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Re: [thefixedstars] Corona Australis

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  • Mark Andrew Holmes
    ... http://www.winshop.com.au/annew/mcorona_australis.htm According to Ptolemy, ... http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/4837988.stm Yes, his name was
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 3, 2006
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      --- "Diana K. Rosenberg" <ye-stars@...>
      wrote:

      > Mark sent:
      >
      > > *Alpha Coronae Australis
      >
      >
      http://www.winshop.com.au/annew/mcorona_australis.htm
      According to Ptolemy,
      > the bright stars in Corona Australis (Alpha, Beta,
      > Gamma, Delta) have an
      > influence like that of Saturn and Mercury. In early
      > China, this was the
      > figure of a Tortoise, associated with inundations.
      >
      > Wasn't there something on the news a couple of days
      > ago about a very aged
      > tortoise who had died (something like
      > 250 years old)

      http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/4837988.stm

      Yes, his name was Adwaita; he was an Aldabra tortoise
      (a species of giant tortoise native to the
      Seychelles), one of the star attractions at the
      Alipore Zoological Garden in Calcutta, and he was once
      the pet of an 18th-century British general named
      Robert Clive. Adwaita had been at the zoo since 1875
      and is believed to have been born in 1750, which would
      make him 256 when he died. He was given to Clive in
      1767 along with three other Aldabra tortoises who have
      all since died; Clive died in 1774. They're going to
      carbon-date Adwaita's carcass to find out just how old
      he is; there have been claims that he was born in
      1705.

      BTW: The oldest living animal whose age is
      *documented* is Harriet, a Galapagos tortoise taken
      from Isla Santa Cruz in the Galapagos Islands by
      Charles Darwin himself in 1835. Her age was determined
      through examination; she was a dinner-plate-sized
      five-year-old when Darwin picked her up. She's now a
      love-seat-sized 176-year-old. She was originally named
      Harry, but she was renamed after being discovered to
      be female in 1960. Harriet now lives at the Australia
      Zoo in Beerwah, Queensland, Australia (north of
      Brisbane).

      http://www.whatsonwhen.com/events/~14769.jml

      Mark A. Holmes

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