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Annotations with Umlauts in a Vulgate Gospels-MS from Freising

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  • Vox Verax
    An interesting Vulgate Gospels-MS produced c. 860 is featured at http://daten.digitale-sammlungen.de/~db/0004/bsb00047303/images/ and at
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 8, 2012
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      An interesting Vulgate Gospels-MS produced c. 860 is featured at
      http://daten.digitale-sammlungen.de/~db/0004/bsb00047303/images/
      and at http://www.wdl.org/en/item/8921/ .

      As its brief profile states, "The marvelous manuscript, written during the episcopate of Anno of Freising (854-75), has in the margins of its leaves numerous critical notes on the text, including a series of Greek variants." In an earlier post I called this the Freising Gospels but there are at least two Vulgate Gospels-books associated with Freising so *a* Vulgate-Gospels produced at Freising might be a better name, or perhaps "Freising Gospels of the Slouching Evangelists." One thing special about it is that pages 53-56 are purple.

      Now about those marginal notes that mention Greek variants. I wouldn't call them variants (although in a few cases they do occur where a variant exists, such as at Luke 2:14). They are readings. They are typically accompanied by an umlaut (i.e., a distigma, like the ones in the margin of Vaticanus) or by a trickle (three points of a triangle without its edges); the top dot often is a short slash.

      Here they are:

      [If you have the PDF, you can jump to page 76 for the portrait of Matthew.]

      Mt. 5:25 (p. 86) – EUNOUN
      Mt. 6:7 (p. 89) – BATTOLOGECETE
      Mt. 6:11 (p. 89) – EPIOSION
      Mt. 6:20 (p. 90) – AFANIZEI
      Mt. 8:3 (p. 95) – KAQARISENTI (intending KAQARISQHTI)
      Mt. 13:38 (p. 116) – TOU PONHROU
      Mt. 17:5 (p. 126) – HUDOKHSA (intending EUDOKHSA)
      Mt. 18:8 (p. 131) – KULLON
      Mt. 24:17 (p. 152) – EPI TOU DWMATOS
      Mt. 26:74 (p. 164) - KATAQHMATIZEIN

      [Mark Portrait on p. 174. (Who knew Mark had a taste for chili-pepper?)]

      Mk. 1:11 (p. 179) – EUDOKHSA
      Mk. 2:19 (p. 183) – NUMFWNOS
      Mk. 2:21 (p. 183) – ENIBHMA (intending EPIBLHMA)
      Mk. 2:21 (p. 183) – PLHRWMA
      Mk. 3:10 (p. 184) – MASTIGAS
      Mk. 7:3 (p. 196) – NUKNH (intending PUKNA?)
      Mk. 7:34 (p. 199) – DIANOCQHTI
      Mk. 9:20 (p. 204) – ESPARAZEN
      Mk. 10:17 (p. 207) – KLHRONOMHSW
      [208 (last line) – bickle without a note]
      Mk. 12:15 (p. 214) - UPOKRISIN
      Mk. 12:30 (p. 215) – ISCOUS SOU
      Mk. 14:3 (p. 220) – PISTIKHS
      Mk. 14:3 (p. 220) – SINTRIASA TO ALABASTRON
      Mk. 14:6 (p. 220) – KOPOU PARHXETE
      Mk. 14:20 (p. 221) – TRUBLION
      Mk. 14:32 (p. 222) – KORISH (intending CWRION)
      Mk. 14:33 (p. 222) – EKTANBEISQAI (intending EKQAMBEISQAI)
      Mk. 14:44 (p. 223) - ASFALOS
      Mk. 14:51 (p. 223) – EPI GUMNOS

      [Portrait of Luke on p. 234]

      Lk. 1:2 (p. 244) – LITOPTAI (intending AUTOPTAI)
      Lk. 1:4 (p. 244) – KATHCHQHS
      Lk. 1:18 (p. 245) – PROBEBHKULIA
      Lk. 2:1 (p. 249) – DOGMA
      Lk. 2:8 (p. 249) – AGRAILOINQES (intending AGRAULOUNTES)
      Lk. 2:14 (p. 250) – EIDOKIAS (intending EUDOKIAS)
      Lk. 2:28 (p. 251) – EIS TAS ANIKALAS [The "L" is a Latin L, shaped like an English capital L.] (intending EIS TAS AGKALAS)
      Lk. 2:41 (p. 252) – KAT ETOS
      Lk. 3:22 (p. 255) – EUDOKESA
      Lk. 4:36 (p. 259) – QAMBOS
      Lk. 5:26 (p. 263) – EKTASIS (intending EKSTASIS)
      Lk. 6:23 (p. 266) – KAI SKIRTESATE
      Lk. 11:3 (p. 287) – TON EPIOUSION
      Lk. 11:53 (p. 292) – KAI EPISTOMATIZEIN (intending KAI APOSTOMATIZEIN)
      Lk. 12:29 (p. 294) – NETEWRIZESTEI (intending METEWRIZESQE)
      Lk. 23:33 (p. 334) – KAKOURGOUS
      Lk. 23:39 (p. 334) – KAKOURGWN

      [Portrait of John is on p. 344]

      Jn. 7:4 (p. 370) – EN PARRHSIA
      Jn. 11:14 (p. 386) – PARRHSIA
      Jn. 11:27 (p. 387) – ERCOMENOS
      Jn. 18:20 (p. 408) – PARRHSIA

      Now it occurs to me that with the exception of the four readings in John, most of these Greek words or phrases are words or phrases which occur only once in the books in which they appear. When I realized this, an idea popped into my head: what if some copyists placed the ".." mark and the trickle-mark alongside a line of text to alert the reader/copyist that a once-used word, or an otherwise (potentially) troublesome word, occurred in that line?

      It might be interesting to sift through Vaticanus to see how many lines that are accompanied by umlauts/bickles/distigmai (and, in the OT, trickles) contain words which occur in that book only once (or almost only once) or which are used in an unusual way.

      Yours in Christ,

      James Snapp, Jr.
    • Steven Avery
      Hi, Thanks, James. While you are discussing Greek variants in a Latin ms, there is another respected Latin ms (Vulgate of Theodulfe the scribe, with an epitaph
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 9, 2012
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        Hi,

        Thanks, James.  While you are discussing Greek variants in a Latin ms, there is another respected Latin ms (Vulgate of Theodulfe the scribe, with an epitaph of a respected Abbotm Ratoldus) in the same period that is famous for listing textual variants on the heavenly witnesses in Latin.  A little research might determine whether that manuscript has additional variants, especially in the epistles, and whether this is very relevant to your current studies.

        Remember that Vaticanus does have an umlaut that appears to be related to the 1 John 5:7 area and this shows early referencing with some awareness of variation.

        Histoire de la Vulgate pendant les premiers siècles du moyen âge 
        Samuel Berger
        http://books.google.com/books?id=HYQXAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA103
        p.103

        Manuscript 13174, (do not yet have the Beuron # from the Vetus Latina Institue,  however Berger gives us 3 ms identities).

        Numeros de 1677             -   23 (Corbie)
        Numeros de 1735-1741     -   669
        Numeros du Fonde Latin   -   13174

        Histoire de la Vulgate pendant les premiers siècles du moyen âge 
        Samuel Berger
        http://books.google.com/books?id=HYQXAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA103

        picture of much of the material from p.103-104
        Emacs!

        This is followed by Berger discussion of the "Augustine" material likely being from the Speculum, and that the Athanasius material is likely what we now refer to as Ps-Athanasius on the Trinity.  This may well be a well known evidence from the 5th century, from the same period where hundreds of bishops used the verse in their statement of faith to the Arians under Huneric, as a revelation "clearer than the light", "luce clarius unius divinitatis esse cum".  (remember that the next time you read that the verse was not used in the Arian controversies).

        Seven Books on the Trinity by the Pseudo-Vigilius of Thapsus
        http://books.google.com/books?id=gzdKAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA592
        http://m.ccel.org/ccel/wace/biodict.a.html?term=Eusebius,%20bp.%20of%20Vercellae

        Samuel Berger also discusses Cassiodorus and Fulgentius, whose material above is from Response to the Arians (also remember that the next time that you read from a Metzger parrot that the verse was not used in Arian controversies.)  If anyone gets a few more gems from the Berger French, please share away !

        Below Athanasius is using language similar to Pricillian. 
        Note that some references have the text with "Christo Jesu", rather than Jhesu.

        [A]ug[ustinus] :
        Quoniam tres sunt qui testimonium dicunt dicunt in terra, spiritus aqua et sanguis, et hi tres unum sunt in Christo Jhesu; et tres sunt qui testimonium dicunt in caelo, Pater Verbum et Spiritus, et hi tres unum sunt.

        Item :
        Hi sunt qui testificantur in caelo, Pater et Flllus et Spiritus sanctus, et hi tres unum sunt.

        Athanasius:
        Tres sunt qui testimonium dicunt in cielo, Pater et Verbum et Spiritus, et in Christo Jhesu unum sunt.

        Fulgentios :
        Tres sunt qui testimonium perhibent in caelo, Pater Verbum et Spiritus, et tres unum sunt.

        ===============================================

        In my last post, sent out in a rush yesterday morning (running both to a puter office need, we moved the mini, and then a little Sukkot fellowship):

        [textualcriticism] A new book on the Comma Johanneum
        Steven Avery - Oct 7, 2011
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/textualcriticism/message/7530

        a friend pointed out that I should have cleaned up the more silly part of google translate (google gave Party John rather than Comma Johanneum and the word cut instead of section or some similar English). A point well take for the future, especially since the section was reasonably short.

        ===============================================

        Shalom,
        Steven Avery
        Bayside, NY

        http://purebible.blogspot.com/
        http://www.purebibleforum.com/

        James Snapp
        An interesting Vulgate Gospels-MS produced c. 860 is featured at
        http://daten.digitale-sammlungen.de/~db/0004/bsb00047303/images/
        and at http://www.wdl.org/en/item/8921/ .

        As its brief profile states, "The marvelous manuscript, written during the episcopate of Anno of Freising (854-75), has in the margins of its leaves numerous critical notes on the text, including a series of Greek variants." In an earlier post I called this the Freising Gospels but there are at least two Vulgate Gospels-books associated with Freising so *a* Vulgate-Gospels produced at Freising might be a better name, or perhaps "Freising Gospels of the Slouching Evangelists." One thing special about it is that pages 53-56 are purple.

        Now about those marginal notes that mention Greek variants. I wouldn't call them variants (although in a few cases they do occur where a variant exists, such as at Luke 2:14). They are readings. They are typically accompanied by an umlaut (i.e., a distigma, like the ones in the margin of Vaticanus) or by a trickle (three points of a triangle without its edges); the top dot often is a short slash.

        Here they are:

        [If you have the PDF, you can jump to page 76 for the portrait of Matthew.]

        Mt. 5:25 (p. 86) – EUNOUN
        Mt. 6:7 (p. 89) – BATTOLOGECETE

        (snip more)

        Now it occurs to me that with the exception of the four readings in John, most of these Greek words or phrases are words or phrases which occur only once in the books in which they appear. When I realized this, an idea popped into my head: what if some copyists placed the ".." mark and the trickle-mark alongside a line of text to alert the reader/copyist that a once-used word, or an otherwise (potentially) troublesome word, occurred in that line?

        It might be interesting to sift through Vaticanus to see how many lines that are accompanied by umlauts/bickles/distigmai (and, in the OT, trickles) contain words which occur in that book only once (or almost only once) or which are used in an unusual way.
      • Daniel Buck
        If you re following the page numbers on the actual codex, they begin 95 pages later than as numbered below.   Daniel Buck ________________________________
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 9, 2012
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          If you're following the page numbers on the actual codex, they begin 95 pages later than as numbered below.
           
          Daniel Buck

          From: Vox Verax <james.snapp@...> 
           


          [If you have the PDF, you can jump to page 76 for the portrait of Matthew.]

          Mt. 5:25 (p. 86) – EUNOUN
          Mt. 6:7 (p. 89) – BATTOLOGECETE
          Mt. 6:11 (p. 89) – EPIOSION
          Mt. 6:20 (p. 90) – AFANIZEI
          Mt. 8:3 (p. 95) – KAQARISENTI (intending KAQARISQHTI)
          Mt. 13:38 (p. 116) – TOU PONHROU
          Mt. 17:5 (p. 126) – HUDOKHSA (intending EUDOKHSA)
          Mt. 18:8 (p. 131) – KULLON
          Mt. 24:17 (p. 152) – EPI TOU DWMATOS
          Mt. 26:74 (p. 164) - KATAQHMATIZEIN

          [Mark Portrait on p. 174. (Who knew Mark had a taste for chili-pepper?)]

          Mk. 1:11 (p. 179) – EUDOKHSA
          Mk. 2:19 (p. 183) – NUMFWNOS
          Mk. 2:21 (p. 183) – ENIBHMA (intending EPIBLHMA)
          Mk. 2:21 (p. 183) – PLHRWMA
          Mk. 3:10 (p. 184) – MASTIGAS
          Mk. 7:3 (p. 196) – NUKNH (intending PUKNA?)
          Mk. 7:34 (p. 199) – DIANOCQHTI
          Mk. 9:20 (p. 204) – ESPARAZEN
          Mk. 10:17 (p. 207) – KLHRONOMHSW
          [208 (last line) – bickle without a note]
          Mk. 12:15 (p. 214) - UPOKRISIN
          Mk. 12:30 (p. 215) – ISCOUS SOU
          Mk. 14:3 (p. 220) – PISTIKHS
          Mk. 14:3 (p. 220) – SINTRIASA TO ALABASTRON
          Mk. 14:6 (p. 220) – KOPOU PARHXETE
          Mk. 14:20 (p. 221) – TRUBLION
          Mk. 14:32 (p. 222) – KORISH (intending CWRION)
          Mk. 14:33 (p. 222) – EKTANBEISQAI (intending EKQAMBEISQAI)
          Mk. 14:44 (p. 223) - ASFALOS
          Mk. 14:51 (p. 223) – EPI GUMNOS

          [Portrait of Luke on p. 234]

          Lk. 1:2 (p. 244) – LITOPTAI (intending AUTOPTAI)
          Lk. 1:4 (p. 244) – KATHCHQHS
          Lk. 1:18 (p. 245) – PROBEBHKULIA
          Lk. 2:1 (p. 249) – DOGMA
          Lk. 2:8 (p. 249) – AGRAILOINQES (intending AGRAULOUNTES)
          Lk. 2:14 (p. 250) – EIDOKIAS (intending EUDOKIAS)
          Lk. 2:28 (p. 251) – EIS TAS ANIKALAS [The "L" is a Latin L, shaped like an English capital L.] (intending EIS TAS AGKALAS)
          Lk. 2:41 (p. 252) – KAT ETOS
          Lk. 3:22 (p. 255) – EUDOKESA
          Lk. 4:36 (p. 259) – QAMBOS
          Lk. 5:26 (p. 263) – EKTASIS (intending EKSTASIS)
          Lk. 6:23 (p. 266) – KAI SKIRTESATE
          Lk. 11:3 (p. 287) – TON EPIOUSION
          Lk. 11:53 (p. 292) – KAI EPISTOMATIZEIN (intending KAI APOSTOMATIZEIN)
          Lk. 12:29 (p. 294) – NETEWRIZESTEI (intending METEWRIZESQE)
          Lk. 23:33 (p. 334) – KAKOURGOUS
          Lk. 23:39 (p. 334) – KAKOURGWN

          [Portrait of John is on p. 344]

          Jn. 7:4 (p. 370) – EN PARRHSIA
          Jn. 11:14 (p. 386) – PARRHSIA
          Jn. 11:27 (p. 387) – ERCOMENOS
          Jn. 18:20 (p. 408) – PARRHSIA

          Now it occurs to me that with the exception of the four readings in John, most of these Greek words or phrases are words or phrases which occur only once in the books in which they appear. When I realized this, an idea popped into my head: what if some copyists placed the ".." mark and the trickle-mark alongside a line of text to alert the reader/copyist that a once-used word, or an otherwise (potentially) troublesome word, occurred in that line?

          It might be interesting to sift through Vaticanus to see how many lines that are accompanied by umlauts/bickles/distigmai (and, in the OT, trickles) contain words which occur in that book only once (or almost only once) or which are used in an unusual way.

          Yours in Christ,

          James Snapp, Jr.



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