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Re: [thefixedstars] Novae

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  • Mark Andrew Holmes
    ... Wow. Just out of curiosity: do you know how bright these novae got? Mark A. Holmes __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 3, 2006
      --- "Diana K. Rosenberg" <ye-stars@...>
      wrote:

      > Is that your text, Mark?
      >
      > You sent:
      >
      > The supernova of 1054 in Taurus whose remnant is now
      > the Crab Nebula
      > occurred in the same year as the Great Schism
      > between
      > the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Christian
      > churches
      >
      > What blew me away here was that the Great Schism
      > occurred just 12 days after
      > the Supernova appeared!
      >
      > in my book, I have:
      >
      > a Papal Legate laid a Bull of Excommunication on the
      > altar of
      > Constantinople's Hagia Sophia, anathematizing the
      > Patriarch of the Eastern
      > Church; the Patriarch responded with an
      > excommunication of his own, thus
      > beginning the "Great Schism" between Eastern
      > (Byzantine) and Roman
      > Christianity, still unhealed after more than 900
      > years (this occurred just
      > 12 days after the appearance of the Great Supernova
      > of 1054, whose remnant
      > is now the Crab Nebula, in the horn of the Bull).
      >
      > Here are 2 more for the collection:
      >
      > Nova Lacertae 1936 in crown of Cepheus 11AR12 58 52
      > 55 37 22 16
      > ----- -----
      > appeared on Cepheus/Lacerta border June 18, 1936;
      > "officially" in Lacerta,
      > but actually in the original
      > crown of Cepheus, the King. King Edward VIII of
      > England abdicated less than
      > 6 months later
      >
      > Nova Puppis 1942 (18507), sighted in Argo's Stern on
      > the night of Nov 8,
      > 1942, the exact date of
      > WWII's "Operation Torch," the 650-ship Allied
      > amphibious invasion of North
      > Africa!


      Wow.

      Just out of curiosity: do you know how bright these
      novae got?

      Mark A. Holmes

      __________________________________________________
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    • Diana K. Rosenberg
      Mark wrote: Just out of curiosity: do you know how bright these novae got? Sorry, I don t, but I ll bet if you Google them you ll find out... that would be
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 4, 2006
        Novae

        Mark wrote:

        Just out of curiosity: do you know how bright these
        novae got?

        Sorry, I don't, but I'll bet if you Google them you'll find out...
        that would be Nova Puppis 1942 and Nova Lacertae 1936.

        Let me know if you find out

        Love, Diana

        Website: http://pw1.netcom.com/~ye-stars/

      • Mark Andrew Holmes
        ... (you wrote) ... I can look; I just thought you knew. ... I will. Mark A. Holmes __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 4, 2006
          --- "Diana K. Rosenberg" <ye-stars@...>
          wrote:

          > Mark wrote:
          >
          > Just out of curiosity: do you know how bright these
          > novae got?

          (you wrote)

          >
          > Sorry, I don't, but I'll bet if you Google them
          > you'll find out...
          > that would be Nova Puppis 1942 and Nova Lacertae
          > 1936.

          I can look; I just thought you knew.


          >
          > Let me know if you find out


          I will.

          Mark A. Holmes

          __________________________________________________
          Do You Yahoo!?
          Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
          http://mail.yahoo.com
        • mahtezcatpoc
          ... ...also known as CP Puppis... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP_Puppis and Nova Lacertae ... ...also known as CP Lacertae.
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 4, 2006
            --- In thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com, Mark Andrew Holmes
            <mahtezcatpoc@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > --- "Diana K. Rosenberg" <ye-stars@...>
            > wrote:
            >
            > > Mark wrote:
            > >
            > > Just out of curiosity: do you know how bright these
            > > novae got?
            >
            > (you wrote)
            >
            > >
            > > Sorry, I don't, but I'll bet if you Google them
            > > you'll find out...
            > > that would be Nova Puppis 1942

            ...also known as CP Puppis...

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP_Puppis

            and Nova Lacertae
            > > 1936.

            ...also known as CP Lacertae.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP_Lacertae

            It seems a good many novae have been put in the variable-star
            category by astronomers.

            > >
            > > Let me know if you find out
            >
            >
            > I will.


            CP Lacertae hit magnitude +2.1 in 1936, and CP Puppis hit magnitude
            +0.3 in 1942.

            Here's a Wikipedia page on novae that includes a list of novae that
            attained seventh magnitude and up since 1891, more objects for my
            fixed-stars lists (probably the novae page, too, once I can get a
            handle on their astrological influence).

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nova

            And this is the Wikipedia supernova page.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supernova


            Mark A. Holmes
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