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Replacement originals for the Turn On album

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  • Sean Bonniwell
    Artie Fisk wrote: I got The Ultimate Turn On , and I must say the tunes all have a heck of a lot more whoomp than they do in stereo, and of course, the
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 29, 2009
      Artie Fisk wrote:
       
      I got 'The Ultimate Turn On', and I must say the tunes all have a heck of a lot more "whoomp" than they do in stereo, and of course, the mixes are subtly different, almost always to beneficial effect.
       
      All in all, this package is able to FINALLY do justice to what I've always thought of as the best, angriest, fuzziest, gnarliest, most sophisticated "garage/punk" of the '60s or any era.
       
      Here's my question.
      What, exactly, would the track listing of the Turn On LP have been in 1966 IF you'd had your druthers?
       
      From what you've said, I know that the covers wouldn't have been on there, with the possible exceptions of "Hey Joe" and perhaps "Cherry Cherry."
      If we assume that you would keep "Talk Talk," "Masculine Intuition," "Come On In," "The People In Me," "Wrong," "Trouble," and "Some Other Drum," that only adds up to 9 songs.
      Assuming that American LPs of the time had, on average, somewhere between 11 and 14 songs on them (the then-released version of Turn On had 12, and the BMM album had, as I recall, 14), what other tracks would you have put on there?
       
       
      Artie --
      If I were to replace ALL the non-originals, my preferences would be: "Point Of No Return", "The Eagle Never Hunts The Fly" (the extended version), "Discrepancy", "Double Yellow Line," and "Dark White".
       
      The track listing would be:
       
      "Trouble"
      "Talk Talk"
      "Come On In'
      "The People In Me"
      "Masculine Intuition"
      "Some Other Drum"
      "Wrong"
      "Point Of No Return"
      "Discrepancy"
      "Double Yellow Line"
      "Dark White"
      "The Eagle Never Hunts The Fly"
       
       Alternates might be, "I've Loved You" (the fuzz guitar version), "No Girl Gonna Cry", "The Trap" and "You'll Love Me Again".
       
      With the possible exception of "Discrepancy", all MM tracks were written, arranged and recorded to be heard in Mono; stereo weakens the coagulated force of the band and thus, the intended impact.  
       
      With the exception of the Sundazed releases, all re-issues prior to 'The Ultimate' suffer from heavy-handed incompetence and mindless exploitation (this is especially true of 'The Very Best Of' CD, which couldn't be worse for its inclusion of discarded out-takes  -- in stereo no less, marketed with shoddy graphics and blatant fraudulence. This is made painfully obvious by 'The Ultimate' which, being faithful to the MM's emphatic creative intentions, makes it just that.   
       
      And for the record (in both terms), the sonic quality of the BMM Warners' album was severly compromised by squeezing 14 tracks on vinyl, a mistake made by yours truely. No one informed me of the needle's inability to 'sit' deeply and squarely into the grooves; listening to the vinyl Warners' album is not unlike making love to a beautiful woman who has no genitalia.
       
      With Blessings by His grace to all,
      sb
      --------------
       
      S,
       
      This isn't news to fans or to those of us of a certain age, but it may be to some of the younger set who have just discovered the MM  ...
       
      "The Gloved One"
       
       
      J
      --------------
       
      Hello Sean,

      Is your "Close" album available on Cd?  I have a worn out vinyl copy that I copied to CDR.
      Just wanted to say this is a fantastic album, and if it's not 
      available, it should be.

      Leonard
       
      -------------------
      Hello Leonard --
       
      I'm pleased to say the 'Close' album is available.
       
      It's been digitally remastered and is sonically pristine -- actually sounding better than the original (having been stripped of analog hiss, pops and crackles generic to vinyl).
      Go to
      http://www.bonniwellmusicmachine.com/blog/index.php
      for details, and thank you for your gracious support and inspiring compliments.
      In God we trust,
      sb
       
       
    • artie.fisk
      Sean... wow. I wouldn t have expected Dark White to be on there. Was it written already by the time of the first LP? Might have made a nice side two closer
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 30, 2009
        Sean...

        wow.

        I wouldn't have expected Dark White to be on there. Was it written already by the time of the first LP? Might have made a nice side two closer if you closed side one with "Hey Joe," or if you had your way and removed ALL the covers, maybe "Some Other Drum."

        Nice. I'll make a playlist this way and try it out in the car.

        And as for this comment:

        "listening to the vinyl Warners' album is not unlike making love to a beautiful woman who has no genitalia."

        I agree with you in terms of pure sound quality. For me, getting an original copy of that record was like finding the lost city of gold. I was 19 or so, in the mid-80s, and had the Line Records white vinyl reissue of "Turn On," the Rhino "Best Of," the flexi from Splendid magazine, and singles of "Talk Talk"/ "Come On In" and
        "People In Me"/"Masculine Intuition" I went to a weird little record store in New Brunswick, NJ, called All Ears Records, who makes appointments with you (!) I'd called him looking for MM stuff, and when I got there, he had out for me to peruse, stereo and mono original "Turn On" LPs, the Warners BMM record, a copy of "Close," and a bunch of the more common singles (all OS issues; no Warners or Bell).

        With limited funds, and knowing that I might not get back to this store anytime soon, I sprung for "Close" and the Warner's BMM LP. I can remember devouring the cover art and liner notes on the way home. I can still remember the laugh my buddy and I had over the "That 'Talk Talk' gang is back with a BANG!" in giant, Yellow-Submarine-esque letters on the back cover.

        When we got home, we didn't care about sound quality. We were blown away by the songs we'd never heard. We loved the interplay of fuzz and organ on "Bottom Of The Soul," and the crazy overlay of organ and horns on "Somethin' Hurtin' On Me," (a very Brian Wilson touch, oddly enough, with the organ dry and the horns, doubling that part, reverbed -- nice texture there), and especially the weird tension between the bubblegum pop of most of "Me, Myself & I" and the sinister fuzz and percussion breakdown in the middle. And more, of course.

        For me, that day, the beautiful woman most certainly did have genitalia, and if I may extend your metaphor to perhaps the breaking point, it was a beautiful woman who'd been playing hard to get for a veeeery long time.

        Thanks for your well-considered thoughts on this matter. Any word from the other MM members on this topic?

        And hey, all you other DoubleYellowLine members-- what do YOU all think? What would YOUR Turn On playlists look like?

        --Artie
      • hywachee@aol.com
        Hi Artie, ?Thanks for painting such a vivid pitcure in my mind of your voyage to find that music at the record store, I have also traveled and searched out MM
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 30, 2009
          Hi Artie,
           Thanks for painting such a vivid pitcure in my mind of your voyage to find that music at the record store, I have also traveled and searched out MM records. The Music Machine is by far the best band to come out of that era. Sean's vocals and  the melodic waves of  music from that band have always taken me from this earth bound existence to the upper reaches of pleasure..
          Best Wishes, Sean Flynn
           Boston Mass. (love that dirty water)


          -----Original Message-----
          From: artie.fisk <artie.fisk@...>
          To: thedoubleyellowline@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thu, Jul 30, 2009 9:41 am
          Subject: [The Double Yellow Line] Re: Replacement originals for the Turn On album

          Sean...
          
          wow.
          
          I wouldn't have expected Dark White to be on there.  Was it written already by 
          the time of the first LP?  Might have made a nice side two closer if you closed 
          side one with "Hey Joe," or if you had your way and removed ALL the covers, 
          maybe "Some Other Drum."  
          
          Nice. I'll make a playlist this way and try it out in the car.
          
          And as for this comment:
          
          "listening to the vinyl Warners' album is not unlike making love to a beautiful 
          woman who has no genitalia."
          
          I agree with you in terms of pure sound quality.  For me, getting an original 
          copy of that record was like finding the lost city of gold. I was 19 or so, in 
          the mid-80s, and had the Line Records white vinyl reissue of "Turn On," the 
          Rhino "Best Of," the flexi from Splendid magazine, and singles of "Talk Talk"/ 
          "Come On In" and 
          "People In Me"/"Masculine Intuition" I went to a weird little record store in 
          New Brunswick, NJ, called All Ears Records, who makes appointments with you (!) 
          I'd called him looking for MM stuff, and when I got there, he had out for me to 
          peruse, stereo and mono original "Turn On" LPs, the Warners BMM record, a copy 
          of "Close," and a bunch of the more common singles (all OS issues; no Warners or 
          Bell).
          
          With limited funds, and knowing that I might not get back to this store anytime 
          soon, I sprung for "Close" and the Warner's BMM LP.  I can remember devouring 
          the cover art and liner notes on the way home.  I can still remember the laugh 
          my buddy and I had over the "That 'Talk Talk' gang is back with a BANG!" in 
          giant, Yellow-Submarine-esque letters on the back cover. 
          
          When we got home, we didn't care about sound quality.  We were blown away by the 
          songs we'd never heard.  We loved the interplay of fuzz and organ on "Bottom Of 
          The Soul," and the crazy overlay of organ and horns on "Somethin' Hurtin' On 
          Me," (a very Brian Wilson touch, oddly enough, with the organ dry and the horns, 
          doubling that part, reverbed -- nice texture there), and especially the weird 
          tension between the bubblegum pop of most of "Me, Myself & I" and the sinister 
          fuzz and percussion breakdown in the middle. And more, of course. 
          
          For me, that day, the beautiful woman most certainly did have genitalia, and if 
          I may extend your metaphor to perhaps the breaking point, it was a beautiful 
          woman who'd been playing hard to get for a veeeery long time.  
          
          Thanks for your well-considered thoughts on this matter.  Any word from the 
          other MM members on this topic?
          
          And hey, all you other DoubleYellowLine members-- what do YOU all think? What 
          would YOUR Turn On playlists look like?
          
          --Artie  
          
          
          
          
          
          ------------------------------------
          
          http://www.myspace.com/bonniwellmusicmachine
          http://www.bonniwellmusicmachine.com
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        • hywachee@aol.com
          Hi Artie, ?Thanks for painting such a vivid pitcure in my mind of your voyage to find that music at the record store, I have also traveled and searched out MM
          Message 4 of 9 , Jul 30, 2009
            Hi Artie,
             Thanks for painting such a vivid pitcure in my mind of your voyage to find that music at the record store, I have also traveled and searched out MM records. The Music Machine is by far the best band to come out of that era. Sean's vocals and  the melodic waves of  music from that band have always taken me from this earth bound existence to the upper reaches of pleasure..
            Best Wishes, Sean Flynn
             Boston Mass. (love that dirty water)


            -----Original Message-----
            From: artie.fisk <artie.fisk@...>
            To: thedoubleyellowline@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thu, Jul 30, 2009 9:41 am
            Subject: [The Double Yellow Line] Re: Replacement originals for the Turn On album

            Sean...
            
            wow.
            
            I wouldn't have expected Dark White to be on there.  Was it written already by 
            the time of the first LP?  Might have made a nice side two closer if you closed 
            side one with "Hey Joe," or if you had your way and removed ALL the covers, 
            maybe "Some Other Drum."  
            
            Nice. I'll make a playlist this way and try it out in the car.
            
            And as for this comment:
            
            "listening to the vinyl Warners' album is not unlike making love to a beautiful 
            woman who has no genitalia."
            
            I agree with you in terms of pure sound quality.  For me, getting an original 
            copy of that record was like finding the lost city of gold. I was 19 or so, in 
            the mid-80s, and had the Line Records white vinyl reissue of "Turn On," the 
            Rhino "Best Of," the flexi from Splendid magazine, and singles of "Talk Talk"/ 
            "Come On In" and 
            "People In Me"/"Masculine Intuition" I went to a weird little record store in 
            New Brunswick, NJ, called All Ears Records, who makes appointments with you (!) 
            I'd called him looking for MM stuff, and when I got there, he had out for me to 
            peruse, stereo and mono original "Turn On" LPs, the Warners BMM record, a copy 
            of "Close," and a bunch of the more common singles (all OS issues; no Warners or 
            Bell).
            
            With limited funds, and knowing that I might not get back to this store anytime 
            soon, I sprung for "Close" and the Warner's BMM LP.  I can remember devouring 
            the cover art and liner notes on the way home.  I can still remember the laugh 
            my buddy and I had over the "That 'Talk Talk' gang is back with a BANG!" in 
            giant, Yellow-Submarine-esque letters on the back cover. 
            
            When we got home, we didn't care about sound quality.  We were blown away by the 
            songs we'd never heard.  We loved the interplay of fuzz and organ on "Bottom Of 
            The Soul," and the crazy overlay of organ and horns on "Somethin' Hurtin' On 
            Me," (a very Brian Wilson touch, oddly enough, with the organ dry and the horns, 
            doubling that part, reverbed -- nice texture there), and especially the weird 
            tension between the bubblegum pop of most of "Me, Myself & I" and the sinister 
            fuzz and percussion breakdown in the middle. And more, of course. 
            
            For me, that day, the beautiful woman most certainly did have genitalia, and if 
            I may extend your metaphor to perhaps the breaking point, it was a beautiful 
            woman who'd been playing hard to get for a veeeery long time.  
            
            Thanks for your well-considered thoughts on this matter.  Any word from the 
            other MM members on this topic?
            
            And hey, all you other DoubleYellowLine members-- what do YOU all think? What 
            would YOUR Turn On playlists look like?
            
            --Artie  
            
            
            
            
            
            ------------------------------------
            
            http://www.myspace.com/bonniwellmusicmachine
            http://www.bonniwellmusicmachine.com
            Yahoo! Groups Links
            
            <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/thedoubleyellowline/
            
            <*> Your email settings:
                Individual Email | Traditional
            
            <*> To change settings online go to:
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/thedoubleyellowline/join
                (Yahoo! ID required)
            
            <*> To change settings via email:
                mailto:thedoubleyellowline-digest@yahoogroups.com 
                mailto:thedoubleyellowline-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
            
            <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                thedoubleyellowline-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            
            <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
                http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            
            
          • Ron Edgar
            Hi there this is Ron, Let me see... The Turn On album. I would include Talk me Down and I ve Loved You for sure. I would have released Talk Me Down as
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 2, 2009

              Hi there this is Ron,  Let me see... The Turn On album.  I would include "Talk me Down" and "I've Loved You" for sure. I would have released "Talk Me Down" as the follow up track To "Talk Talk"   A perfect sequel.  Short, powerful, and driving.  "I've Loved you" was beautifully written and arranged by the guys. It was a stand out to me....."Absolutely Positively"  Like "Hey Joe"  (a show stopper) the girls went crazy over it. but you,re talkin' about originals so....That's what I like.
                                                                         Ron Edgar




















              To: thedoubleyellowline@yahoogroups.com
              From: artie.fisk@...
              Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2009 13:41:14 +0000
              Subject: [The Double Yellow Line] Re: Replacement originals for the Turn On album

               
              Sean...

              wow.

              I wouldn't have expected Dark White to be on there. Was it written already by the time of the first LP? Might have made a nice side two closer if you closed side one with "Hey Joe," or if you had your way and removed ALL the covers, maybe "Some Other Drum."

              Nice. I'll make a playlist this way and try it out in the car.

              And as for this comment:

              "listening to the vinyl Warners' album is not unlike making love to a beautiful woman who has no genitalia."

              I agree with you in terms of pure sound quality. For me, getting an original copy of that record was like finding the lost city of gold. I was 19 or so, in the mid-80s, and had the Line Records white vinyl reissue of "Turn On," the Rhino "Best Of," the flexi from Splendid magazine, and singles of "Talk Talk"/ "Come On In" and
              "People In Me"/"Masculine Intuition" I went to a weird little record store in New Brunswick, NJ, called All Ears Records, who makes appointments with you (!) I'd called him looking for MM stuff, and when I got there, he had out for me to peruse, stereo and mono original "Turn On" LPs, the Warners BMM record, a copy of "Close," and a bunch of the more common singles (all OS issues; no Warners or Bell).

              With limited funds, and knowing that I might not get back to this store anytime soon, I sprung for "Close" and the Warner's BMM LP. I can remember devouring the cover art and liner notes on the way home. I can still remember the laugh my buddy and I had over the "That 'Talk Talk' gang is back with a BANG!" in giant, Yellow-Submarine- esque letters on the back cover.

              When we got home, we didn't care about sound quality. We were blown away by the songs we'd never heard. We loved the interplay of fuzz and organ on "Bottom Of The Soul," and the crazy overlay of organ and horns on "Somethin' Hurtin' On Me," (a very Brian Wilson touch, oddly enough, with the organ dry and the horns, doubling that part, reverbed -- nice texture there), and especially the weird tension between the bubblegum pop of most of "Me, Myself & I" and the sinister fuzz and percussion breakdown in the middle. And more, of course.

              For me, that day, the beautiful woman most certainly did have genitalia, and if I may extend your metaphor to perhaps the breaking point, it was a beautiful woman who'd been playing hard to get for a veeeery long time.

              Thanks for your well-considered thoughts on this matter. Any word from the other MM members on this topic?

              And hey, all you other DoubleYellowLine members-- what do YOU all think? What would YOUR Turn On playlists look like?

              --Artie




              Windows Live™: Keep your life in sync. Check it out.
            • FIRSTARROWHEAD@AOL.COM
              Ron I like those too also Cherry Cherry It blew me away. Mickey In a message dated 8/2/2009 5:26:19 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, rdedgar@hotmail.com writes: Hi
              Message 6 of 9 , Aug 2, 2009
                Ron I like those too also Cherry Cherry It blew me away.
                Mickey
                 
                In a message dated 8/2/2009 5:26:19 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, rdedgar@... writes:
                 


                Hi there this is Ron,  Let me see... The Turn On album.  I would include "Talk me Down" and "I've Loved You" for sure. I would have released "Talk Me Down" as the follow up track To "Talk Talk"   A perfect sequel.  Short, powerful, and driving.  "I've Loved you" was beautifully written and arranged by the guys. It was a stand out to me....."Absolutely Positively"  Like "Hey Joe"  (a show stopper) the girls went crazy over it. but you,re talkin' about originals so....That's what I like.
                                                                           Ron Edgar




















                To: thedoubleyellowline @yahoogroups. com
                From: artie.fisk@yahoo. com
                Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2009 13:41:14 +0000
                Subject: [The Double Yellow Line] Re: Replacement originals for the Turn On album

                 
                Sean...

                wow.

                I wouldn't have expected Dark White to be on there. Was it written already by the time of the first LP? Might have made a nice side two closer if you closed side one with "Hey Joe," or if you had your way and removed ALL the covers, maybe "Some Other Drum."

                Nice. I'll make a playlist this way and try it out in the car.

                And as for this comment:

                "listening to the vinyl Warners' album is not unlike making love to a beautiful woman who has no genitalia."

                I agree with you in terms of pure sound quality. For me, getting an original copy of that record was like finding the lost city of gold. I was 19 or so, in the mid-80s, and had the Line Records white vinyl reissue of "Turn On," the Rhino "Best Of," the flexi from Splendid magazine, and singles of "Talk Talk"/ "Come On In" and
                "People In Me"/"Masculine Intuition" I went to a weird little record store in New Brunswick, NJ, called All Ears Records, who makes appointments with you (!) I'd called him looking for MM stuff, and when I got there, he had out for me to peruse, stereo and mono original "Turn On" LPs, the Warners BMM record, a copy of "Close," and a bunch of the more common singles (all OS issues; no Warners or Bell).

                With limited funds, and knowing that I might not get back to this store anytime soon, I sprung for "Close" and the Warner's BMM LP. I can remember devouring the cover art and liner notes on the way home. I can still remember the laugh my buddy and I had over the "That 'Talk Talk' gang is back with a BANG!" in giant, Yellow-Submarine- esque letters on the back cover.

                When we got home, we didn't care about sound quality. We were blown away by the songs we'd never heard. We loved the interplay of fuzz and organ on "Bottom Of The Soul," and the crazy overlay of organ and horns on "Somethin' Hurtin' On Me," (a very Brian Wilson touch, oddly enough, with the organ dry and the horns, doubling that part, reverbed -- nice texture there), and especially the weird tension between the bubblegum pop of most of "Me, Myself & I" and the sinister fuzz and percussion breakdown in the middle. And more, of course.

                For me, that day, the beautiful woman most certainly did have genitalia, and if I may extend your metaphor to perhaps the breaking point, it was a beautiful woman who'd been playing hard to get for a veeeery long time.

                Thanks for your well-considered thoughts on this matter. Any word from the other MM members on this topic?

                And hey, all you other DoubleYellowLine members-- what do YOU all think? What would YOUR Turn On playlists look like?

                --Artie




                Windows Live™: Keep your life in sync. Check it out.

              • artie.fisk
                Ron... As the man who was the driving (and I do mean DRIVING) force behind Talk Me Down, you re uniquely qualified to offer this assessment of it. Ever
                Message 7 of 9 , Aug 2, 2009
                  Ron...

                  As the man who was the driving (and I do mean DRIVING) force behind "Talk Me Down," you're uniquely qualified to offer this assessment of it. Ever since I found out that it was around before the 1st album, I've thought it belonged on there, too. Then again, I'm just a fan...

                  I must say, also, that your drumming on that tune (if possible) surpasses almost everything by anyone else from that era. Your playing was always top-notch on the MM stuff, but "Talk Me Down" is really YOUR track. UNBELIEVABLY tight, but still swinging, propulsive playing. Most of the other rock drummers of the era were either too sloppy or else they had no swing at all--couldn't swing while rocking. You always could, and always played tastefully, even when you were rocking people's pants off. The playing on
                  "Double Yellow Line," and too many others to mention. "Absolutely Positively" stands out, too. You, sir, are probably the most underrated sixties drummer, along with Hugh Grundy of the Zombies. They don't make 'em like you anymore, and they oughtta.

                  Thanks, Ron, for the response. I saw you and Sean play with the Fuzztones at Cavestomp 2001, and I have to say that the only thing that could have made it better than just seeing Sean play his songs was seeing him play them with you. Fine stuff.

                  --Artie

                  --- In thedoubleyellowline@yahoogroups.com, Ron Edgar <rdedgar@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Hi there this is Ron, Let me see... The Turn On album. I would include "Talk me Down" and "I've Loved You" for sure. I would have released "Talk Me Down" as the follow up track To "Talk Talk" A perfect sequel. Short, powerful, and driving. "I've Loved you" was beautifully written and arranged by the guys. It was a stand out to me....."Absolutely Positively" Like "Hey Joe" (a show stopper) the girls went crazy over it. but you,re talkin' about originals so....That's what I like.
                  > Ron Edgar
                  >
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                  > To: thedoubleyellowline@yahoogroups.com
                  > From: artie.fisk@...
                  > Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2009 13:41:14 +0000
                  > Subject: [The Double Yellow Line] Re: Replacement originals for the Turn On album
                  >
                  >
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                  > Sean...
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > wow.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > I wouldn't have expected Dark White to be on there. Was it written already by the time of the first LP? Might have made a nice side two closer if you closed side one with "Hey Joe," or if you had your way and removed ALL the covers, maybe "Some Other Drum."
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Nice. I'll make a playlist this way and try it out in the car.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > And as for this comment:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > "listening to the vinyl Warners' album is not unlike making love to a beautiful woman who has no genitalia."
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > I agree with you in terms of pure sound quality. For me, getting an original copy of that record was like finding the lost city of gold. I was 19 or so, in the mid-80s, and had the Line Records white vinyl reissue of "Turn On," the Rhino "Best Of," the flexi from Splendid magazine, and singles of "Talk Talk"/ "Come On In" and
                  >
                  > "People In Me"/"Masculine Intuition" I went to a weird little record store in New Brunswick, NJ, called All Ears Records, who makes appointments with you (!) I'd called him looking for MM stuff, and when I got there, he had out for me to peruse, stereo and mono original "Turn On" LPs, the Warners BMM record, a copy of "Close," and a bunch of the more common singles (all OS issues; no Warners or Bell).
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > With limited funds, and knowing that I might not get back to this store anytime soon, I sprung for "Close" and the Warner's BMM LP. I can remember devouring the cover art and liner notes on the way home. I can still remember the laugh my buddy and I had over the "That 'Talk Talk' gang is back with a BANG!" in giant, Yellow-Submarine-esque letters on the back cover.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > When we got home, we didn't care about sound quality. We were blown away by the songs we'd never heard. We loved the interplay of fuzz and organ on "Bottom Of The Soul," and the crazy overlay of organ and horns on "Somethin' Hurtin' On Me," (a very Brian Wilson touch, oddly enough, with the organ dry and the horns, doubling that part, reverbed -- nice texture there), and especially the weird tension between the bubblegum pop of most of "Me, Myself & I" and the sinister fuzz and percussion breakdown in the middle. And more, of course.
                  >
                  >
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                  > For me, that day, the beautiful woman most certainly did have genitalia, and if I may extend your metaphor to perhaps the breaking point, it was a beautiful woman who'd been playing hard to get for a veeeery long time.
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                  > Thanks for your well-considered thoughts on this matter. Any word from the other MM members on this topic?
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                  > And hey, all you other DoubleYellowLine members-- what do YOU all think? What would YOUR Turn On playlists look like?
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                  > --Artie
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                  > _________________________________________________________________
                  > Windows Live™: Keep your life in sync.
                  > http://windowslive.com/explore?ocid=PID23384::T:WLMTAGL:ON:WL:en-US:NF_BR_sync:082009
                  >
                • Jeanie G
                  Ron, Since I m not a musician, but merely a fan, I was glad to read that you thought Talk Me Down would have been the perfect sequel to Talk Talk . In my
                  Message 8 of 9 , Aug 9, 2009
                    Ron,

                    Since I'm not a musician, but merely a fan, I was glad to read that you thought "Talk Me Down" would have been the perfect sequel to "Talk Talk". In my opinion, you're absolutely right, and I'm glad to hear you think as I do. In fact, I've wondered why managers and/or record producers kept urging Sean to write 'another Talk Talk' when the perfect follow-up to it ("Talk Me Down") HAD been written.

                    Incidentally, while we're expressing our appreciation for your percussive talents, let me say I agree wholeheartedly with what Artie said. You are, without a doubt, one of the truly great artists in that arena.

                    I think "Soul Love" is another great example of your "driving force". As it is in so many of my favorite MM songs, it's as if you 'drill' the opening, and the rest of the Machine drives right though it, each member making his unique and memorable contribution to the song.

                    It was quite a collaboration, one I would have wished to have continued long after it did, but hearing how music industry executives and managers think and have been known to behave, I'm sometimes left wondering why they preferred to shoot themselves in both feet, when one foot would probably do. The stresses the music industry places on artists is legendary, and the results of 'executive decisions' can be devastasting to artists and fans alike.

                    I did want to ask though if I understood that the guys wrote "I've Loved You" or did you mean they arranged it? You're right; it was beautifully written, as are so many songs performed by both the MM and the BMM, but I just wondered if I understood correctly that they both wrote it and arranged it, or if you meant they arranged it. I always thought Sean wrote it, and just wondered if I understood your meaning.

                    Thanks for responding and giving us your thoughts relative to your preferences for the "Turn On" album. I agree with you!

                    Thanks, too, for what can only be described as your 'driving force'. It has provided me with decades of enjoyment.

                    Jeanie G
                  • nadarski1
                    Same here......their complete rearrangement of Cherry Cherry perfectly illustrates the band s inventiveness. (did Keith Olsen have a hand in this
                    Message 9 of 9 , Oct 2, 2009
                      Same here......their complete rearrangement of "Cherry Cherry" perfectly illustrates the band's inventiveness. (did Keith Olsen have a hand in this arrangement?) Regardless of whether or not the group would have chosen to include any covers if they'd had any say in the matter.......those interpretations of "Cherry" & "Hey Joe" are so unique.

                      Covers of "Taxman", "See See Rider" & "96 Tears" are pretty close to the originals - but they still rock. The first album would've definitely been more solid with "Double Yellow Line", "Eagle Never Hunts The Fly" or "No Girl Gonna Cry" in place of some of the cover tunes though.

                      BTW, "Cherry Cherry" has just been included on A Solitary Man, a CD of early Neil Diamond compositions from Ace:
                      http://www.acerecord.co.uk/content.php?page_id=59&release=8328

                      Good seeing Ron 'round these parts.

                      Matt


                      FIRSTARROWHEAD@... wrote:
                      >
                      > Ron I like those too also Cherry Cherry It blew me away.

                      > rdedgar@... writes:
                      >
                      > Hi there this is Ron, Let me see... The Turn On album. I would include
                      > "Talk me Down" and "I've Loved You" for sure. I would have released "Talk Me
                      > Down" as the follow up track To "Talk Talk" A perfect sequel. Short,
                      > powerful, and driving. "I've Loved you" was beautifully written and arranged
                      > by the guys. It was a stand out to me....."Absolutely Positively" Like
                      > "Hey Joe" (a show stopper) the girls went crazy over it. but you,re talkin'
                      > about originals so....That's what I like.

                      artie.fisk@... wrote:
                      >
                      > wow.
                      >
                      > I wouldn't have expected Dark White to be on there. Was it written already
                      > by the time of the first LP? Might have made a nice side two closer if you
                      > closed side one with "Hey Joe," or if you had your way and removed ALL the
                      > covers, maybe "Some Other Drum."
                      >
                      We were blown away
                      > by the songs we'd never heard. We loved the interplay of fuzz and organ on
                      > "Bottom Of The Soul," and the crazy overlay of organ and horns on "Somethin'
                      > Hurtin' On Me," (a very Brian Wilson touch, oddly enough, with the organ
                      > dry and the horns, doubling that part, reverbed -- nice texture there), and
                      > especially the weird tension between the bubblegum pop of most of "Me,
                      > Myself & I" and the sinister fuzz and percussion breakdown in the middle. And
                      > more, of course.
                      >
                      > And hey, all you other DoubleYellowLine members-- what do YOU all think?
                      > What would YOUR Turn On playlists look like?
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