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[textualcriticism] Doctrinal Implications of a Patristic Citation on the Masoretic Minus in Proverbs 18:22

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  • Daniel Buck
    He who finds a wife finds a good thing, and obtains favor from YHWH. Proverbs 18:22, following the short ending of the Masoretic Text. The lxx adds a
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 10, 2012
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      "He who finds a wife finds a good thing, and obtains favor from YHWH." Proverbs 18:22, following the short ending of the Masoretic Text.

      "The lxx adds a distich to Proverbs 18:22, "He that putteth away a good wife putteth away happiness; and he that keepeth an adulteress, is foolish and ungodly." He who constructed this proverb [added by the lxx] has been guided by מצא to מוציא (Ezra 10:3); elsewhere ἐκβάλλειν (γυναῖκα), Galatians 4:30, Sir. 28:15, is the translation of גּרשׁ. The Syr. has adopted the half of that distich, and Jerome the whole of it. On the other hand, Proverbs 18:23, Proverbs 18:24, and Proverbs 19:1-2, are wanting in the lxx. The translation which is found in some Codd. is that of Theodotion (vid., Lagarde)." --Keil and Delitzsch

      "None of the versions, except the Chaldee, are pleased with the naked simplicity of the Hebrew text, hence they all add good: "He that findeth a Good wife findeth a good thing;" and most people, who have not deeply considered the subject, think the assertion, without this qualification, is absurd. Some copies of the Targum, and apparently one of Kennicott's MSS., have the addition טובה tobah, good; but this would be an authority too slender to justify changing the Hebrew text; yet Houbigant, Kennicott, and other able critics argue for it. The Septuagint is not satisfied without an addition: "But he who puts away a good wife, puts away a good thing: and he that retains an adulteress, is a fool and wicked." In this addition the Vulgate, Syriac, and Arabic, agree with the Septuagint."  --Clarke


      I ran across a patristic citation that (no surprise) supports the expanded reading, which is, according to the agreement of the above critics, at least the reading of the LXX and the Vulgate. It's in the Apostolic Constitutions 7.456, and given in support of the patristic doctrine on divorce.

      This is yet another case in which a not-so-minor Bible doctrine hinges on textual criticism. Throw out the long ending of Proverbs 18:22, and you throw out the doctrine that an adulterous wife must be put away.

      Come to think of it, I guess that's exactly what happened.

       
      Daniel Buck


    • James Miller
      Kevin: The terminology in question has differing referents depending on whether it is used within the context of NT studies, on the one hand, or Eastern
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 10, 2012
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        Kevin:

        The terminology in question has differing referents depending on whether it is used within the context of NT studies, on the one hand, or Eastern Orthodox worship/praxis, on the other. Your definition holds for the latter, but in the area of NT studies "Synaxarion" connotes a type of Gospel lectionary manuscript. Surprisingly, the term "menologion" likewise has quite different meanings in the realms of NT studies and Eastern Orthodox worship/praxis, respectively.

        If you look in the archives of this list, you'll see that some years ago I posted an inquiry about this very topic: I was surprised and a bit taken aback at that time to learn of this NT-studies use of the terms in question.

        James

        --- On Tue, 7/10/12, Kevin Edgecomb <kevin@...> wrote:

        From: Kevin Edgecomb <kevin@...>
        Subject: Re: [textualcriticism] General Question: Synaxarion
        To: "textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com" <textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com>
        Cc: "textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com" <textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com>
        Date: Tuesday, July 10, 2012, 11:34 AM

        The Synaxarion contains hymnography and lives of Saints, with no Biblical readings. "Synaxarion-list" and "Synaxarion-table" would be inappropriate. 
        But I'm not sure what the proper term for a list of incipits/explicits would be. Surely there's a term. Perhaps "incipit/explicit lectionary list" is best, as it's clear, though wordy.

        My regards,Kevin P. Edgecomb
        Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of TheologyBrookline, Massachusetts

        Sent from my iPhone
        On Jul 9, 2012, at 11:44 PM, "Vox Verax" <james.snapp@...> wrote:

        Here's what I suspect will be an easy question for somebody: what is the technical term for a list of lections from the Gospels in which only the incipit and explicit (the opening and closing phrases) of the passages are given?

        Manuscript 652 has this sort of list (written in a sort of late uncial or semi-uncial handwriting) in its opening pages, after the Eusebian Sections and before the chapter-list for Matthew. (On page 18/Image 370 there's a margin-note that seems to refer to the feast-day for Gregory the Wonder-worker.) (The Heothina-list begins on Image 460.) Should it be called a "lection-table," "lection-list," "Synaxarion-list," "Synaxarion-table," or is there some other term for it (when only readings from the Gospels are in view)?

        Yours in Christ,

        James Snapp, Jr.
      • TeunisV
        David Parker in his Introduction ... , p. 56: ... the Orthodox lectionary. The sequences are two: the synaxarion (which follows the Church s year, beginning
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 11, 2012
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          David Parker in his "Introduction ...", p. 56:
          ""... the Orthodox lectionary. The sequences are two: the synaxarion (which follows the Church's year, beginning at Easter) and the menologion (which follows the civil calendar of the Byzantine Empire and starts on 1 September).""
          This is common sense in NT textual criticism. See the literature on p. 57.
          So did Gregory and many others before and next.

          Teunis van Lopik


          --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, James Miller <jamtata@...> wrote:
          >
          > Kevin:
          >
          > The terminology in question has differing referents depending on whether it is used within the context of NT studies, on the one hand, or Eastern Orthodox worship/praxis, on the other. Your definition holds for the latter, but in the area of NT studies "Synaxarion" connotes a type of Gospel lectionary manuscript. Surprisingly, the term "menologion" likewise has quite different meanings in the realms of NT studies and Eastern Orthodox worship/praxis, respectively.
          >
          > If you look in the archives of this list, you'll see that some years ago I posted an inquiry about this very topic: I was surprised and a bit taken aback at that time to learn of this NT-studies use of the terms in question.
          >
          > James
          >
          > --- On Tue, 7/10/12, Kevin Edgecomb <kevin@...> wrote:
          >
          > From: Kevin Edgecomb <kevin@...>
          > Subject: Re: [textualcriticism] General Question: Synaxarion
          > To: "textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com" <textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com>
          > Cc: "textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com" <textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com>
          > Date: Tuesday, July 10, 2012, 11:34 AM
          >
          > The Synaxarion contains hymnography and lives of Saints, with no Biblical readings. "Synaxarion-list" and "Synaxarion-table" would be inappropriate. 
          > But I'm not sure what the proper term for a list of incipits/explicits would be. Surely there's a term. Perhaps "incipit/explicit lectionary list" is best, as it's clear, though wordy.
          >
          > My regards,Kevin P. Edgecomb
          > Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of TheologyBrookline, Massachusetts
          >
          > Sent from my iPhone
          > On Jul 9, 2012, at 11:44 PM, "Vox Verax" <james.snapp@...> wrote:
          >
          > Here's what I suspect will be an easy question for somebody: what is the technical term for a list of lections from the Gospels in which only the incipit and explicit (the opening and closing phrases) of the passages are given?
          >
          > Manuscript 652 has this sort of list (written in a sort of late uncial or semi-uncial handwriting) in its opening pages, after the Eusebian Sections and before the chapter-list for Matthew. (On page 18/Image 370 there's a margin-note that seems to refer to the feast-day for Gregory the Wonder-worker.) (The Heothina-list begins on Image 460.) Should it be called a "lection-table," "lection-list," "Synaxarion-list," "Synaxarion-table," or is there some other term for it (when only readings from the Gospels are in view)?
          >
          > Yours in Christ,
          >
          > James Snapp, Jr.
          >
        • robert robinson
          If a N.T. manuscript contains the complete, continuous text  of only the four Gospels, it is usually called an Evangelion, Tetraevangelion or
          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 12, 2012
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            "If a N.T. manuscript contains the complete, continuous text  of only the four Gospels, it is usually called an Evangelion, Tetraevangelion or Evangelistarion. More specifically, the Evangelion is an anthology of passages from the four Gospels, which the priest reads in church, while the Evangelistarion contains the continuous text.
            If the book contains only the Acts and the Epistles of the Apostles and Revelation it is called a Praxapostolos or Apostolos. More specifically, the Apostolos contains lectionary selections from Acts and the twenty one Epistles." Dr. Constantine Siamakis, 'Transmission of the text of the Holy Bible.' 28-34.


            From: Vox Verax <james.snapp@...>
            To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, July 9, 2012 8:44 PM
            Subject: [textualcriticism] General Question: Synaxarion

             
            Here's what I suspect will be an easy question for somebody: what is the technical term for a list of lections from the Gospels in which only the incipit and explicit (the opening and closing phrases) of the passages are given?

            Manuscript 652 has this sort of list (written in a sort of late uncial or semi-uncial handwriting) in its opening pages, after the Eusebian Sections and before the chapter-list for Matthew. (On page 18/Image 370 there's a margin-note that seems to refer to the feast-day for Gregory the Wonder-worker.) (The Heothina-list begins on Image 460.) Should it be called a "lection-table," "lection-list," "Synaxarion-list," "Synaxarion-table," or is there some other term for it (when only readings from the Gospels are in view)?

            Yours in Christ,

            James Snapp, Jr.



          • Vox Verax
            So far it looks like there is no term for the list of daily readings tha presents only the first and last phrases for each lection for each day. Any
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 13, 2012
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              So far it looks like there is no term for the list of daily readings tha presents only the first and last phrases for each lection for each day. Any objections if we call it a Lection-Calendar (or, Lection-Calendar plus the Eleven Heothina)?

              Yours in Christ,

              James Snapp, Jr.
            • jonathancborland
              Jim, I misread your question. How about the Lectionary incipit and explicit ? Sincerely, Jonathan
              Message 6 of 11 , Jul 14, 2012
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                Jim,

                I misread your question. How about the "Lectionary incipit and explicit"?

                Sincerely,

                Jonathan


                --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "Vox Verax" <james.snapp@...> wrote:
                >
                > So far it looks like there is no term for the list of daily readings tha presents only the first and last phrases for each lection for each day. Any objections if we call it a Lection-Calendar (or, Lection-Calendar plus the Eleven Heothina)?
                >
                > Yours in Christ,
                >
                > James Snapp, Jr.
                >
              • Vox Verax
                Jonathan, That might work -- but I think Lection-Calendar works better, since the list includes the dates for each lection. Also, Lectionary incipit and
                Message 7 of 11 , Jul 15, 2012
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                  Jonathan,

                  That might work -- but I think "Lection-Calendar" works better, since the list includes the dates for each lection. Also, "Lectionary incipit and explicit" might cause confusion between the incipit-phrases (special introductory phrases to begin the lection in the church-service) and the opening phrases of the lections as they exist in the continuous-text MS.

                  Yours in Christ,

                  James Snapp, Jr.

                  --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "jonathancborland" <nihao@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Jim,
                  >
                  > I misread your question. How about the "Lectionary incipit and explicit"?
                  >
                  > Sincerely,
                  >
                  > Jonathan
                • spuluka
                  ... In modern publications for liturgical reference such lists are labeled simply Lectionary . If you want to qualify the work for this purpose I would use
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jul 15, 2012
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                    --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "Vox Verax" <james.snapp@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Jonathan,
                    >
                    > That might work -- but I think "Lection-Calendar" works better, since the list includes the dates for each lection.

                    In modern publications for liturgical reference such lists are labeled simply "Lectionary". If you want to qualify the work for this purpose I would use "Lectionary List".

                    Of course we now have the benefit of chapter and verse designations that make the listing simpler. But there are still occasions where one has to say things like "first half" or "second half" of a verse to correctly designate the open or close of a pericope.

                    I don't like using calendar because in liturgical usage this tends to imply only the fixed cycle of the menaion. But perhaps your this list does only include such dates and nothing from the Paschal based cycle.

                    Steve Puluka
                    MA, Theology Duquesne University
                    Cantor Holy Ghost Church
                    Carpatho-Rusyn tradition
                    Mckees Rocks, PA
                    http://puluka.com
                  • TeunisV
                    Again: Gregory: http://www.archive.org/stream/p1novumtestamentum03tiscuoft#page/162/mode/2up Also p. 343. So: lectionary tables (tabulae) for the moveable
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jul 15, 2012
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                      Again: Gregory:
                      http://www.archive.org/stream/p1novumtestamentum03tiscuoft#page/162/mode/2up
                      Also p. 343.
                      So: "lectionary tables" (tabulae) for the moveable and fixed year.
                      In lists of syn and men can be references to Eusebian canones, to anagnosmata numerata (Gregory: anagn.) and to more: to incipits/explicits, for example.

                      Om ms 652:
                      http://www.archive.org/stream/novumtestamentu00abbogoog#page/n132/mode/2up



                      Teunis van Lopik


                      --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "spuluka" <spuluka@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "Vox Verax" <james.snapp@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Jonathan,
                      > >
                      > > That might work -- but I think "Lection-Calendar" works better, since the list includes the dates for each lection.
                      >
                      > In modern publications for liturgical reference such lists are labeled simply "Lectionary". If you want to qualify the work for this purpose I would use "Lectionary List".
                      >
                      > Of course we now have the benefit of chapter and verse designations that make the listing simpler. But there are still occasions where one has to say things like "first half" or "second half" of a verse to correctly designate the open or close of a pericope.
                      >
                      > I don't like using calendar because in liturgical usage this tends to imply only the fixed cycle of the menaion. But perhaps your this list does only include such dates and nothing from the Paschal based cycle.
                      >
                      > Steve Puluka
                      > MA, Theology Duquesne University
                      > Cantor Holy Ghost Church
                      > Carpatho-Rusyn tradition
                      > Mckees Rocks, PA
                      > http://puluka.com
                      >
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