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  • Alan Bunning
    Here is a new website I have created that contains electronic transcriptions of all extant manuscripts and quotations of the Greek New Testament up to a
    Message 1 of 18 , Jul 4, 2013
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      Here is a new website I have created that contains electronic transcriptions of all extant manuscripts and quotations of the Greek New Testament up to a terminus ad quem of 400 AD. There is also a verse-by-verse collation of these manuscripts for the entire New Testament. This beta version might be a little slow at times because it is on a free hosting site, so please don’t start linking to the site yet or the bandwidth limits would soon be exceeded. Right now I am just looking for feedback and will probably move the site to a more permanent URL later. The website is at
       
       
      The individual transcriptions and the collation are located under the manuscripts tab. Please let me know of any comments you have.
       
      Alan Bunning
    • David Inglis
      Alan, thank you. I have already used your website to compare all variants of Lk 12:28 against those in Mt 6:30. Using two tabs in my browser your format made
      Message 2 of 18 , Jul 4, 2013
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        Alan, thank you. I have already used your website to compare all variants of Lk 12:28 against those in Mt 6:30. Using two tabs in my browser your format made it WAY easier than any method I had found before today. However, I know this is still in beta, so I wonder whether you might at some point be able to show the mss for all synoptic parallels of a verse in one browser tab or window, which would make it even easier to look, for example, for signs of directionality. However, again, thanks.

        David Inglis, Lafayette, CA, 94549, USA

         

        From: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com [mailto:textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Alan Bunning
        Sent: Thursday, July 04, 2013 5:32 AM
        To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [textualcriticism] New website

         

         

        Here is a new website I have created that contains electronic transcriptions of all extant manuscripts and quotations of the Greek New Testament up to a terminus ad quem of 400 AD. There is also a verse-by-verse collation of these manuscripts for the entire New Testament. This beta version might be a little slow at times because it is on a free hosting site, so please don’t start linking to the site yet or the bandwidth limits would soon be exceeded. Right now I am just looking for feedback and will probably move the site to a more permanent URL later. The website is at

         

         

        The individual transcriptions and the collation are located under the manuscripts tab. Please let me know of any comments you have.

         

        Alan Bunning


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      • yennifmit
        Hi Alan, Thanks very much for making this site. It looks terrific. Best, Tim Finney
        Message 3 of 18 , Jul 4, 2013
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          Hi Alan,

          Thanks very much for making this site. It looks terrific.

          Best,

          Tim Finney

          --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, Alan Bunning <gninnub@...> wrote:
          >
          > Here is a new website I have created that contains
          > electronic transcriptions of all extant manuscripts and quotations of the Greek
          > New Testament up to a terminus ad quem of 400 AD. There is also a
          > verse-by-verse collation of these manuscripts for the entire New Testament.
          > This beta version might be a little slow at times because it is on a free
          > hosting site, so please don’t start linking to the site yet or the bandwidth
          > limits would soon be exceeded. Right now I am just looking for feedback and
          > will probably move the site to a more permanent URL later. The website is at
          >  
          > http://cntr.elementfx.com
          >  
          > The individual transcriptions and the collation are located
          > under the manuscripts tab. Please let me know of any comments you have.
          >  
          > Alan Bunning
          >
        • Vox Verax
          The arrangement of the materials looks very good. The oversimplified caricatures of the approaches used by earlier NT text-compilers in the initial essay are
          Message 4 of 18 , Jul 6, 2013
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            The arrangement of the materials looks very good.

            The oversimplified caricatures of the approaches used by earlier NT text-compilers in the initial essay are very bad, though. If I wasn't already doing a dozen other things I'd go into detail about that.

            In the KoineGreek font, the Xi is not quite right. (I really like the use of a plain uncial font, though; I made something similar for the Greek Uncial Archetype of Mark.)

            Yours in Christ,

            James Snapp, Jr.
          • bucksburg
            http://cntr.elementfx.com What is the oft-used ligature that either looks like a hooked K or IS run together? Daniel Buck
            Message 5 of 18 , Jul 9, 2013
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              http://cntr.elementfx.com

              What is the oft-used ligature that either looks like a hooked K or IS run together?

              Daniel Buck
            • Dave Washburn
              I believe that, at least in many uncials, it s an end-of-line abbreviation of KAI. Dave Washburn http://www.nyx.net/~dwashbur Check out my review show, No Life
              Message 6 of 18 , Jul 9, 2013
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                I believe that, at least in many uncials, it's an end-of-line abbreviation of KAI.

                Dave Washburn
                http://www.nyx.net/~dwashbur
                Check out my review show, No Life With Irving



                To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
                From: bucksburg@...
                Date: Tue, 9 Jul 2013 19:18:57 +0000
                Subject: [textualcriticism] Re: New website

                 
                http://cntr.elementfx.com

                What is the oft-used ligature that either looks like a hooked K or IS run together?

                Daniel Buck


              • yennifmit
                Hi Daniel (and Dave), Yes, it s a KAI compendium. They can occur anywhere, not just at the end of a line. A good book which covers such things is: Gardthausen,
                Message 7 of 18 , Jul 9, 2013
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                  Hi Daniel (and Dave),

                  Yes, it's a KAI compendium. They can occur anywhere, not just at the end of a line. A good book which covers such things is:

                  Gardthausen, V. 1913. Griechische Palaeographie. Vol. 2. Die Schrift,
                  Unterschriften und Chronologie im Alterum und im Byzantinischen
                  Mittelalter. 2nd ed. Leipzig: Veit. Repr. 1978. Berlin: Nationales
                  Druckhaus.

                  Best,

                  Tim Finney

                  --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, Dave Washburn <davidlwashburn@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I believe that, at least in many uncials, it's an end-of-line abbreviation of KAI.
                  >
                  > Dave Washburn
                  > http://www.nyx.net/~dwashbur
                  > Check out my review show, No Life With Irving
                  >
                  >
                  > To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
                  > From: bucksburg@...
                  > Date: Tue, 9 Jul 2013 19:18:57 +0000
                  > Subject: [textualcriticism] Re: New website
                  >
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                  > http://cntr.elementfx.com
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                  > What is the oft-used ligature that either looks like a hooked K or IS run together?
                  >
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                  > Daniel Buck
                  >
                • Dave Washburn
                  Thanks for the correction. I only remembered seeing them at line ends, but it s also been a very long time since I buried my nose in a manuscript. Dave
                  Message 8 of 18 , Jul 9, 2013
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                    Thanks for the correction. I only remembered seeing them at line ends, but it's also been a very long time since I buried my nose in a manuscript.

                    Dave Washburn
                    http://www.nyx.net/~dwashbur
                    Check out my review show, No Life With Irving



                    To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
                    From: tjf@...
                    Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2013 04:42:30 +0000
                    Subject: [textualcriticism] Re: New website

                     
                    Hi Daniel (and Dave),

                    Yes, it's a KAI compendium. They can occur anywhere, not just at the end of a line. A good book which covers such things is:

                    Gardthausen, V. 1913. Griechische Palaeographie. Vol. 2. Die Schrift,
                    Unterschriften und Chronologie im Alterum und im Byzantinischen
                    Mittelalter. 2nd ed. Leipzig: Veit. Repr. 1978. Berlin: Nationales
                    Druckhaus.

                    Best,

                    Tim Finney

                    --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, Dave Washburn <davidlwashburn@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I believe that, at least in many uncials, it's an end-of-line abbreviation of KAI.
                    >
                    > Dave Washburn
                    > http://www.nyx.net/~dwashbur
                    > Check out my review show, No Life With Irving
                    >
                    >
                    > To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
                    > From: bucksburg@...
                    > Date: Tue, 9 Jul 2013 19:18:57 +0000
                    > Subject: [textualcriticism] Re: New website
                    >
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                    > http://cntr.elementfx.com
                    >
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                    > What is the oft-used ligature that either looks like a hooked K or IS run together?
                    >
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                    >
                    > Daniel Buck
                    >


                  • John McChesney-Young
                    ... It s available online here: http://archive.org/details/griechischepaleo02gard John -- John McChesney-Young ** Berkeley, California, U.S.A.
                    Message 9 of 18 , Jul 10, 2013
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                      On Tue, Jul 9, 2013 at 9:42 PM, yennifmit <tjf@...> wrote:

                      > Yes, it's a KAI compendium. They can occur anywhere, not just at the end of a line. A good book which covers such things is:
                      >
                      > Gardthausen, V. 1913. Griechische Palaeographie. Vol. 2. Die Schrift,
                      > Unterschriften und Chronologie im Alterum und im Byzantinischen
                      > Mittelalter. 2nd ed. Leipzig: Veit. Repr. 1978. Berlin: Nationales
                      > Druckhaus.

                      It's available online here:

                      http://archive.org/details/griechischepaleo02gard

                      John




                      --
                      John McChesney-Young ** Berkeley, California, U.S.A.
                      JMcCYoung~at~gmail.com ** http://gplus.to/jmccyoung
                    • yennifmit
                      Thanks John! Pages 335-52 are especially useful when deciphering minuscules. Best, Tim Finney
                      Message 10 of 18 , Jul 10, 2013
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                        Thanks John!

                        Pages 335-52 are especially useful when deciphering minuscules.

                        Best,

                        Tim Finney

                        --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, John McChesney-Young <jmccyoung@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > On Tue, Jul 9, 2013 at 9:42 PM, yennifmit <tjf@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > > Yes, it's a KAI compendium. They can occur anywhere, not just at the end of a line. A good book which covers such things is:
                        > >
                        > > Gardthausen, V. 1913. Griechische Palaeographie. Vol. 2. Die Schrift,
                        > > Unterschriften und Chronologie im Alterum und im Byzantinischen
                        > > Mittelalter. 2nd ed. Leipzig: Veit. Repr. 1978. Berlin: Nationales
                        > > Druckhaus.
                        >
                        > It's available online here:
                        >
                        > http://archive.org/details/griechischepaleo02gard
                        >
                        > John
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > --
                        > John McChesney-Young ** Berkeley, California, U.S.A.
                        > JMcCYoung~at~gmail.com ** http://gplus.to/jmccyoung
                        >
                      • Mr. Buck
                        I didn t find the IS symbol yet, but page 342 shows the angled ice-cream-cone symbol as HLIOS CRUSOS TRIADIKON CROOS.   Daniel Buck 
                        Message 11 of 18 , Jul 11, 2013
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                          I didn't find the IS symbol yet, but page 342 shows the angled ice-cream-cone symbol as HLIOS CRUSOS TRIADIKON CROOS.

                           
                          Daniel Buck 

                          From: yennifmit <tjf@...>
                          To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Wednesday, July 10, 2013 9:08 PM
                          Subject: [textualcriticism] Re: New website

                           
                          Thanks John!

                          Pages 335-52 are especially useful when deciphering minuscules.

                          Best,

                          Tim Finney

                          --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, John McChesney-Young <jmccyoung@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > On Tue, Jul 9, 2013 at 9:42 PM, yennifmit <tjf@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > > Yes, it's a KAI compendium. They can occur anywhere, not just at the end of a line. A good book which covers such things is:
                          > >
                          > > Gardthausen, V. 1913. Griechische Palaeographie. Vol. 2. Die Schrift,
                          > > Unterschriften und Chronologie im Alterum und im Byzantinischen
                          > > Mittelalter. 2nd ed. Leipzig: Veit. Repr. 1978. Berlin: Nationales
                          > > Druckhaus.
                          >
                          > It's available online here:
                          >
                          > http://archive.org/details/griechischepaleo02gard
                          >
                          > John
                        • yennifmit
                          Hi Daniel, The entry for KAI compendium is at the top of p. 338. Gardthausen doesn t show the initial vertical stroke of the KAPPA for some reason. Here is his
                          Message 12 of 18 , Jul 11, 2013
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                            Hi Daniel,

                            The entry for KAI compendium is at the top of p. 338. Gardthausen doesn't show the initial vertical stroke of the KAPPA for some reason. Here is his explanation courtesy of Google translate:

                            "KAI is perhaps the most common word, its forms are very diverse. One must start from the tachygraphic form < with shortcut slash /; then this is occasionally extended over the line and ends with the accent; also, the angle may be rounded."

                            The inverted cone symbol on p. 342 represents the sun.

                            Best,

                            Tim Finney

                            --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "Mr. Buck" <bucksburg@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > I didn't find the IS symbol yet, but page 342 shows the angled ice-cream-cone symbol as HLIOS CRUSOS TRIADIKON CROOS.
                            >
                            >
                            > �
                            > Daniel Buck�
                            >
                            >
                            > ________________________________
                            > From: yennifmit <tjf@...>
                            > To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
                            > Sent: Wednesday, July 10, 2013 9:08 PM
                            > Subject: [textualcriticism] Re: New website
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > �
                            > Thanks John!
                            >
                            > Pages 335-52 are especially useful when deciphering minuscules.
                            >
                            > Best,
                            >
                            > Tim Finney
                            >
                            > --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, John McChesney-Young <jmccyoung@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > On Tue, Jul 9, 2013 at 9:42 PM, yennifmit <tjf@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > > Yes, it's a KAI compendium. They can occur anywhere, not just at the end of a line. A good book which covers such things is:
                            > > >
                            > > > Gardthausen, V. 1913. Griechische Palaeographie. Vol. 2. Die Schrift,
                            > > > Unterschriften und Chronologie im Alterum und im Byzantinischen
                            > > > Mittelalter. 2nd ed. Leipzig: Veit. Repr. 1978. Berlin: Nationales
                            > > > Druckhaus.
                            > >
                            > > It's available online here:
                            > >
                            > > http://archive.org/details/griechischepaleo02gard
                            > >
                            > > John
                            >
                          • Atef Wagih
                            Hi all, In Jonah 3:4 in the MT it says that after forty days the city will be destroyed. While in the LXX is says after three days...etc The explanation I read
                            Message 13 of 18 , Jul 14, 2013
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                              Hi all,

                              In Jonah 3:4 in the MT it says that after forty days the city will be destroyed.
                              While in the LXX is says after three days...etc

                              The explanation I read about this is that this is a coying error in the LXX.

                              I checked it in Coptic and found it "three", i believe that this is because it is based on the LXX.

                              My Question is: do we have copies of the book of Jonah in the Dead Sea scrolls? and if so what does it read?

                              Thank you very much.

                              In Christ,
                              Atef
                            • Steve Puluka
                              ... I checked in Abegg s The Dead Sea Scrolls Bible and Jonah is not listed as extant in the collection. This book collects into modern Bible order and
                              Message 14 of 18 , Jul 14, 2013
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                                On Jul 14, 2013, at 7:49 PM, Atef Wagih wrote:

                                > Hi all,
                                >
                                > In Jonah 3:4 in the MT it says that after forty days the city will be destroyed.
                                > While in the LXX is says after three days...etc
                                >
                                > The explanation I read about this is that this is a coying error in the LXX.
                                >
                                > I checked it in Coptic and found it "three", i believe that this is because it is based on the LXX.
                                >
                                > My Question is: do we have copies of the book of Jonah in the Dead Sea scrolls? and if so what does it read?

                                I checked in Abegg's "The Dead Sea Scrolls Bible" and Jonah is not listed as extant in the collection. This book collects into modern Bible order and format all the scripture from the Dead Sea Scrolls in an English translation of those texts. This includes references on their original location in the scrolls collection.

                                This is a convenient and affordable volume.

                                Steve Puluka
                                Cantor Holy Ghost Mckees Rocks - Carpatho-Rusyn tradition
                                MA Theology Duquesne University
                                http://puluka.com/home
                              • Dave Washburn
                                My book, A Catalog of Biblical Passages in the Dead Sea Scrolls (published by SBL) is a listing of all passages preserved both in the biblical and
                                Message 15 of 18 , Jul 14, 2013
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                                  My book, "A Catalog of Biblical Passages in the Dead Sea Scrolls (published by SBL) is a listing of all passages preserved both in the biblical and non-biblical scrolls. Unfortunately, I just moved 3 days ago and still don't know where all my copies are...

                                  (And I believe the paperback costs less than the DSS Bible...)

                                  Dave Washburn
                                  http://www.nyx.net/~dwashbur
                                  Check out my review show, No Life With Irving



                                  To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
                                  From: spuluka@...
                                  Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2013 19:57:30 -0400
                                  Subject: Re: [textualcriticism] Jonah 3:4 between the MT & LXX

                                   
                                  On Jul 14, 2013, at 7:49 PM, Atef Wagih wrote:

                                  > Hi all,
                                  >
                                  > In Jonah 3:4 in the MT it says that after forty days the city will be destroyed.
                                  > While in the LXX is says after three days...etc
                                  >
                                  > The explanation I read about this is that this is a coying error in the LXX.
                                  >
                                  > I checked it in Coptic and found it "three", i believe that this is because it is based on the LXX.
                                  >
                                  > My Question is: do we have copies of the book of Jonah in the Dead Sea scrolls? and if so what does it read?

                                  I checked in Abegg's "The Dead Sea Scrolls Bible" and Jonah is not listed as extant in the collection. This book collects into modern Bible order and format all the scripture from the Dead Sea Scrolls in an English translation of those texts. This includes references on their original location in the scrolls collection.

                                  This is a convenient and affordable volume.

                                  Steve Puluka
                                  Cantor Holy Ghost Mckees Rocks - Carpatho-Rusyn tradition
                                  MA Theology Duquesne University
                                  http://puluka.com/home


                                • Dave Washburn
                                  My book, A Catalog of Biblical Passages in the Dead Sea Scrolls (published by SBL) is a listing of all passages preserved both in the biblical and
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Jul 14, 2013
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                                    My book, "A Catalog of Biblical Passages in the Dead Sea Scrolls (published by SBL) is a listing of all passages preserved both in the biblical and non-biblical scrolls. Unfortunately, I just moved 3 days ago and still don't know where all my copies are...

                                    (And I believe the paperback costs less than the DSS Bible...)

                                    Dave Washburn
                                    http://www.nyx.net/~dwashbur
                                    Check out my review show, No Life With Irving



                                    To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
                                    From: spuluka@...
                                    Date: Sun, 14 Jul 2013 19:57:30 -0400
                                    Subject: Re: [textualcriticism] Jonah 3:4 between the MT & LXX

                                     
                                    On Jul 14, 2013, at 7:49 PM, Atef Wagih wrote:

                                    > Hi all,
                                    >
                                    > In Jonah 3:4 in the MT it says that after forty days the city will be destroyed.
                                    > While in the LXX is says after three days...etc
                                    >
                                    > The explanation I read about this is that this is a coying error in the LXX.
                                    >
                                    > I checked it in Coptic and found it "three", i believe that this is because it is based on the LXX.
                                    >
                                    > My Question is: do we have copies of the book of Jonah in the Dead Sea scrolls? and if so what does it read?

                                    I checked in Abegg's "The Dead Sea Scrolls Bible" and Jonah is not listed as extant in the collection. This book collects into modern Bible order and format all the scripture from the Dead Sea Scrolls in an English translation of those texts. This includes references on their original location in the scrolls collection.

                                    This is a convenient and affordable volume.

                                    Steve Puluka
                                    Cantor Holy Ghost Mckees Rocks - Carpatho-Rusyn tradition
                                    MA Theology Duquesne University
                                    http://puluka.com/home


                                  • Drew Longacre
                                    Atef, according to Ulrich, 4QXII(a, g, and f) have Jonah, but not this verse. The Nahal Hever Greek minor prophets scroll apparently reads forty, however.  
                                    Message 17 of 18 , Jul 15, 2013
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                                      Atef, according to Ulrich, 4QXII(a, g, and f) have Jonah, but not this verse. The Nahal Hever Greek minor prophets scroll apparently reads "forty," however.
                                       
                                      -Drew Longacre

                                      From: Atef Wagih <atef_wagih@...>
                                      To: "textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com" <textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com>
                                      Sent: Monday, July 15, 2013 12:49 AM
                                      Subject: [textualcriticism] Jonah 3:4 between the MT & LXX
                                       
                                      Hi all,

                                      In Jonah 3:4 in the MT it says that after forty days the city will be destroyed.
                                      While in the LXX is says after three days...etc

                                      The explanation I read about this is that this is a coying error in the LXX.

                                      I checked it in Coptic and found it "three", i believe that this is because it is based on the LXX.

                                      My Question is: do we have copies of the book of Jonah in the Dead Sea scrolls? and if so what does it read?

                                      Thank you very much.

                                      In Christ,
                                      Atef
                                    • Mr. Buck
                                      I m reading 1 Kingdoms in the Breton LXX and realizing how corrupted the text became by the 4th century--for example, an interpolation of Jeremiah 9:23 into
                                      Message 18 of 18 , Jul 15, 2013
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                                        I'm reading 1 Kingdoms in the Breton LXX and realizing how corrupted the text became by the 4th century--for example, an interpolation of Jeremiah 9:23 into 2:10.

                                        This looks to me like a remote harmonization to Matthew 12:40.
                                         
                                        Daniel Buck

                                        From: Drew Longacre <drewlongacre@...>

                                         
                                        Atef, according to Ulrich, 4QXII(a, g, and f) have Jonah, but not this verse. The Nahal Hever Greek minor prophets scroll apparently reads "forty," however.
                                         
                                        -Drew Longacre

                                        From: Atef Wagih <atef_wagih@...>
                                         
                                        Hi all,

                                        In Jonah 3:4 in the MT it says that after forty days the city will be destroyed.
                                        While in the LXX is says after three days...etc
                                        . . .
                                        In Christ,
                                        Atef

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