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Novae

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  • Diana K. Rosenberg
    Is that your text, Mark? You sent: The supernova of 1054 in Taurus whose remnant is now the Crab Nebula occurred in the same year as the Great Schism between
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 3, 2006
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      Novae

      Is that your text, Mark?

      You sent:

      The supernova of 1054 in Taurus whose remnant is now the Crab Nebula occurred in the same year as the Great Schism between

       the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Christian churches

      What blew me away here was that the Great Schism occurred just 12 days after the Supernova appeared!

      in my book, I have:

      a Papal Legate laid a Bull of Excommunication on the altar of Constantinople’s Hagia Sophia, anathematizing the Patriarch of the Eastern Church; the Patriarch responded with an excommunication of his own, thus beginning the “Great Schism” between Eastern (Byzantine) and Roman Christianity, still unhealed after more than 900 years (this occurred just 12 days after the appearance of the Great Supernova of 1054, whose remnant is now the Crab Nebula, in the horn of the Bull).

      Here are 2 more for the collection:

      Nova Lacertae 1936  in crown of Cepheus 11AR12  58 52   55 37   22 16   -----   -----
       appeared on Cepheus/Lacerta border June 18, 1936; “officially” in Lacerta, but actually in the original
       crown of Cepheus, the King. King Edward VIII of England abdicated less than 6 months later

      Nova Puppis 1942 (18507), sighted in Argo’s Stern on the night of Nov 8, 1942, the exact date of
      WWII’s "Operation Torch," the 650-ship Allied amphibious invasion of North Africa!

      Love, Diana


      Website: http://pw1.netcom.com/~ye-stars/

    • Mark Andrew Holmes
      ... Wow. Just out of curiosity: do you know how bright these novae got? Mark A. Holmes __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 3, 2006
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        --- "Diana K. Rosenberg" <ye-stars@...>
        wrote:

        > Is that your text, Mark?
        >
        > You sent:
        >
        > The supernova of 1054 in Taurus whose remnant is now
        > the Crab Nebula
        > occurred in the same year as the Great Schism
        > between
        > the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Christian
        > churches
        >
        > What blew me away here was that the Great Schism
        > occurred just 12 days after
        > the Supernova appeared!
        >
        > in my book, I have:
        >
        > a Papal Legate laid a Bull of Excommunication on the
        > altar of
        > Constantinople's Hagia Sophia, anathematizing the
        > Patriarch of the Eastern
        > Church; the Patriarch responded with an
        > excommunication of his own, thus
        > beginning the "Great Schism" between Eastern
        > (Byzantine) and Roman
        > Christianity, still unhealed after more than 900
        > years (this occurred just
        > 12 days after the appearance of the Great Supernova
        > of 1054, whose remnant
        > is now the Crab Nebula, in the horn of the Bull).
        >
        > Here are 2 more for the collection:
        >
        > Nova Lacertae 1936 in crown of Cepheus 11AR12 58 52
        > 55 37 22 16
        > ----- -----
        > appeared on Cepheus/Lacerta border June 18, 1936;
        > "officially" in Lacerta,
        > but actually in the original
        > crown of Cepheus, the King. King Edward VIII of
        > England abdicated less than
        > 6 months later
        >
        > Nova Puppis 1942 (18507), sighted in Argo's Stern on
        > the night of Nov 8,
        > 1942, the exact date of
        > WWII's "Operation Torch," the 650-ship Allied
        > amphibious invasion of North
        > Africa!


        Wow.

        Just out of curiosity: do you know how bright these
        novae got?

        Mark A. Holmes

        __________________________________________________
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        Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
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      • Diana K. Rosenberg
        Mark wrote: Just out of curiosity: do you know how bright these novae got? Sorry, I don t, but I ll bet if you Google them you ll find out... that would be
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 4, 2006
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          Novae

          Mark wrote:

          Just out of curiosity: do you know how bright these
          novae got?

          Sorry, I don't, but I'll bet if you Google them you'll find out...
          that would be Nova Puppis 1942 and Nova Lacertae 1936.

          Let me know if you find out

          Love, Diana

          Website: http://pw1.netcom.com/~ye-stars/

        • Mark Andrew Holmes
          ... (you wrote) ... I can look; I just thought you knew. ... I will. Mark A. Holmes __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 4, 2006
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            --- "Diana K. Rosenberg" <ye-stars@...>
            wrote:

            > Mark wrote:
            >
            > Just out of curiosity: do you know how bright these
            > novae got?

            (you wrote)

            >
            > Sorry, I don't, but I'll bet if you Google them
            > you'll find out...
            > that would be Nova Puppis 1942 and Nova Lacertae
            > 1936.

            I can look; I just thought you knew.


            >
            > Let me know if you find out


            I will.

            Mark A. Holmes

            __________________________________________________
            Do You Yahoo!?
            Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
            http://mail.yahoo.com
          • mahtezcatpoc
            ... ...also known as CP Puppis... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP_Puppis and Nova Lacertae ... ...also known as CP Lacertae.
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 4, 2006
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              --- In thefixedstars@yahoogroups.com, Mark Andrew Holmes
              <mahtezcatpoc@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              > --- "Diana K. Rosenberg" <ye-stars@...>
              > wrote:
              >
              > > Mark wrote:
              > >
              > > Just out of curiosity: do you know how bright these
              > > novae got?
              >
              > (you wrote)
              >
              > >
              > > Sorry, I don't, but I'll bet if you Google them
              > > you'll find out...
              > > that would be Nova Puppis 1942

              ...also known as CP Puppis...

              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP_Puppis

              and Nova Lacertae
              > > 1936.

              ...also known as CP Lacertae.

              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP_Lacertae

              It seems a good many novae have been put in the variable-star
              category by astronomers.

              > >
              > > Let me know if you find out
              >
              >
              > I will.


              CP Lacertae hit magnitude +2.1 in 1936, and CP Puppis hit magnitude
              +0.3 in 1942.

              Here's a Wikipedia page on novae that includes a list of novae that
              attained seventh magnitude and up since 1891, more objects for my
              fixed-stars lists (probably the novae page, too, once I can get a
              handle on their astrological influence).

              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nova

              And this is the Wikipedia supernova page.

              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supernova


              Mark A. Holmes
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