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Novae, etc

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  • Diana K. Rosenberg
    Mark sent: Date: Wed, 05 Apr 2006 02:25:09 -0000 From: mahtezcatpoc Subject: Re: Novae ... ...also known as CP Puppis...
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 5, 2006
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      Novae, etc

      Mark sent:

         Date: Wed, 05 Apr 2006 02:25:09 -0000
         From: "mahtezcatpoc" <mahtezcatpoc@...>
      Subject: Re: Novae

      > > Just out of curiosity: do you know how bright these
      > > novae got?
       
      Diana wrotr:
      > > Sorry, I don't, but I'll bet if you Google them
      > > you'll find out...
      > > that would be Nova Puppis 1942

      ...also known as CP Puppis...

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP_Puppis

       and Nova Lacertae
      > > 1936.

      ...also known as CP Lacertae.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP_Lacertae

      It seems a good many novae have been put in the variable-star
      category by astronomers.

      CP Lacertae hit magnitude +2.1 in 1936, and CP Puppis hit magnitude
      +0.3 in 1942.

      Wow - that's pretty bright - especially CP Puppis. What does "CP"
      stand for - do you know?

      Here's a Wikipedia page on novae that includes a list of novae that
      attained seventh magnitude and up since 1891, more objects for my
      fixed-stars lists (probably the novae page, too, once I can get a
      handle on their astrological influence).

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nova

      And this is the Wikipedia supernova page.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supernova

      Thank you for these! I've copied both pages into my files - very
      useful!

      Love, Diana



      Website: http://pw1.netcom.com/~ye-stars/

    • Mark Andrew Holmes
      ... This is called the star s Argelander designation, after Friedrich Argelander, the Lithuanian-born German-Finnish astronomer who developed this naming
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 5, 2006
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        --- "Diana K. Rosenberg" <ye-stars@...>
        wrote:

        > Mark sent:
        >

        >
        > It seems a good many novae have been put in the
        > variable-star
        > category by astronomers.
        >
        > CP Lacertae hit magnitude +2.1 in 1936, and CP
        > Puppis hit magnitude
        > +0.3 in 1942.
        >
        > Wow - that's pretty bright - especially CP Puppis.
        > What does "CP"
        > stand for - do you know?

        This is called the star's Argelander designation,
        after Friedrich Argelander, the Lithuanian-born
        German-Finnish astronomer who developed this naming
        system for variable stars in the mid-19th-century. He
        gave letters of the Roman alphabet to variable stars,
        starting with R, and moving on to S, T, U, etc., and
        after Z the system goes on to RR, RS, RT, and so
        forth, until QZ is reached; the letter J isn't used.
        Past QZ astronomers start using alphanumeric
        designations, V plus a number which indicates the
        variable's order of discovery, e.g., V322 Orionis.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Variable_star


        >
        > Here's a Wikipedia page on novae that includes a
        > list of novae that
        > attained seventh magnitude and up since 1891, more
        > objects for my
        > fixed-stars lists (probably the novae page, too,
        > once I can get a
        > handle on their astrological influence).
        >
        > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nova
        >
        > And this is the Wikipedia supernova page.
        >
        > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supernova
        >
        > Thank you for these! I've copied both pages into my
        > files - very
        > useful!


        Good.


        Mark A. Holmes

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