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2927Re: interview with EYE and Yoshimi at the AV club

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  • alterego100usa
    May 29, 2008
      Glad for your posting. I'm not opposed to traveling for an event, but
      was just counting on the venues to advertise ticket availability more
      than 3 or 4 weeks prior to the event itself. Typically, in the music-
      rich Detroit area, even many small club gigs are advertised a couple
      of months earlier, and some bigger concerts are promoted 6 months or
      so earlier. And I'm still wondering why Boredoms couldn't ahve played
      Toronto, which is not all that far from here, and obviously a major
      city.-- In theboredoms@yahoogroups.com, "almurphy56" <almurphy56@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > we would all wish to see a bigger tour, but i think, given the
      > realities of touring today, boredoms have done a good job at
      bringing
      > in new fans, i mean, 77 last summer is a case in point. that was
      > certainly not existing boredoms fans. that was the shit to see! i
      came
      > up from virginia for it, and was totally blown away at the response
      to
      > the event. i guess we can thank this new world of internet hype and
      > blogs and shit for that. i see it as kind of bittersweet that
      boredoms
      > have been sucked into the blogosphere and all that, on the one hand
      > its great for expanding an audience, but of course there's all the
      > internet bullshit and short attention spans that i see all over
      > message boards (like the av club one i just read)that i hate to see
      my
      > favorite band getting sucked into. so i think it is the right way to
      > go to spread the word to your friends, other people, in person. the
      > internet these days is a lion's den, people's attention spans get
      > shorter by the minute.
      > also, boredoms have kind of had a zeppelin-esque approach to
      touring,
      > which, with fewer and more centralized shows in the states, has the
      > effect of making them more anticipated, memorable and talked-about
      > events. but yes, i agree, bad promotion squashes that approach
      pretty
      > quick.
      > anyway, pointless post. but it's definitely the best to bring people
      > to a show. i brought 2 of my friends to boadrum, and their heads
      were
      > blown 20 miles into the sky just like that.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In theboredoms@yahoogroups.com, alterego100usa <no_reply@>
      wrote:
      > >
      > > Yes, it has become prohibitive for bands to make the trip
      physically
      > > these days. I was seriously going to try for Philadelphia or DC,
      made
      > > several direct inquiries, but venues in both cities put tickets
      on
      > > sale extremely close to the event dates, and with my work, I had
      to
      > > know some absolutes, like concert dates and ticket availability,
      to
      > > be able to free up the time. Websites for both of those venues
      > > finally only listed the concerts a matter of a few weeks or so
      before
      > > the shows. Lodging in those cases would not have been a problem
      at
      > > all, as I have close family in that region. A smaller-scale
      analogy
      > > can be applied with the talented local musicians I know, many of
      whom
      > > play in a cycle of venues in front of generally identical small
      > > groups of fans. I do go to see them each on occasion (or when
      > > grouped, as is most often, in package shows) but they're also
      > > personal friends of mine, so I see them anyway and get their CDs
      > > free, etc. They often see the same faces when they play because
      it's
      > > so difficult for these musicians to get to play additional venues
      > > with owners who aren't corrupt or disinterested. Because of this
      (in
      > > part), their live audience does not really expand unless they can
      > > expand their territory of coverage. A group like Boredoms has an
      > > exceptional live performance approach that I believe would really
      > > expand their audience to very rewarding proportions IF others
      could
      > > be exposed to that art. That's where that investment toward
      > > touring/A&R/etc. can pay off quickly. I would've seen them this
      year
      > > if those venues had simply advertised tickets a reasonable length
      of
      > > time before the concerts, but that has nothing to do with
      Boredoms,
      > > just poor advertising. Even if they'd played Toronto, I would've
      been
      > > there; maybe that could be considered next time around?--- In
      > > theboredoms@yahoogroups.com, Joe Janecek <joejanecek@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > >but now they each limit their total USA appearances to just a
      few
      > > very
      > > > large (and sometimes regionally-clustered) cities, so neither
      are
      > > > really expanding their audiences by number anymore, just
      playing to
      > > the
      > > > existing fans. This is truly a shame.<
      > > >
      > > > Yes, the bigger problem is that ticket sales do not pay for the
      > > tours
      > > > here in the US for the international acts. Even WB, back in the
      day,
      > > > had trouble bringing a band over for a long run, as it was very
      > > > expensive. Now those days are certainly past, as labels won't
      spend
      > > the
      > > > cash unless they get a specific ROI- return on investment.
      > > >
      > > > When Boredoms were on the first part of Lollapalooza 94, the
      only
      > > way
      > > > the deal could be done was if Boredoms gave up their portion of
      the
      > > > Lolla t-shirt for which every band received money. That money
      helped
      > > > alongside the funds the label also chipped in. It was a once in
      a
      > > > lifetime opportunity for Boredoms to get that slot, so it was
      worth
      > > it.
      > > > Having Kurt Cobain and similar musicians as fans certainly
      helped
      > > too.
      > > > (BTW, part 2 of that Lolla tour featured Green Day in that
      opening
      > > > slot, just as the band was getting huge - but I digress.)
      > > >
      > > > Now, Boredoms are on Vice or Thrill Jockey (SR 9), labels that
      tend
      > > to
      > > > give little monetary tour support. Tour support just isn't in
      the
      > > > vocabulary of the indie labels, as it's rarely recouped against
      > > album
      > > > sales. Sadly, passion alone cannot move a band and tour bus
      from
      > > city
      > > > to city.
      > > >
      > > > Also, their booking agent, Windish Agency, has to be very
      selective
      > > > give the available tour window the band has available. They need
      > > > guaranteed money that makes sense for the tour at hand. Do I
      wish
      > > Bore
      > > > could do 30 dates? Sure. But the band probably has just a few
      weeks
      > > in
      > > > reality, and yes, regionally-clustered shows make travel more
      > > > affordable.
      > > >
      > > > When you mention "playing to the existing fans" - well, I
      disagree
      > > > there. It's your duty as a music fan, as a BORE fan, to pack up
      the
      > > > station wagon with your friends and make them experience
      Boredoms.
      > > Hey,
      > > > Bore made it to America for you, can't you drag some friends
      across
      > > > state lines to see them?
      > > >
      > > > The current music business environment has changed the game for
      > > > marginal bands and labels, and the future remains uncertain. At
      > > least
      > > > America is inexpensive for most bands compared to years past
      with
      > > the
      > > > current exchange rates. Maybe more will take up the offer to
      come
      > > the
      > > > the USA.
      > > >
      > > > cheers,
      > > > joe
      > > >
      > >
      >
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