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SHANNA THE SHE-DEVIL is back!

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  • earthelemental99
    SHANNA THE SHE-DEVIL mini series by Frank Cho (Liberty Meadows) will be coming out late this year (just in time for Shanna s 30th anniversary, late 1972!) This
    Message 1 of 11 , Aug 2, 2002
      SHANNA THE SHE-DEVIL mini series by Frank Cho (Liberty Meadows) will
      be coming out late this year (just in time for Shanna's 30th
      anniversary, late 1972!)

      This will be the first MAX title I'll collect and read.

      And probably the last, given the rumors of Marvel's "Ulitmate"
      destruction of the true Marvel Universe in New X-Men #150 to wipe out
      ALL of the established Golden Age, Silver Age, and Modern Age
      continuity, only for the sake of promoting its lame-ass Ultimate line
      of nonsense.

      Getting back to the subject of Shanna O'Hara (Yes, her father was
      Irish!)-- In 1972, she was a veternary science doctor (specializing
      in the medical care of lions and leopards) and she was a physically
      powerful olympic tri-athlete (gold medalist in track & field,
      wrestling, martial arts, rock climbing, swimming & diving, etc.)
      She left both professions to pursue environmental efforts. Shanna was
      an avenging figure, clad only in a skimpy bikini cut from pelts taken
      from whatever animals she could not save. Shanna went super-heroing
      as a SHIELD-sanctioned wild lands specialist, working against bio-
      terrorists and spies. Often working solo, she even fought evil
      mutants and pagan death cults. She even once kept a huge Indian
      python big enough to swallow a man whole.(which it did!)

      Finally, Shanna married Ka-Zar (Lord Kevin Plunder) and they both
      ruled the Savage Land, until the hidden jungle's residents finally
      kicked them out (in 1998) when they were no longer needed. But strong
      characters like the Lord Plunder clan don't stay gone forever.

      Back in civilization, Shanna is now in focus, some good tales may
      abound--this giving Marvel one more chance to prove itself-- (at
      least one can hope!)

      Ka-Zar and Shanna may not seem different from their Golden Age jungle
      fighter predecessors-- E.R. Burrough's TARZAN and Fiction House's
      SHEENA. But they are jungle heroes that belong to Marvel. A lot of
      exciting history is behind them. They deserve some more good times,
      especially Shanna.

      So I say give Shanna "The She-Devil" Lady Plunder another shot,
      before Marvel pulls the plug on virtually everything...
    • sonofvulcan
      I never knew of course that Shanna was an homage/rip-off of Sheena of the Jungle way back when I first encountered the book in Marvel s ill- fated attempt to
      Message 2 of 11 , Aug 12, 2002
        I never knew of course that Shanna was an homage/rip-off of Sheena of
        the Jungle way back when I first encountered the book in Marvel's ill-
        fated attempt to attract female readers with this book, and others
        like The Cat and Night Nurse. Of the group Shanna was the strongest
        in terms of concept and talent. Ross Andru and Vince Colletta teamed
        up for some great artwork on these issues.

        Like Ka-Zar who was revived way, way back in the original X-Men by
        Lee and Kirby (just like the revivals of Subby in FF and Avengers,
        but not given nearly so much attention), Shanna was a try to
        reestablish the once fertile jungle epic which was all too common in
        the pulps. It was at exactly this same time that Marvel was trying
        its hand at Doc Savage (Ross Andru again as it turns out) and DC was
        giving Mike Kaluta his ticket to stardom with The Shadow. In the
        constant search for material, the old stuff which had proven so
        successful with Conan for Marvel and Tarzan for DC (under Joe
        Kubert's expert hand) was seen as a rich vein to mine. Sadly not all
        of it took off.

        Dean
      • earthelemental99
        I have a lot of fondness for Shanna, having collected every full appearance by her, except for the short run in Marvel Comics Presents. Here is the Shanna
        Message 3 of 11 , Aug 12, 2002
          I have a lot of fondness for Shanna, having collected every full
          appearance by her, except for the short run in Marvel Comics
          Presents.

          Here is the Shanna *must-have* list as it currently stands:

          SHANNNA THE SHE-DEVIL #1-5
          KA-ZAR, LORD OF THE HIDDEN JUNGLE #1-2
          DAREDEVIL #109-112
          SAVAGE TALES #8-10
          THE RAMPAGING HULK #9
          MARVEL FANFARE #56-59
          KA-ZAR THE SAVAGE #1-34
          SENSATIONAL SPIDER-MAN #13-15
          KA-ZAR OF THE SAVAGE LAND #1
          KA-ZAR ANNUAL #1
          KA-ZAR #1-20
          WOLVERINE/World Wildlife Fund: GLOBAL JEOPARDY #1
          MARVEL GRAPHIC NOVEL-- KA-ZAR: GUNS OF THE SAVAGE LAND
          SHANNA - the MAX series

          And for the record, Dean, good call about Shanna being an original
          character in that her origins were very different than any other
          jungle action based character since the pulps and Golden Age comics.

          Frank Cho will go back to basics with Shanna, probably starting off
          from where Shanna was beginning to get her feet wet in the mud and
          blood of the Savage Land (circa 1980), squaring off in life and death
          struggles to survive against raptors and other primative predators
          and villains. It would seem to be the best way to compliment the more
          proven ways of storytelling, without Ka-Zar completely taking over or
          the excess of environmentalism. I just hope Frank does not forget
          that Shanna was formerly a famous star athlete and a noted
          veteranarian before becoming a considerably powerful jungle woman who
          can survive in the wild.
        • jfglade
          Dean, Granted, all jungle gals do owe something to Sheena (who, interestingly enough, first appeared in the Australian Wags magazine), but Sheena is
          Message 4 of 11 , Aug 12, 2002
            Dean,

            Granted, all "jungle gals" do owe something to Sheena (who,
            interestingly enough, first appeared in the Australian 'Wags'
            magazine), but Sheena is more-or-less a female Tarzan, an inversion
            of type. Timely had an early and very short-lived jungle gal of their
            own, although I'll be danged if I can remember her name. I can
            remember the rash of "jungle queens" during the early fifites, and
            Atlas had at least two of their own, one of whom, Jan of the Jungle
            (or perhaps it was Janna, this has been some time ago and while I can
            remember the character I might not have the exact name) made it past
            the coming of the comics code and was around until late '57 or so.And
            you're right, Shanna was a breath of fresh air back in the very early
            seventies, she was derivative, to be certain, but it was nice to see
            Marvel trying to pump a little life into older genres, including the
            horror genre with the unlikely fusion of monsters and costumed
            villains, like we eventually had in 'Ghost Rider' and 'Werewolf by
            Night', both of which first appeared about the same time as Shanna.

            Take care,
            Jon
            --- In theallwinnerssquad@y..., sonofvulcan <no_reply@y...> wrote:
            > I never knew of course that Shanna was an homage/rip-off of Sheena
            of
            > the Jungle way back when I first encountered the book in Marvel's
            ill-
            > fated attempt to attract female readers with this book, and others
            > like The Cat and Night Nurse. Of the group Shanna was the strongest
            > in terms of concept and talent. Ross Andru and Vince Colletta
            teamed
            > up for some great artwork on these issues.
            >
            > Like Ka-Zar who was revived way, way back in the original X-Men by
            > Lee and Kirby (just like the revivals of Subby in FF and Avengers,
            > but not given nearly so much attention), Shanna was a try to
            > reestablish the once fertile jungle epic which was all too common
            in
            > the pulps. It was at exactly this same time that Marvel was trying
            > its hand at Doc Savage (Ross Andru again as it turns out) and DC
            was
            > giving Mike Kaluta his ticket to stardom with The Shadow. In the
            > constant search for material, the old stuff which had proven so
            > successful with Conan for Marvel and Tarzan for DC (under Joe
            > Kubert's expert hand) was seen as a rich vein to mine. Sadly not
            all
            > of it took off.
            >
            > Dean
          • earthelemental99
            The 1970 s brought back a lot of genres not seen since the Marvel s Golden Age. This was a time when horror monsters, barbarians, bad girls, sorcerors, and
            Message 5 of 11 , Aug 13, 2002
              The 1970's brought back a lot of genres not seen since the Marvel's
              Golden Age. This was a time when horror monsters, barbarians, bad
              girls, sorcerors, and kung-fu masters ruled supreme...

              TOWER OF SHADOWS/CREATURES ON THE LOOSE #1-37 (1969-1975)
              CHAMBER OF DARKNESS/MONSTERS ON THE PROWL #1-30 (1969-1974)
              ASTONISHING TALES #1-36 (1970-1976)
              CONAN THE BARBARIAN #1-275 (1970-1993)
              KULL THE CONQUEROR/DESTROYER #1-29 (1971-1978)
              SAVAGE TALES #1 -12 (1971-1975)
              TOMB OF DRACULA #1-70 (1972-1979)
              WEREWOLF BY NIGHT #1-43 (1972-1977)
              FEAR #10-31 (1972-1975)
              JUNGLE ACTION #1-24 (1972-1976)
              NIGHT NURSE #1-4 (1972-1973)
              THE CLAWS OF THE CAT #1-4 (1972-1973)
              SHANNA THE SHE-DEVIL #1-5 (1972-1973)
              SUPERNATURAL THRILLERS #1-15 (1972-1975)
              THE MONSTER OF FRANKENSTEIN #1-18 (1973-1975)
              WAR IS HELL #1-15 (1973-1975)
              DRACULA LIVES #1-13 (1973-1975)
              MONSTERS UNLEASHED #1-11 (1973-1975)
              THE HAUNT OF HORROR #1-5 (1973-1974)
              TALES OF THE ZOMBIE #1-10 (1973-1975)
              VAMPIRE TALES #1-11 (1973-1975)
              GHOST RIDER #1-81 (1973-1983)
              KA-ZAR, LORD OF THE HIDDEN JUNGLE #1-20 (1974-1977)
              MAN-THING #1-22 (1974-1975)
              THE DEADLY HANDS OF KUNG FU #1-33 (1974-1977)
              SHANG CHI, THE MASTER OF KUNG FU #17-125 (1974-1983)
              DOCTOR STRANGE #1-81 (1974-1987)
              SKULL, THE SLAYER #1-8 (1975-1976)
              MARVEL CHILLERS #1-7 (1975-1976)
              HELLSTROM, THE SON OF SATAN #1-8 (1975-1977)
              RED SONJA #1-15 (1977-1979)
            • sonofvulcan
              As I recollect reading somewhere, Marvel was able to expand so dramatically at this time because they had at last gotten free of the stranglehold DC had on
              Message 6 of 11 , Aug 14, 2002
                As I recollect reading somewhere, Marvel was able to expand so
                dramatically at this time because they had at last gotten free of the
                stranglehold DC had on their distribution. The company fairly
                exploded in the early 70's and I frankly couldn't keep up. I made a
                decision to hang with the superheroes, but I couldn't get all the
                other horror material and reprint stuff they were putting out. In
                more recent years I have made some attempt to get ahold of some of
                these very entertaining comics. Marvel's reprint lines of the 70's
                are becoming increasingly valuable sources of classic comics from
                decades previous.

                Dean
              • sonofvulcan
                I didn t see Shanna s Marvel Presents series on your list. If perchance you haven t seen those several issues of that bi-weekly comic, I highly recommend it.
                Message 7 of 11 , Aug 14, 2002
                  I didn't see Shanna's Marvel Presents series on your list. If
                  perchance you haven't seen those several issues of that bi-weekly
                  comic, I highly recommend it. Paul Gulacy did the art and frankly,
                  Shanna never looked more sexy. Marvel Presents ended up printing a
                  lot of junk, but some of the stuff was first rate, and this series is
                  certainly among the very best stuff they ever did. It deserves to be
                  collected in some form. I don't have the numbers of the series, but I
                  could check that out for you if you want.

                  Dean
                • earthelemental99
                  I don t have the Marvel Presents issues or the recent Captain America jungle arc (from two years back?) where Shanna was last seen. Could you spoil those
                  Message 8 of 11 , Aug 15, 2002
                    I don't have the Marvel Presents issues or the recent Captain America
                    jungle arc (from two years back?) where Shanna was last seen.
                    Could you spoil those storylines for me so I can have a reference for
                    them? Did Shanna do anything important in Marvel Presents that I
                    should know about? And what exactly happened in the Cap story?

                    I have those awful NAMOR issues where Sub-Mariner first met Shanna
                    when he visited the Savage Land, but I almost wish I didn't!!! (so I
                    didn't include Namor on my list either) Nowhere else was Shanna
                    written so badly than in that two-bit cameo appearance by Byrne.
                    The team-up with Wolverine for the W.W.F. was actually better.
                    The only thing important about Namor was that it paved the way for
                    the Sensational Spider-Man arc that followed. The post-clone Spidey
                    story wasn't great, but it did provide a warm-up for the final Ka-Zar
                    series begun by Waid & Kubert.


                    My favorite Shanna story (after the original SHANNA series) is
                    the "Savage Tales" arc and its shocking wrap-up included in the
                    classic Rampaging Hulk issue.
                    Steve Gerber also got off to a good start on the 1979 Shanna series
                    (Marvel Fanfare) but the L.A. story arc fell completely flat, only
                    two issues in! Not surprising, seeing it took him over a decade to
                    finish.(with editorial help)

                    I think I can recommend Guns of the Savage Land, though it looks a
                    lot further into the future of Ka-Zar and Shanna and the nature of
                    their relationship. Wyatt Wingfoot appears also.

                    Frank Cho's Shanna (marking her third trip to the Savage Land, in a
                    1980-81 flashback?) probably falls between the end of
                    Gerber's "Shanna in L.A." story arc, and the beginning of Bruce
                    Jones' new "civilized" direction for Ka-Zar.

                    In other words, a decent fresh start for a new reader because the
                    whole business Shanna had with her taming Ka-Zar hadn't started yet.
                  • earthelemental99
                    ... the ... Isn t it great that we collectors now have the Grand Comics Database as a free informational resource? For longtime enthuiasts especially, who want
                    Message 9 of 11 , Aug 15, 2002
                      --- In theallwinnerssquad@y..., sonofvulcan <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                      > As I recollect reading somewhere, Marvel was able to expand so
                      > dramatically at this time because they had at last gotten free of
                      the
                      > stranglehold DC had on their distribution. The company fairly
                      > exploded in the early 70's and I frankly couldn't keep up. I made a
                      > decision to hang with the superheroes, but I couldn't get all the
                      > other horror material and reprint stuff they were putting out. In
                      > more recent years I have made some attempt to get ahold of some of
                      > these very entertaining comics. Marvel's reprint lines of the 70's
                      > are becoming increasingly valuable sources of classic comics from
                      > decades previous.
                      >
                      > Dean

                      Isn't it great that we collectors now have the Grand Comics Database
                      as a free informational resource? For longtime enthuiasts especially,
                      who want to do some serious research and catching up on whatever
                      interesting, "lost" comics there are out there from any point in the
                      publisher's past. Comics collecting is no longer a guessing game, but
                      rather a "Now you see it, now you don't, here it comes again!"
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