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Re: [textualcriticism] Annotations with Umlauts in a Vulgate Gospels-MS from Freising

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  • Daniel Buck
    If you re following the page numbers on the actual codex, they begin 95 pages later than as numbered below.   Daniel Buck ________________________________
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 9, 2012
      If you're following the page numbers on the actual codex, they begin 95 pages later than as numbered below.
       
      Daniel Buck

      From: Vox Verax <james.snapp@...> 
       


      [If you have the PDF, you can jump to page 76 for the portrait of Matthew.]

      Mt. 5:25 (p. 86) – EUNOUN
      Mt. 6:7 (p. 89) – BATTOLOGECETE
      Mt. 6:11 (p. 89) – EPIOSION
      Mt. 6:20 (p. 90) – AFANIZEI
      Mt. 8:3 (p. 95) – KAQARISENTI (intending KAQARISQHTI)
      Mt. 13:38 (p. 116) – TOU PONHROU
      Mt. 17:5 (p. 126) – HUDOKHSA (intending EUDOKHSA)
      Mt. 18:8 (p. 131) – KULLON
      Mt. 24:17 (p. 152) – EPI TOU DWMATOS
      Mt. 26:74 (p. 164) - KATAQHMATIZEIN

      [Mark Portrait on p. 174. (Who knew Mark had a taste for chili-pepper?)]

      Mk. 1:11 (p. 179) – EUDOKHSA
      Mk. 2:19 (p. 183) – NUMFWNOS
      Mk. 2:21 (p. 183) – ENIBHMA (intending EPIBLHMA)
      Mk. 2:21 (p. 183) – PLHRWMA
      Mk. 3:10 (p. 184) – MASTIGAS
      Mk. 7:3 (p. 196) – NUKNH (intending PUKNA?)
      Mk. 7:34 (p. 199) – DIANOCQHTI
      Mk. 9:20 (p. 204) – ESPARAZEN
      Mk. 10:17 (p. 207) – KLHRONOMHSW
      [208 (last line) – bickle without a note]
      Mk. 12:15 (p. 214) - UPOKRISIN
      Mk. 12:30 (p. 215) – ISCOUS SOU
      Mk. 14:3 (p. 220) – PISTIKHS
      Mk. 14:3 (p. 220) – SINTRIASA TO ALABASTRON
      Mk. 14:6 (p. 220) – KOPOU PARHXETE
      Mk. 14:20 (p. 221) – TRUBLION
      Mk. 14:32 (p. 222) – KORISH (intending CWRION)
      Mk. 14:33 (p. 222) – EKTANBEISQAI (intending EKQAMBEISQAI)
      Mk. 14:44 (p. 223) - ASFALOS
      Mk. 14:51 (p. 223) – EPI GUMNOS

      [Portrait of Luke on p. 234]

      Lk. 1:2 (p. 244) – LITOPTAI (intending AUTOPTAI)
      Lk. 1:4 (p. 244) – KATHCHQHS
      Lk. 1:18 (p. 245) – PROBEBHKULIA
      Lk. 2:1 (p. 249) – DOGMA
      Lk. 2:8 (p. 249) – AGRAILOINQES (intending AGRAULOUNTES)
      Lk. 2:14 (p. 250) – EIDOKIAS (intending EUDOKIAS)
      Lk. 2:28 (p. 251) – EIS TAS ANIKALAS [The "L" is a Latin L, shaped like an English capital L.] (intending EIS TAS AGKALAS)
      Lk. 2:41 (p. 252) – KAT ETOS
      Lk. 3:22 (p. 255) – EUDOKESA
      Lk. 4:36 (p. 259) – QAMBOS
      Lk. 5:26 (p. 263) – EKTASIS (intending EKSTASIS)
      Lk. 6:23 (p. 266) – KAI SKIRTESATE
      Lk. 11:3 (p. 287) – TON EPIOUSION
      Lk. 11:53 (p. 292) – KAI EPISTOMATIZEIN (intending KAI APOSTOMATIZEIN)
      Lk. 12:29 (p. 294) – NETEWRIZESTEI (intending METEWRIZESQE)
      Lk. 23:33 (p. 334) – KAKOURGOUS
      Lk. 23:39 (p. 334) – KAKOURGWN

      [Portrait of John is on p. 344]

      Jn. 7:4 (p. 370) – EN PARRHSIA
      Jn. 11:14 (p. 386) – PARRHSIA
      Jn. 11:27 (p. 387) – ERCOMENOS
      Jn. 18:20 (p. 408) – PARRHSIA

      Now it occurs to me that with the exception of the four readings in John, most of these Greek words or phrases are words or phrases which occur only once in the books in which they appear. When I realized this, an idea popped into my head: what if some copyists placed the ".." mark and the trickle-mark alongside a line of text to alert the reader/copyist that a once-used word, or an otherwise (potentially) troublesome word, occurred in that line?

      It might be interesting to sift through Vaticanus to see how many lines that are accompanied by umlauts/bickles/distigmai (and, in the OT, trickles) contain words which occur in that book only once (or almost only once) or which are used in an unusual way.

      Yours in Christ,

      James Snapp, Jr.



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