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Re: [textualcriticism] General Question: Synaxarion

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  • robert robinson
    If a N.T. manuscript contains the complete, continuous text  of only the four Gospels, it is usually called an Evangelion, Tetraevangelion or
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 12, 2012
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      "If a N.T. manuscript contains the complete, continuous text  of only the four Gospels, it is usually called an Evangelion, Tetraevangelion or Evangelistarion. More specifically, the Evangelion is an anthology of passages from the four Gospels, which the priest reads in church, while the Evangelistarion contains the continuous text.
      If the book contains only the Acts and the Epistles of the Apostles and Revelation it is called a Praxapostolos or Apostolos. More specifically, the Apostolos contains lectionary selections from Acts and the twenty one Epistles." Dr. Constantine Siamakis, 'Transmission of the text of the Holy Bible.' 28-34.


      From: Vox Verax <james.snapp@...>
      To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, July 9, 2012 8:44 PM
      Subject: [textualcriticism] General Question: Synaxarion

       
      Here's what I suspect will be an easy question for somebody: what is the technical term for a list of lections from the Gospels in which only the incipit and explicit (the opening and closing phrases) of the passages are given?

      Manuscript 652 has this sort of list (written in a sort of late uncial or semi-uncial handwriting) in its opening pages, after the Eusebian Sections and before the chapter-list for Matthew. (On page 18/Image 370 there's a margin-note that seems to refer to the feast-day for Gregory the Wonder-worker.) (The Heothina-list begins on Image 460.) Should it be called a "lection-table," "lection-list," "Synaxarion-list," "Synaxarion-table," or is there some other term for it (when only readings from the Gospels are in view)?

      Yours in Christ,

      James Snapp, Jr.



    • Vox Verax
      So far it looks like there is no term for the list of daily readings tha presents only the first and last phrases for each lection for each day. Any
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 13, 2012
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        So far it looks like there is no term for the list of daily readings tha presents only the first and last phrases for each lection for each day. Any objections if we call it a Lection-Calendar (or, Lection-Calendar plus the Eleven Heothina)?

        Yours in Christ,

        James Snapp, Jr.
      • jonathancborland
        Jim, I misread your question. How about the Lectionary incipit and explicit ? Sincerely, Jonathan
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 14, 2012
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          Jim,

          I misread your question. How about the "Lectionary incipit and explicit"?

          Sincerely,

          Jonathan


          --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "Vox Verax" <james.snapp@...> wrote:
          >
          > So far it looks like there is no term for the list of daily readings tha presents only the first and last phrases for each lection for each day. Any objections if we call it a Lection-Calendar (or, Lection-Calendar plus the Eleven Heothina)?
          >
          > Yours in Christ,
          >
          > James Snapp, Jr.
          >
        • Vox Verax
          Jonathan, That might work -- but I think Lection-Calendar works better, since the list includes the dates for each lection. Also, Lectionary incipit and
          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 15, 2012
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            Jonathan,

            That might work -- but I think "Lection-Calendar" works better, since the list includes the dates for each lection. Also, "Lectionary incipit and explicit" might cause confusion between the incipit-phrases (special introductory phrases to begin the lection in the church-service) and the opening phrases of the lections as they exist in the continuous-text MS.

            Yours in Christ,

            James Snapp, Jr.

            --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "jonathancborland" <nihao@...> wrote:
            >
            > Jim,
            >
            > I misread your question. How about the "Lectionary incipit and explicit"?
            >
            > Sincerely,
            >
            > Jonathan
          • spuluka
            ... In modern publications for liturgical reference such lists are labeled simply Lectionary . If you want to qualify the work for this purpose I would use
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 15, 2012
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              --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "Vox Verax" <james.snapp@...> wrote:
              >
              > Jonathan,
              >
              > That might work -- but I think "Lection-Calendar" works better, since the list includes the dates for each lection.

              In modern publications for liturgical reference such lists are labeled simply "Lectionary". If you want to qualify the work for this purpose I would use "Lectionary List".

              Of course we now have the benefit of chapter and verse designations that make the listing simpler. But there are still occasions where one has to say things like "first half" or "second half" of a verse to correctly designate the open or close of a pericope.

              I don't like using calendar because in liturgical usage this tends to imply only the fixed cycle of the menaion. But perhaps your this list does only include such dates and nothing from the Paschal based cycle.

              Steve Puluka
              MA, Theology Duquesne University
              Cantor Holy Ghost Church
              Carpatho-Rusyn tradition
              Mckees Rocks, PA
              http://puluka.com
            • TeunisV
              Again: Gregory: http://www.archive.org/stream/p1novumtestamentum03tiscuoft#page/162/mode/2up Also p. 343. So: lectionary tables (tabulae) for the moveable
              Message 6 of 11 , Jul 15, 2012
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                Again: Gregory:
                http://www.archive.org/stream/p1novumtestamentum03tiscuoft#page/162/mode/2up
                Also p. 343.
                So: "lectionary tables" (tabulae) for the moveable and fixed year.
                In lists of syn and men can be references to Eusebian canones, to anagnosmata numerata (Gregory: anagn.) and to more: to incipits/explicits, for example.

                Om ms 652:
                http://www.archive.org/stream/novumtestamentu00abbogoog#page/n132/mode/2up



                Teunis van Lopik


                --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "spuluka" <spuluka@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "Vox Verax" <james.snapp@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Jonathan,
                > >
                > > That might work -- but I think "Lection-Calendar" works better, since the list includes the dates for each lection.
                >
                > In modern publications for liturgical reference such lists are labeled simply "Lectionary". If you want to qualify the work for this purpose I would use "Lectionary List".
                >
                > Of course we now have the benefit of chapter and verse designations that make the listing simpler. But there are still occasions where one has to say things like "first half" or "second half" of a verse to correctly designate the open or close of a pericope.
                >
                > I don't like using calendar because in liturgical usage this tends to imply only the fixed cycle of the menaion. But perhaps your this list does only include such dates and nothing from the Paschal based cycle.
                >
                > Steve Puluka
                > MA, Theology Duquesne University
                > Cantor Holy Ghost Church
                > Carpatho-Rusyn tradition
                > Mckees Rocks, PA
                > http://puluka.com
                >
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