distance measurements based on redshiftthe reddening of light from galaxies.

      Further-off galaxies are redder because as the universe expands, it pulls objects apart from each other, “stretching” light waves traveling between them. The greater the distance between objects, the stronger the effect.

      Surveys of the universe at its largest scales have found that galaxies are arranged into a sponge-like structure, with sheets and filaments of galaxies surrounding nearly empty voids. Places where these sheets and filaments intersect are sometimes called “knots,” as they tend to have dense concentrations of galaxies that are merging.

      Radburn-Smith said his findings help clarify our place in this sort of structure.

      The Milky Way and its neighboring Andromeda galaxy, along with some 30 smaller ones, “form what is known as the Local Group,” he explained in an email. This lies on the outskirts of a “supercluster”a grouping of thousands of galaxiesknown as Virgo, which is also pulled toward the Great Attractor.

      The Virgo Supercluster is centered on a “knot,” he added. The Local Group lies on a broad filament protruding from this knot. Another filament also branches off from itat right angles to oursand extends to a second knot, known as the Centaurus cluster, he added.

      From there, yet another filament stretches toward a third knot, the “Norma Cluster,” which is part of the Great Attractor wall, he explained. “There’s no direct connection between our galaxy and the Great Attractor.”

      Astronomers have previously found other sheet-like conglomerations of galaxies described as “Great Walls.” This newfound structure may be similar, Radburn-Smith suggested.

      But Kocevski said his own work shows the wall and associated structures lack enough mass to provide the gravitational pull hitherto attributed to the Great Attractor. Thus, he proposes that more mass lies beyond the wall.

      In findings presented Jan. 11 at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Washington, D.C., Kocevski, also a doctoral student, and other researchers at his institution said a major concentration of galaxies lies beyond the Great Attractor. They’re near the so-called Shapley Supercluster, 500 million light-years awaythe most massive known supercluster.

      Kocevski wrote in an email that his and Radburn-Smith’s findings could both be correct; in fact, “our work mapping X-ray luminous galaxy clusters in the Great Attractor region has reached the same conclusion” as Radburn-Smith.

      “The pull our galaxy is feeling is most likely due to both the nearby Great Attractor and these more distant structures.”

      The researchers are using the name “Great Attractor” only for the wall and related structures, not these much further objects. The naming is in line with past practice: astronomers had long suspected the Great Attractor lay in the neighborhood now being fingered as the abode of the wall. Thus they called that zone, but not the area behind it, the “Great Attractor region.”


      Website: http://pw1.netcom.com/~ye-stars/

    • Derek Reveres
      i thought i sent it to this list too ;) figured our star people would love to check this out. For those astronomy geeks here, there are a few other worth-while
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 19, 2006
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        i thought i sent it to this list too ;) figured our star people would love
        to check this out.
        For those astronomy geeks here, there are a few other worth-while articles
        on the site as well. One discusses two black holes that are merging.
        Another talks a little about multiverse theories- pretty generic, but
        still.... Interesting stuff.


        >From: "Diana K. Rosenberg" <ye-stars@...>
        >Reply-To: thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com
        >To: <thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com>
        >Subject: [thefixedstars] Great Attractor
        >Date: Wed, 19 Apr 2006 18:26:03 -0400
        >
        >Derek Reveres sent this to another list:
        >
        >http://www.world-science.net/exclusives/060419_attractorfrm.htm
        >
        >Wall of galaxies tugs on ours, astronomers find
        >
        >April 19, 2006
        >Special to World Science
        >
        >Researchers say they've filled in a key piece of the map of our local
        >universe, by discovering a mighty wall of galaxies that may be the "Great
        >Attractor" astronomers have been trying to identify for years.
        >
        >The "Great Attractor" is a distant, mysterious entity that seems to be
        >tugging millions of galaxies, including ours, rapidly toward itself.
        >
        >The new findings suggest these motions are the result of gravitational
        >forces from not one, but two things: the wall, and a conglomerate of
        >galaxies far beyond it.
        >
        >It seems "roughly 50% of our galaxies' motion through space is due to [the
        >wall] and about 50% is due to structures behind it," wrote Dale Kocevski of
        >the University of Hawaii in an email. Kocevski is a member of one of the
        >research teams that reported the findings.
        >
        >Astronomers have known for years that something seems to be pulling our
        >Milky Way and other galaxies toward itself at a breakneck 22 million
        >kilometers (14 million miles) per hour.
        >
        >But they couldn't before now pinpoint exactly what or where it is.
        >
        >Although it's tugging on us, we'll never reach it, said David Radburn-Smith
        >the University of Durham, U.K., whose team identified the "wall." That's
        >because the expansion of the universe is stretching the wall's neighborhood
        >away from ours about nine times faster than the speed with which gravity is
        >drawing them together. The stretching effect would be still swifter for
        >further objects.
        >
        >Radburn-Smith and colleagues described the "wall" in a new paper accepted
        >for publication in the research journal Monthly Notices of the Royal
        >Astronomical Society. It "does appear to be a wall-like slab of galaxies,"
        >he wrote in an email, though its precise shape is "tricky to define"
        >because
        >the dust of our Milky Way galaxy obscures much of it.
        >
        >Radburn-Smith, a Ph.D. student, is the paper's lead author.
        >
        >He added that the wall contains the weight equivalent of some 12,000 Milky
        >Way galaxies, and is around 200 million light-years away. A light-year is
        >the distance light travels in a year.
        >
        >The wall seems to sweep over an angle of about 100 degrees near the top of
        >the Southern Hemisphere sky, the astronomers wrote; this distance
        >corresponds to some 400 million light-years. One end would be roughly in
        >the
        >direction the star Mu Velorum in the constellation Vela, the other in the
        >vicinity of Al Dhanab in the constellation Grus.
        >
        >In between, the structure curves into the silvery strip of the Milky Way,
        >they reported, where it merges with a cluster of galaxies called
        >Norma-roughly in the direction of the star Beta Trianguli Australis in the
        >Southern Triangle constellation. One member of the team, Patrick Woudt of
        >the 3University of Cape Town, South Africa, proposed previously that Norma
        >marks the core concentration of the Great Attractor's mass.
        >
        >The researchers drew their results from an array of galactic distance
        >measurements based on redshift-the reddening of light from galaxies.
        >Further-off galaxies are redder because as the universe expands, it pulls
        >objects apart from each other, "stretching" light waves traveling between
        >them. The greater the distance between objects, the stronger the effect.
        >
        >Surveys of the universe at its largest scales have found that galaxies are
        >arranged into a sponge-like structure, with sheets and filaments of
        >galaxies
        >surrounding nearly empty voids. Places where these sheets and filaments
        >intersect are sometimes called "knots," as they tend to have dense
        >concentrations of galaxies that are merging.
        >
        >Radburn-Smith said his findings help clarify our place in this sort of
        >structure.
        >
        >The Milky Way and its neighboring Andromeda galaxy, along with some 30
        >smaller ones, "form what is known as the Local Group," he explained in an
        >email. This lies on the outskirts of a "supercluster"-a grouping of
        >thousands of galaxies-known as Virgo, which is also pulled toward the Great
        >Attractor.
        >
        >The Virgo Supercluster is centered on a "knot," he added. The Local Group
        >lies on a broad filament protruding from this knot. Another filament also
        >branches off from it-at right angles to ours-and extends to a second knot,
        >known as the Centaurus cluster, he added.
        >
        >From there, yet another filament stretches toward a third knot, the "Norma
        >Cluster," which is part of the Great Attractor wall, he explained. "There's
        >no direct connection between our galaxy and the Great Attractor."
        >
        >Astronomers have previously found other sheet-like conglomerations of
        >galaxies described as "Great Walls." This newfound structure may be
        >similar,
        >Radburn-Smith suggested.
        >
        >But Kocevski said his own work shows the wall and associated structures
        >lack
        >enough mass to provide the gravitational pull hitherto attributed to the
        >Great Attractor. Thus, he proposes that more mass lies beyond the wall.
        >
        >In findings presented Jan. 11 at the American Astronomical Society meeting
        >in Washington, D.C., Kocevski, also a doctoral student, and other
        >researchers at his institution said a major concentration of galaxies lies
        >beyond the Great Attractor. They're near the so-called Shapley
        >Supercluster,
        >500 million light-years away-the most massive known supercluster.
        >
        >Kocevski wrote in an email that his and Radburn-Smith's findings could both
        >be correct; in fact, "our work mapping X-ray luminous galaxy clusters in
        >the
        >Great Attractor region has reached the same conclusion" as Radburn-Smith.
        >"The pull our galaxy is feeling is most likely due to both the nearby Great
        >Attractor and these more distant structures."
        >
        >The researchers are using the name "Great Attractor" only for the wall and
        >related structures, not these much further objects. The naming is in line
        >with past practice: astronomers had long suspected the Great Attractor lay
        >in the neighborhood now being fingered as the abode of the wall. Thus they
        >called that zone, but not the area behind it, the "Great Attractor region."
        >
        >
        >Website: http://pw1.netcom.com/~ye-stars/
        >
      • Mark Andrew Holmes
        Eric Francis said something about the Great Attractor pulling you into the zone of influence of something higher, larger and more powerful than yourself. Mark
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 19, 2006
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          Eric Francis said something about the Great Attractor
          pulling you into the zone of influence of something
          higher, larger and more powerful than yourself.

          Mark A. Holmes

          --- Derek Reveres <l_awake_l@...> wrote:

          > i thought i sent it to this list too ;) figured our
          > star people would love
          > to check this out.
          > For those astronomy geeks here, there are a few
          > other worth-while articles
          > on the site as well. One discusses two black holes
          > that are merging.
          > Another talks a little about multiverse theories-
          > pretty generic, but
          > still.... Interesting stuff.
          >
          >
          > >From: "Diana K. Rosenberg" <ye-stars@...>
          > >Reply-To: thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com
          > >To: <thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com>
          > >Subject: [thefixedstars] Great Attractor
          > >Date: Wed, 19 Apr 2006 18:26:03 -0400
          > >
          > >Derek Reveres sent this to another list:
          > >
          >
          >http://www.world-science.net/exclusives/060419_attractorfrm.htm
          > >
          > >Wall of galaxies tugs on ours, astronomers find
          > >
          > >April 19, 2006
          > >Special to World Science
          > >
          > >Researchers say they've filled in a key piece of
          > the map of our local
          > >universe, by discovering a mighty wall of galaxies
          > that may be the "Great
          > >Attractor" astronomers have been trying to identify
          > for years.
          > >
          > >The "Great Attractor" is a distant, mysterious
          > entity that seems to be
          > >tugging millions of galaxies, including ours,
          > rapidly toward itself.
          > >
          > >The new findings suggest these motions are the
          > result of gravitational
          > >forces from not one, but two things: the wall, and
          > a conglomerate of
          > >galaxies far beyond it.
          > >
          > >It seems "roughly 50% of our galaxies' motion
          > through space is due to [the
          > >wall] and about 50% is due to structures behind
          > it," wrote Dale Kocevski of
          > >the University of Hawaii in an email. Kocevski is a
          > member of one of the
          > >research teams that reported the findings.
          > >
          > >Astronomers have known for years that something
          > seems to be pulling our
          > >Milky Way and other galaxies toward itself at a
          > breakneck 22 million
          > >kilometers (14 million miles) per hour.
          > >
          > >But they couldn't before now pinpoint exactly what
          > or where it is.
          > >
          > >Although it's tugging on us, we'll never reach it,
          > said David Radburn-Smith
          > >the University of Durham, U.K., whose team
          > identified the "wall." That's
          > >because the expansion of the universe is stretching
          > the wall's neighborhood
          > >away from ours about nine times faster than the
          > speed with which gravity is
          > >drawing them together. The stretching effect would
          > be still swifter for
          > >further objects.
          > >
          > >Radburn-Smith and colleagues described the "wall"
          > in a new paper accepted
          > >for publication in the research journal Monthly
          > Notices of the Royal
          > >Astronomical Society. It "does appear to be a
          > wall-like slab of galaxies,"
          > >he wrote in an email, though its precise shape is
          > "tricky to define"
          > >because
          > >the dust of our Milky Way galaxy obscures much of
          > it.
          > >
          > >Radburn-Smith, a Ph.D. student, is the paper's lead
          > author.
          > >
          > >He added that the wall contains the weight
          > equivalent of some 12,000 Milky
          > >Way galaxies, and is around 200 million light-years
          > away. A light-year is
          > >the distance light travels in a year.
          > >
          > >The wall seems to sweep over an angle of about 100
          > degrees near the top of
          > >the Southern Hemisphere sky, the astronomers wrote;
          > this distance
          > >corresponds to some 400 million light-years. One
          > end would be roughly in
          > >the
          > >direction the star Mu Velorum in the constellation
          > Vela, the other in the
          > >vicinity of Al Dhanab in the constellation Grus.
          > >
          > >In between, the structure curves into the silvery
          > strip of the Milky Way,
          > >they reported, where it merges with a cluster of
          > galaxies called
          > >Norma-roughly in the direction of the star Beta
          > Trianguli Australis in the
          > >Southern Triangle constellation. One member of the
          > team, Patrick Woudt of
          > >the 3University of Cape Town, South Africa,
          > proposed previously that Norma
          > >marks the core concentration of the Great
          > Attractor's mass.
          > >
          > >The researchers drew their results from an array of
          > galactic distance
          > >measurements based on redshift-the reddening of
          > light from galaxies.
          > >Further-off galaxies are redder because as the
          > universe expands, it pulls
          > >objects apart from each other, "stretching" light
          > waves traveling between
          > >them. The greater the distance between objects, the
          > stronger the effect.
          > >
          > >Surveys of the universe at its largest scales have
          > found that galaxies are
          > >arranged into a sponge-like structure, with sheets
          > and filaments of
          > >galaxies
          > >surrounding nearly empty voids. Places where these
          > sheets and filaments
          > >intersect are sometimes called "knots," as they
          > tend to have dense
          > >concentrations of galaxies that are merging.
          > >
          > >Radburn-Smith said his findings help clarify our
          > place in this sort of
          > >structure.
          > >
          > >The Milky Way and its neighboring Andromeda galaxy,
          > along with some 30
          > >smaller ones, "form what is known as the Local
          > Group," he explained in an
          > >email. This lies on the outskirts of a
          > "supercluster"-a grouping of
          > >thousands of galaxies-known as Virgo, which is also
          > pulled toward the Great
          > >Attractor.
          > >
          > >The Virgo Supercluster is centered on a "knot," he
          > added. The Local Group
          > >lies on a broad filament protruding from this knot.
          > Another filament also
          > >branches off from it-at right angles to ours-and
          > extends to a second knot,
          > >known as the Centaurus cluster, he added.
          > >
          > >From there, yet another filament stretches toward a
          > third knot, the "Norma
          > >Cluster," which is part of the Great Attractor
          > wall, he explained. "There's
          > >no direct connection between our galaxy and the
          > Great Attractor."
          > >
          > >Astronomers have previously found other sheet-like
          > conglomerations of
          > >galaxies described as "Great Walls." This newfound
          > structure may be
          > >similar,
          > >Radburn-Smith suggested.
          > >
          > >But Kocevski said his own work shows the wall and
          > associated structures
          > >lack
          > >enough mass to provide the gravitational pull
          > hitherto attributed to the
          > >Great Attractor. Thus, he proposes that more mass
          > lies beyond the wall.
          > >
          > >In findings presented Jan. 11 at the American
          > Astronomical Society meeting
          > >in Washington, D.C., Kocevski, also a doctoral
          > student, and other
          > >researchers at his institution said a major
          > concentration of galaxies lies
          > >beyond the Great Attractor. They're near the
          > so-called Shapley
          > >Supercluster,
          > >500 million light-years away-the most massive known
          > supercluster.
          > >
          > >Kocevski wrote in an email that his and
          > Radburn-Smith's findings could both
          > >be correct; in fact, "our work mapping X-ray
          > luminous galaxy clusters in
          >
          === message truncated ===


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        • Mark Andrew Holmes
          ... Not his exact words, but sort of a paraphrase. Mark A. Holmes __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 19, 2006
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            --- Mark Andrew Holmes <mahtezcatpoc@...> wrote:

            > Eric Francis said something about the Great
            > Attractor
            > pulling you into the zone of influence of something
            > higher, larger and more powerful than yourself.


            Not his exact words, but sort of a paraphrase.

            Mark A. Holmes

            __________________________________________________
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          • Shawhouse
            Eric Francis says the Great Attractor is at 14Sago2, which is conjunct my 3rd house SN (True Node 12Sag56/Mean Node 14Sag03). Diana Shaw
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 19, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              Eric Francis says the Great Attractor is at 14Sago2, which is conjunct
              my 3rd house SN (True Node 12Sag56/Mean Node 14Sag03).
              Diana Shaw

              Derek Reveres wrote:

              > i thought i sent it to this list too ;) figured our star people would
              > love
              > to check this out.
              > For those astronomy geeks here, there are a few other worth-while
              > articles
              > on the site as well. One discusses two black holes that are merging.
              > Another talks a little about multiverse theories- pretty generic, but
              > still.... Interesting stuff.
              >
              >
              > >From: "Diana K. Rosenberg" <ye-stars@...>
              > >Reply-To: thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com
              > >To: <thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com>
              > >Subject: [thefixedstars] Great Attractor
              > >Date: Wed, 19 Apr 2006 18:26:03 -0400
              > >
              > >Derek Reveres sent this to another list:
              > >
              > >http://www.world-science.net/exclusives/060419_attractorfrm.htm
              > >
              > >Wall of galaxies tugs on ours, astronomers find
              > >
              > >April 19, 2006
              > >Special to World Science
              > >
              > >Researchers say they've filled in a key piece of the map of our local
              > >universe, by discovering a mighty wall of galaxies that may be the "Great
              > >Attractor" astronomers have been trying to identify for years.
              > >
              > >The "Great Attractor" is a distant, mysterious entity that seems to be
              > >tugging millions of galaxies, including ours, rapidly toward itself.
              > >
              > >The new findings suggest these motions are the result of gravitational
              > >forces from not one, but two things: the wall, and a conglomerate of
              > >galaxies far beyond it.
              > >
              > >It seems "roughly 50% of our galaxies' motion through space is due to
              > [the
              > >wall] and about 50% is due to structures behind it," wrote Dale
              > Kocevski of
              > >the University of Hawaii in an email. Kocevski is a member of one of the
              > >research teams that reported the findings.
              > >
              > >Astronomers have known for years that something seems to be pulling our
              > >Milky Way and other galaxies toward itself at a breakneck 22 million
              > >kilometers (14 million miles) per hour.
              > >
              > >But they couldn't before now pinpoint exactly what or where it is.
              > >
              > >Although it's tugging on us, we'll never reach it, said David
              > Radburn-Smith
              > >the University of Durham, U.K., whose team identified the "wall." That's
              > >because the expansion of the universe is stretching the wall's
              > neighborhood
              > >away from ours about nine times faster than the speed with which
              > gravity is
              > >drawing them together. The stretching effect would be still swifter for
              > >further objects.
              > >
              > >Radburn-Smith and colleagues described the "wall" in a new paper accepted
              > >for publication in the research journal Monthly Notices of the Royal
              > >Astronomical Society. It "does appear to be a wall-like slab of
              > galaxies,"
              > >he wrote in an email, though its precise shape is "tricky to define"
              > >because
              > >the dust of our Milky Way galaxy obscures much of it.
              > >
              > >Radburn-Smith, a Ph.D. student, is the paper's lead author.
              > >
              > >He added that the wall contains the weight equivalent of some 12,000
              > Milky
              > >Way galaxies, and is around 200 million light-years away. A light-year is
              > >the distance light travels in a year.
              > >
              > >The wall seems to sweep over an angle of about 100 degrees near the
              > top of
              > >the Southern Hemisphere sky, the astronomers wrote; this distance
              > >corresponds to some 400 million light-years. One end would be roughly in
              > >the
              > >direction the star Mu Velorum in the constellation Vela, the other in the
              > >vicinity of Al Dhanab in the constellation Grus.
              > >
              > >In between, the structure curves into the silvery strip of the Milky Way,
              > >they reported, where it merges with a cluster of galaxies called
              > >Norma-roughly in the direction of the star Beta Trianguli Australis
              > in the
              > >Southern Triangle constellation. One member of the team, Patrick Woudt of
              > >the 3University of Cape Town, South Africa, proposed previously that
              > Norma
              > >marks the core concentration of the Great Attractor's mass.
              > >
              > >The researchers drew their results from an array of galactic distance
              > >measurements based on redshift-the reddening of light from galaxies.
              > >Further-off galaxies are redder because as the universe expands, it pulls
              > >objects apart from each other, "stretching" light waves traveling between
              > >them. The greater the distance between objects, the stronger the effect.
              > >
              > >Surveys of the universe at its largest scales have found that
              > galaxies are
              > >arranged into a sponge-like structure, with sheets and filaments of
              > >galaxies
              > >surrounding nearly empty voids. Places where these sheets and filaments
              > >intersect are sometimes called "knots," as they tend to have dense
              > >concentrations of galaxies that are merging.
              > >
              > >Radburn-Smith said his findings help clarify our place in this sort of
              > >structure.
              > >
              > >The Milky Way and its neighboring Andromeda galaxy, along with some 30
              > >smaller ones, "form what is known as the Local Group," he explained in an
              > >email. This lies on the outskirts of a "supercluster"-a grouping of
              > >thousands of galaxies-known as Virgo, which is also pulled toward the
              > Great
              > >Attractor.
              > >
              > >The Virgo Supercluster is centered on a "knot," he added. The Local Group
              > >lies on a broad filament protruding from this knot. Another filament also
              > >branches off from it-at right angles to ours-and extends to a second
              > knot,
              > >known as the Centaurus cluster, he added.
              > >
              > >From there, yet another filament stretches toward a third knot, the
              > "Norma
              > >Cluster," which is part of the Great Attractor wall, he explained.
              > "There's
              > >no direct connection between our galaxy and the Great Attractor."
              > >
              > >Astronomers have previously found other sheet-like conglomerations of
              > >galaxies described as "Great Walls." This newfound structure may be
              > >similar,
              > >Radburn-Smith suggested.
              > >
              > >But Kocevski said his own work shows the wall and associated structures
              > >lack
              > >enough mass to provide the gravitational pull hitherto attributed to the
              > >Great Attractor. Thus, he proposes that more mass lies beyond the wall.
              > >
              > >In findings presented Jan. 11 at the American Astronomical Society
              > meeting
              > >in Washington, D.C., Kocevski, also a doctoral student, and other
              > >researchers at his institution said a major concentration of galaxies
              > lies
              > >beyond the Great Attractor. They're near the so-called Shapley
              > >Supercluster,
              > >500 million light-years away-the most massive known supercluster.
              > >
              > >Kocevski wrote in an email that his and Radburn-Smith's findings
              > could both
              > >be correct; in fact, "our work mapping X-ray luminous galaxy clusters in
              > >the
              > >Great Attractor region has reached the same conclusion" as Radburn-Smith.
              > >"The pull our galaxy is feeling is most likely due to both the nearby
              > Great
              > >Attractor and these more distant structures."
              > >
              > >The researchers are using the name "Great Attractor" only for the
              > wall and
              > >related structures, not these much further objects. The naming is in line
              > >with past practice: astronomers had long suspected the Great
              > Attractor lay
              > >in the neighborhood now being fingered as the abode of the wall. Thus
              > they
              > >called that zone, but not the area behind it, the "Great Attractor
              > region."
              > >
              > >
              > >Website: http://pw1.netcom.com/~ye-stars/
              > <http://pw1.netcom.com/%7Eye-stars/>
              > >
              >
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            • Diana K Rosenberg
              Mark sent 1b. The Great Attractor (was: Norma) Posted by: Mark Andrew Holmes mahtezcatpoc@yahoo.com mahtezcatpoc Date: Mon Apr 16, 2007 9:14 pm ((PDT)) ... I
              Message 6 of 6 , Apr 17, 2007
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                Great Attractor

                Mark sent

                1b. The Great Attractor (was: Norma)
                    Posted by: "Mark Andrew Holmes" mahtezcatpoc@... mahtezcatpoc
                    Date: Mon Apr 16, 2007 9:14 pm ((PDT))

                --- Diana K Rosenberg <fixed.stars@...> wrote:

                > Norma stars: (positions are for 1980; for 2000, add
                > 17 minutes; for 2005,
                > add 21 minutes.

                > "The Great Attractor" GxClstr Abell3627  TrA/Nor
                > brder 13SA45  -38 54  -60
                > 55    16 14   ------  GX Clustr

                I think this object is in Triangulum Australe.

                http://nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu/cgi-bin/nph-objsearch?objname=Norma+Cluster

                16h15m32.8s     -60d54m30s

                The galaxy cluster Abell 3627 may be in both Triangulum Australe and Norma, but these coordinates (the center of the cluster?) is in Triangulum Australe, close to the border of Norma, about halfway between Iota-2 Normae and Delta Trianguli Australe.

                ]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]

                Yes - I have the GA listed under both Norma and TrA

                I apologize for the messed-up alignments in the list I sent -
                I sent a neat list - it came thru as a confused mess...

                Love, Diana

                Website: http://ye-stars.com

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