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QUESTION: WHO WAS THE FIRST?

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  • amazona_gloriosa
    Not willing to abuse, but you guys seem to know so much, that I had to ask this question: Who was the first strong female character/ super-heroine of comics?
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 2, 2004
      Not willing to abuse, but you guys seem to know so much, that I
      had to ask this question:

      Who was the first strong female character/ super-heroine of comics?

      Was Sheena? Who?
    • jfglade
      ... Depends on what you mean by strong. Sheena first appeared in 1939 and she would fit my definition of a strong female character, since the man in her life
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 3, 2004
        --- In theallwinnerssquad@yahoogroups.com, amazona_gloriosa
        <no_reply@y...> wrote:
        > Not willing to abuse, but you guys seem to know so much, that I
        > had to ask this question:
        >
        > Who was the first strong female character/ super-heroine of comics?
        >
        > Was Sheena? Who?

        Depends on what you mean by "strong." Sheena first appeared in 1939
        and she would fit my definition of a strong female character, since
        the man in her life was in constant need of being rescued, taking
        much the same position as Lois Lane to Superman. Invisible Scarlet
        O'Neil was probably the first female character to have real powers,
        but her newspaper strip stories (which were later reprinted in
        comics) didn't fit the super-person mold. Fantomah might qualify, but
        she was such a bizarre character that I doubt she had much influence
        on anything, and I don't think she actually had much of a following,
        although she is becoming something of a cult figure now, thanks to
        the very peculiar nature of her stories (her head was apparently
        removable, for example). The Lady in Red was one of the first
        costumed "mystery women," but she wasn't much in terms of power and
        probably didn't have much of a following either. DC and Timely were
        both late in offering powerful females, and Wonder Woman would be the
        best remembered female "superheroine" of the golden age, probably
        beating out Mary Marvel by a nose. 1943 seems to be the year when
        women really came into their own in comics, but there were a variety
        of female characters around well before that. For my money, I say it
        was Sheena, since she had a long career and was one of the first
        comic book heroines to have her own title and her own television
        series; she was simply around earlier than almost any other female
        character and she obviously struck a resonate note with readers.
        Timely's (Marvel's) great use of female characters came just before
        they threw in the towel at the end of the golden age.

        My two cents,
        Jon
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