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Teaching them about the Kingdom of God in the Latin of Matthew 21:17

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  • sarban
    A number of Latin manuscripts have docebat eos de regno dei. added to the end of Matthew 21:17 Does anyone know the origin of this reading ? Andrew Criddle
    Message 1 of 13 , Jun 18, 2012
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      A number of Latin manuscripts have docebat eos de regno dei. added to the end of Matthew 21:17
      Does anyone know the origin of this reading ?
       
      Andrew Criddle
    • Wieland Willker
      On this
      Message 2 of 13 , Jun 19, 2012
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        On this website one finds:

         

        “The final clause is not found in the Greek or the Vulgate, but it is in Gregorian chant and thence it entered this lection in some medieval missals”

         

        The footnote adds:

        The composers of Gregorian chant would sometimes combine texts from various scriptures to form a new, coherent chant. Thus the words of Esther, Job, Sarah, and Judith were combined, and so were the words of Susanna, Isaiah, and Paul: Catherine Brown Tkacz, "Singing Women's Words as Sacramental Mimesis," Recherches de Theologie et Philosophie medievales 52.2 (2003): 275-328 at pp. 306 and 311-13. In the same way, it appears that certain chants combined elements from the Matthew lection of interest here with echoes of Luke 9:11, and this led to the Lukan clause actually appearing sometimes in the lection itself.”

         

        Best wishes

            Wieland

            <><

        --------------------------

        Wieland Willker, Bremen, Germany

        http://www-user.uni-bremen.de/~wie

        Textcritical commentary:

        http://www-user.uni-bremen.de/~wie/TCG/

         

        Please check out the TC forum:

        http://tcg.iphpbb3.com

         

         

         

         

        From: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com [mailto:textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of sarban
        Sent: Monday, June 18, 2012 8:47 PM
        To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [textualcriticism] Teaching them about the Kingdom of God in the Latin of Matthew 21:17

         




        A number of Latin manuscripts have docebat eos de regno dei. added to the end of Matthew 21:17

        Does anyone know the origin of this reading ?

         

        Andrew Criddle




      • TeunisV
        Tischendorf s Ed. 8 major apparatus ad loc and Wordsworth/White Vulgat major ad loc refer to use in (Latin) churches too. Teunis van Lopik
        Message 3 of 13 , Jun 19, 2012
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          Tischendorf's Ed. 8 major apparatus ad loc
          and
          Wordsworth/White Vulgat major ad loc
          refer to use in (Latin) churches too.
          Teunis van Lopik

          --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "Wieland Willker" <wie@...> wrote:
          >
          > On
          > <http://www.gonzaga.edu/Academics/Libraries/Foley-Library/Departments/Specia
          > l-Collections/Collections/rare-book-collection/DominicanMissal1521.asp> this
          > website one finds:
          >
          >
          >
          > "The final clause is not found in the Greek or the Vulgate, but it is in
          > Gregorian chant and thence it entered this lection in some medieval missals"
          >
          >
          >
          > The footnote adds:
          >
          > "The composers of Gregorian chant would sometimes combine texts from various
          > scriptures to form a new, coherent chant. Thus the words of Esther, Job,
          > Sarah, and Judith were combined, and so were the words of Susanna, Isaiah,
          > and Paul: Catherine Brown Tkacz, "Singing Women's Words as Sacramental
          > Mimesis," Recherches de Theologie et Philosophie medievales 52.2 (2003):
          > 275-328 at pp. 306 and 311-13. In the same way, it appears that certain
          > chants combined elements from the Matthew lection of interest here with
          > echoes of Luke 9:11, and this led to the Lukan clause actually appearing
          > sometimes in the lection itself."
          >
          >
          >
          > Best wishes
          >
          > Wieland
          >
          > <><
          >
          > --------------------------
          >
          > Wieland Willker, Bremen, Germany
          >
          > http://www-user.uni-bremen.de/~wie
          >
          > Textcritical commentary:
          >
          > http://www-user.uni-bremen.de/~wie/TCG/
          >
          >
          >
          > Please check out the TC forum:
          >
          > http://tcg.iphpbb3.com
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > From: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
          > [mailto:textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of sarban
          > Sent: Monday, June 18, 2012 8:47 PM
          > To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [textualcriticism] Teaching them about the Kingdom of God in the
          > Latin of Matthew 21:17
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > A number of Latin manuscripts have docebat eos de regno dei. added to the
          > end of Matthew 21:17
          >
          > Does anyone know the origin of this reading ?
          >
          >
          >
          > Andrew Criddle
          >
        • TeunisV
          Tischendorf borrowed from Griesbach and the latter from Mill. Franciscus Lucas already in 1606, Notarum ad varias lectiones in quatuor Euangeliis: Quod quaedam
          Message 4 of 13 , Jun 19, 2012
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            Tischendorf borrowed from Griesbach and the latter from Mill.
            Franciscus Lucas already in 1606, Notarum ad varias lectiones in quatuor Euangeliis: Quod quaedam manuscripta addunt, Et docebat eos de regno Dei, Epanorthotes ex ecclesiastico officio acceptum notat.

            Epanorthotes = Correctoria

            Teunis van Lopik

            --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "TeunisV" <tvanlopik@...> wrote:
            >
            > Tischendorf's Ed. 8 major apparatus ad loc
            > and
            > Wordsworth/White Vulgat major ad loc
            > refer to use in (Latin) churches too.
            > Teunis van Lopik
            >
            > --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "Wieland Willker" <wie@> wrote:
            > >
            > > On
            > > <http://www.gonzaga.edu/Academics/Libraries/Foley-Library/Departments/Specia
            > > l-Collections/Collections/rare-book-collection/DominicanMissal1521.asp> this
            > > website one finds:
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > "The final clause is not found in the Greek or the Vulgate, but it is in
            > > Gregorian chant and thence it entered this lection in some medieval missals"
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > The footnote adds:
            > >
            > > "The composers of Gregorian chant would sometimes combine texts from various
            > > scriptures to form a new, coherent chant. Thus the words of Esther, Job,
            > > Sarah, and Judith were combined, and so were the words of Susanna, Isaiah,
            > > and Paul: Catherine Brown Tkacz, "Singing Women's Words as Sacramental
            > > Mimesis," Recherches de Theologie et Philosophie medievales 52.2 (2003):
            > > 275-328 at pp. 306 and 311-13. In the same way, it appears that certain
            > > chants combined elements from the Matthew lection of interest here with
            > > echoes of Luke 9:11, and this led to the Lukan clause actually appearing
            > > sometimes in the lection itself."
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Best wishes
            > >
            > > Wieland
            > >
            > > <><
            > >
            > > --------------------------
            > >
            > > Wieland Willker, Bremen, Germany
            > >
            > > http://www-user.uni-bremen.de/~wie
            > >
            > > Textcritical commentary:
            > >
            > > http://www-user.uni-bremen.de/~wie/TCG/
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Please check out the TC forum:
            > >
            > > http://tcg.iphpbb3.com
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > From: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
            > > [mailto:textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of sarban
            > > Sent: Monday, June 18, 2012 8:47 PM
            > > To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
            > > Subject: [textualcriticism] Teaching them about the Kingdom of God in the
            > > Latin of Matthew 21:17
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > A number of Latin manuscripts have docebat eos de regno dei. added to the
            > > end of Matthew 21:17
            > >
            > > Does anyone know the origin of this reading ?
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Andrew Criddle
            > >
            >
          • robert robinson
            here is what Adam clarke wrote about the verse    Verse 17.  And he left them (katalipwn, finally leaving them) and went-into Bethany; and he lodged
            Message 5 of 13 , Jun 19, 2012
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              here is what Adam clarke wrote about the verse  
                Verse 17. "And he left them (katalipwn, finally leaving them) and went-into Bethany; and he lodged there." - Bethany was a village about two miles distant from Jerusalem, by Mount Olivet, John xi. 18; and it is remarkable that from this day till his death, which happened about six days after, he spent not one night in Jerusalem, but went every evening to Bethany, and returned to the city each morning. See Luke xxi. 37; xxii. 39;John viii. 1, 2. They were about to murder the Lord of glory; and the true light, which they had rejected, is now departing from them.
              "Lodged there." - Not merely to avoid the snares laid for him by those bad men, but to take away all suspicion of his affecting the regal power. To the end of this verse is added by the Saxon, . And taught them of the kingdom of God. This same reading is found in some MSS., Missals, and one copy of the Itala. It appears also in Wickliff, and my old folio English MS. Bible, and taugt hem of the kyngdom of God; and in two MS. copies of the Vulgate, in my possession: one, duodecimo, very fairly written, in 1300; the other a large folio, probably written in the 11th or 12th century, in which the words are, IBIQUE docebat eos de regno Dei. AND THERE he taught them concerning the kingdom of God.


              From: Wieland Willker <wie@...>
              To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tuesday, June 19, 2012 3:48 AM
              Subject: RE: [textualcriticism] Teaching them about the Kingdom of God in the Latin of Matthew 21:17

               
              On this website one finds:
               
              “The final clause is not found in the Greek or the Vulgate, but it is in Gregorian chant and thence it entered this lection in some medieval missals”
               
              The footnote adds:
              The composers of Gregorian chant would sometimes combine texts from various scriptures to form a new, coherent chant. Thus the words of Esther, Job, Sarah, and Judith were combined, and so were the words of Susanna, Isaiah, and Paul: Catherine Brown Tkacz, "Singing Women's Words as Sacramental Mimesis," Recherches de Theologie et Philosophie medievales 52.2 (2003): 275-328 at pp. 306 and 311-13. In the same way, it appears that certain chants combined elements from the Matthew lection of interest here with echoes of Luke 9:11, and this led to the Lukan clause actually appearing sometimes in the lection itself.”
               
              Best wishes
                  Wieland
                  <><
              --------------------------
              Wieland Willker, Bremen, Germany
              http://www-user.uni-bremen.de/~wie
              Textcritical commentary:
              http://www-user.uni-bremen.de/~wie/TCG/
               
              Please check out the TC forum:
              http://tcg.iphpbb3.com
               
               
               
               
              From: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com [mailto:textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of sarban
              Sent: Monday, June 18, 2012 8:47 PM
              To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [textualcriticism] Teaching them about the Kingdom of God in the Latin of Matthew 21:17
               



              A number of Latin manuscripts have docebat eos de regno dei. added to the end of Matthew 21:17
              Does anyone know the origin of this reading ?
               
              Andrew Criddle





            • jovial@comcast.net
              I can t help but wonder if docebat eos de regno dei isn t an alternate interpretation of Matt 21:18 from a Hebrew source text ior polyglot correction that
              Message 6 of 13 , Jun 19, 2012
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                I can't help but wonder if "docebat eos de regno dei" isn't an alternate interpretation of Matt 21:18 from a Hebrew source text ior polyglot correction that propogated to a Latin only text.  OK....maybe it is a wild addition.  But maybe it came from this....

                 

                Matt 21:18 could be written in Hebrew as ישוב בבקר אל עיר " = "he returned in the morning unto the city..."  Suppose for a moment that someone read the first 3 words as "ישוב בקרא אל" or "ישבו בקרא אל", interpretted it as "And he taught by calling out [about the kingdom of] God".  There's some verbage missing for that interpretation and they would have gotten a bit addative in the Latin, but with "ישב" and "אל" having mutiple readings that would both fit 21:18 and the 21:17b Latin addition, I have to wonder.  They missed out on thoroughness if that's where this came from.  But sloppier things have happened.

                 

                OK, maybe it got in there for another reason, but I just thought this was worth mentioning.  Maybe there's another explanation.  We've all seen wilder additions than this.

                 

                 


                 

              • TeunisV
                ... Have in mind that Lucas used Zegerus Epanorthotes, 1555=1553: http://books.google.nl/books?id=L1RJAAAAcAAJ&hl=nl&source=gbs_similarbooks
                Message 7 of 13 , Jun 19, 2012
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                  >Epanorthotes<
                  Have in mind that Lucas used Zegerus' Epanorthotes, 1555=1553:
                  http://books.google.nl/books?id=L1RJAAAAcAAJ&hl=nl&source=gbs_similarbooks


                  --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "TeunisV" <tvanlopik@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Tischendorf borrowed from Griesbach and the latter from Mill.
                  > Franciscus Lucas already in 1606, Notarum ad varias lectiones in quatuor Euangeliis: Quod quaedam manuscripta addunt, Et docebat eos de regno Dei, Epanorthotes ex ecclesiastico officio acceptum notat.
                  >
                  > Epanorthotes = Correctoria
                  >
                  > Teunis van Lopik
                  >
                  > --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "TeunisV" <tvanlopik@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Tischendorf's Ed. 8 major apparatus ad loc
                  > > and
                  > > Wordsworth/White Vulgat major ad loc
                  > > refer to use in (Latin) churches too.
                  > > Teunis van Lopik
                  > >
                  > > --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, "Wieland Willker" <wie@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > On
                  > > > <http://www.gonzaga.edu/Academics/Libraries/Foley-Library/Departments/Specia
                  > > > l-Collections/Collections/rare-book-collection/DominicanMissal1521.asp> this
                  > > > website one finds:
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > "The final clause is not found in the Greek or the Vulgate, but it is in
                  > > > Gregorian chant and thence it entered this lection in some medieval missals"
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > The footnote adds:
                  > > >
                  > > > "The composers of Gregorian chant would sometimes combine texts from various
                  > > > scriptures to form a new, coherent chant. Thus the words of Esther, Job,
                  > > > Sarah, and Judith were combined, and so were the words of Susanna, Isaiah,
                  > > > and Paul: Catherine Brown Tkacz, "Singing Women's Words as Sacramental
                  > > > Mimesis," Recherches de Theologie et Philosophie medievales 52.2 (2003):
                  > > > 275-328 at pp. 306 and 311-13. In the same way, it appears that certain
                  > > > chants combined elements from the Matthew lection of interest here with
                  > > > echoes of Luke 9:11, and this led to the Lukan clause actually appearing
                  > > > sometimes in the lection itself."
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > Best wishes
                  > > >
                  > > > Wieland
                  > > >
                  > > > <><
                  > > >
                  > > > --------------------------
                  > > >
                  > > > Wieland Willker, Bremen, Germany
                  > > >
                  > > > http://www-user.uni-bremen.de/~wie
                  > > >
                  > > > Textcritical commentary:
                  > > >
                  > > > http://www-user.uni-bremen.de/~wie/TCG/
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > Please check out the TC forum:
                  > > >
                  > > > http://tcg.iphpbb3.com
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > From: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
                  > > > [mailto:textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of sarban
                  > > > Sent: Monday, June 18, 2012 8:47 PM
                  > > > To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
                  > > > Subject: [textualcriticism] Teaching them about the Kingdom of God in the
                  > > > Latin of Matthew 21:17
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > A number of Latin manuscripts have docebat eos de regno dei. added to the
                  > > > end of Matthew 21:17
                  > > >
                  > > > Does anyone know the origin of this reading ?
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > Andrew Criddle
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                • TeunisV
                  At Mt 21,17/18 in the Catena Aurea is a reference to Jesus teaching/preaching: Gloss., ap. Anselm: For in permitting His flesh to suffer that which properly
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jun 20, 2012
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                    At Mt 21,17/18 in the Catena Aurea is a reference to Jesus' teaching/preaching:

                    Gloss., ap. Anselm: For in permitting His flesh to suffer that which properly pertains to
                    flesh, He foreshews His passion. Mark the earnest zeal of the active labourer, Who is said
                    to have gone early into the city to preach, and to gain some to His Father.

                    http://www.ccel.org/ccel/aquinas/catena1.html

                    Teunis van Lopik

                    --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, jovial@... wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > I can't help but wonder if "docebat eos de regno dei" isn't an alternate interpretation of Matt 21:18 from a Hebrew source text ior polyglot correction that propogated to a Latin only text.  OK....maybe it is a wild addition.  But maybe it came from this....
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Matt 21:18 could be written in Hebrew as ישו×` ×`×`קר אל עיר " = "he returned in the morning unto the city..."  Suppose for a moment that someone read the first 3 words as "ישו×` ×`קרא אל" or "יש×`ו ×`קרא אל", interpretted it as "And he taught by calling out [about the kingdom of] God".  There's some verbage missing for that interpretation and they would have gotten a bit addative in the Latin, but with " יש×` " and " אל " having mutiple readings that would both fit 21:18 and the 21:17b Latin addition, I have to wonder.  They missed out on thoroughness if that's where this came from.  But sloppier things have happened.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > OK, maybe it got in there for another reason, but I just thought this was worth mentioning.  Maybe there's another explanation.  We've all seen wilder additions than this.
                    >
                  • Daniel Buck
                    Sorry about that dyslexic attack, I was in Matthew 17:21. I won t blame Andrew for leading me astray by translating docebat as teaching rather than (he)
                    Message 9 of 13 , Jun 20, 2012
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                      Sorry about that dyslexic attack, I was in Matthew 17:21. I won't blame Andrew for leading me astray by translating docebat as 'teaching' rather than '(he) taught.'

                      NOW I'm in 21:17, and noting that the variant appears to be not added to the last word of the verse, but replacing it, thus:

                      Vg Text: Abiit foras extra civitatem in bethaniam ibique mansit.
                      Variant: Abiit foras extra civitatem in bethaniam ibique docebat eos de regon dei.
                      Saxon: And he forlet hi da and ferde of daere byrig, to Bethania; and lerde hi dar be Godes rice.

                      Thus the Gregorian Chant.

                      In another form, however, the variant appears to have been wholly supplementary, with ibique before mansit.

                      Wycliffe (2001 ed.): And when he had left them, he went forth out of the city, into Bethany; and there he dwelt, and taught them of the kingdom of God.

                      I refer anyone who can decipher it to the entry on page 482 of Matthew Poole's Synopsis Criticorum, which cites Luke 21:37.

                      Daniel Buck

                      From: robert robinson <obadiahorthodox@...>
                      To: "textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com" <textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Tuesday, June 19, 2012 9:35 PM
                      Subject: Re: [textualcriticism] Teaching them about the Kingdom of God in the Latin of Matthew 21:17

                       
                      here is what Adam clarke wrote about the verse  
                        Verse 17. "And he left them (katalipwn, finally leaving them) and went-into Bethany; and he lodged there." - Bethany was a village about two miles distant from Jerusalem, by Mount Olivet, John xi. 18; and it is remarkable that from this day till his death, which happened about six days after, he spent not one night in Jerusalem, but went every evening to Bethany, and returned to the city each morning. See Luke xxi. 37; xxii. 39;John viii. 1, 2. They were about to murder the Lord of glory; and the true light, which they had rejected, is now departing from them.
                      "Lodged there." - Not merely to avoid the snares laid for him by those bad men, but to take away all suspicion of his affecting the regal power. To the end of this verse is added by the Saxon, . And taught them of the kingdom of God. This same reading is found in some MSS., Missals, and one copy of the Itala. It appears also in Wickliff, and my old folio English MS. Bible, and taugt hem of the kyngdom of God; and in two MS. copies of the Vulgate, in my possession: one, duodecimo, very fairly written, in 1300; the other a large folio, probably written in the 11th or 12th century, in which the words are, IBIQUE docebat eos de regno Dei. AND THERE he taught them concerning the kingdom of God.


                      From: Wieland Willker <wie@...>
                      To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Tuesday, June 19, 2012 3:48 AM
                      Subject: RE: [textualcriticism] Teaching them about the Kingdom of God in the Latin of Matthew 21:17

                       
                      On this website one finds:
                       
                      “The final clause is not found in the Greek or the Vulgate, but it is in Gregorian chant and thence it entered this lection in some medieval missals”
                       
                      The footnote adds:
                      The composers of Gregorian chant would sometimes combine texts from various scriptures to form a new, coherent chant. Thus the words of Esther, Job, Sarah, and Judith were combined, and so were the words of Susanna, Isaiah, and Paul: Catherine Brown Tkacz, "Singing Women's Words as Sacramental Mimesis," Recherches de Theologie et Philosophie medievales 52.2 (2003): 275-328 at pp. 306 and 311-13. In the same way, it appears that certain chants combined elements from the Matthew lection of interest here with echoes of Luke 9:11, and this led to the Lukan clause actually appearing sometimes in the lection itself.”
                       
                      Best wishes
                          Wieland
                          <><
                      --------------------------
                      Wieland Willker, Bremen, Germany
                      http://www-user.uni-bremen.de/~wie
                      Textcritical commentary:
                      http://www-user.uni-bremen.de/~wie/TCG/
                       
                      Please check out the TC forum:
                      http://tcg.iphpbb3.com
                       
                       
                       
                       
                      From: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com [mailto:textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of sarban
                      Sent: Monday, June 18, 2012 8:47 PM
                      To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [textualcriticism] Teaching them about the Kingdom of God in the Latin of Matthew 21:17
                       



                      A number of Latin manuscripts have docebat eos de regno dei. added to the end of Matthew 21:17
                      Does anyone know the origin of this reading ?
                       
                      Andrew Criddle







                    • George F Somsel
                      Where?   21:17–2217. And he left them, and went out of the city into Bethany; and he lodged there. 18. Now in the morning as he returned into the city, he
                      Message 10 of 13 , Jun 20, 2012
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                        Where?
                         
                        21:17–22
                        17. And he left them, and went out of the city into Bethany; and he lodged there.
                        18. Now in the morning as he returned into the city, he hungered.
                        19. And when he saw a fig tree in the way, he came to it, and found nothing thereon, but leaves only, and said unto it, Let no fruit grow on thee henceforward for ever. And presently the fig tree withered away.
                        20. And when the disciples saw it, they marvelled, saying, How soon is the fig tree withered away!
                        21. Jesus answered and said unto them, Verily I say unto you, If ye have faith, and doubt not, ye shall not only do this which is done to the fig tree, but also if ye shall say unto this mountain, Be thou removed, and be thou cast into the sea; it shall be done.
                        22. And all things, whatsoever ye shall ask in prayer believing, ye shall receive.
                        Pseudo-Chrysostom. A bad man is better overcome by giving way to him than by replying to him; for wickedness is not instructed but stimulated by reproof. The Lord accordingly sought by withdrawing Himself to check those whom His words could not check; whence it is said, And He left them, and went out of the city into Bethany.
                        Jerome. Hence it is to be understood that the Lord was in so great poverty, and so far from having courted any one, that He had found in all that city neither entertainer, nor abode, but He made His home in a little village, in the house of Lazarus and his sisters; for their village was Bethany; and it follows, and He lodged there.
                        Pseudo-Chrysostom. Seeking surely to lodge in the body where His spirit also reposed; for so it is with all holy men, they love to be not where sumptuous banquets are, but where holiness flourishes.
                        Jerome. When the shades of night were dispersed, and He was returning to the city, the Lord was an hungred, thus shewing the reality of His human body.
                        Gloss. (ap. Anselm.) For in permitting His flesh to suffer that which properly pertains to flesh, He fore-shews His passion. Mark the earnest zeal of the active labourer, Who is said to have gone early into the city to preach, and to gain some to His Father.
                        Jerome. The Lord about to suffer among the nations, and to take upon Him the offence of the Cross, sought to strengthen the minds of His disciples by a previous miracle; whence it follows, And seeing a fig-tree by the wayside, He came to it, and found nothing thereon, but leaves only.
                        Chrysostom. He came not because He was an hungred, but for His disciples’ sake; for because He ever did good and inflicted suffering on none, it behoved that He should set forth an example of His power of punishment; and this He would not exert upon man, but upon a plant.
                        Hilary. Herein also we find proof of the Lord’s goodness; where He was minded to shew forth an instance of the salvation procured by His means, He exerted the power of His might on the persons of men; by healing their present sicknesses, encouraging them to hope for the future, and to look for the healing of their soul. But now when He would exhibit a type of His judgments on the rebellious, He represents the future by the destruction of a tree; Let no fruit grow on thee henceforward for ever.
                        Jerome. For ever, (in sempiternum,) or, To the end of the world, (in sæculum,) for the Greek word αἰῶγ signifies both.
                        Chrysostom. This was only a supposition of the disciples that it was cursed because it had not fruit; for another Evangelist says that it was not yet the season. Why then was it cursed? For the disciples’ sake, that they might learn that He had power to wither up those who crucified Him. And He worked this miracle in that which of all plants is the most juicy, that the greatness of the miracle might be more apparent. And when aught of this kind is done to brutes or vegetables, ask not whether the fig were with justice withered up, seeing it was not the season for its fruit; for to enquire thus were extreme madness, for in such creatures there can be neither fault nor punishment; but consider the miracle, and admire the Worker of it.
                        Gloss. (ord.) The Creator does no wrong to the owner, but His creature at His will is converted to the profit of others.
                        Chrysostom. And that you may learn that this was done for their sakes, to the end, namely, that they should be stirred up to confidence, hear what is said further. Jesus answered and said unto them, Verily I say unto you, if ye shall have faith.
                        Jerome. The Gentile dogs bark against us, affirming that the Apostles had not faith, because they were not able to remove mountains. To whom we answer, that many wonders were done by the Lord which are not written; and therefore we believe the Apostles to have done some not written; and that they were therefore not written, that the unbelieving might not have in them larger room for cavilling. For let us ask them, do they believe the miracles which are written, or do they not? And when they look incredulous, we can then establish that they who believe not the lesser would not have believed the greater.
                        Chrysostom. This that the Lord speaks of He ascribes to prayer and faith; whence He continues, And all things whatsoever ye shall ask in prayer believing ye shall receive.
                        Origen. For Christ’s disciples pray for nothing that they ought not, and as confiding in their Master they pray only for things great and heavenly.
                        Rabanus. But whenever we are not heard when we pray, it is either because we ask something adverse to the means of our salvation; or because the perverseness of those for whom we ask hinders its being granted to them; or because the performance of our request is put off to a future time, that our desires may wax stronger, and so may have more perfect capacity for the joys they seek after.
                        Augustine. (de Cons. Ev. ii. 68.) It must be considered that Mark relates the wonder of the disciples at the withering of the tree, and the answer of the Lord concerning faith, to have been not on the day following the cursing of the tree, but on the third day after; and that on the second day Mark relates the casting of the merchants out of the Temple, which he had omitted on the first day. On the second day then he says that He went forth out of the city in the evening, and that as they passed by in the morning, the disciples then saw that the fig tree was withered. But Matthew speaks as though all this had been done on the day following. This must be so taken as that when Matthew, having related that the fig tree was dried up, adds immediately, omitting all the events of the second day, And when the disciples saw if, they marvelled, he yet meant that it was on another day that they marvelled. For the tree must be supposed to have withered at the time it was cursed, not at the time they saw it. For they did not see it withering, but when it was withered, and by that they understood that it had withered immediately upon the Lord’s words.
                        Origen. Mystically; the Lord leaving the Chief Priests and Scribes withdrew without the earthly Jerusalem, which therefore fell. He came to Bethany to ‘The house of obedience,’ that is, to the Church, where when He had taken rest after the first erecting of the Church, He returned to the city which He had left a little while before, and returning, He was an hungred.
                        Pseudo-Chrysostom. For had His hunger been as man for carnal food, He would not have hungred in the morning; he truly hungers in the morning who hungers after the salvation of others.
                        Jerome. The tree which He saw by the wayside we understand as the synagogue, which was nigh to the way inasmuch as it had the Law, but yet believed not on the way, that is, on Christ.
                        Hilary. And that is compared to a fig tree, because the Apostles being the first believers out of Israel, like green figs shall in the glory, and the time, of their resurrection, be before the rest.
                        Pseudo-Chrysostom. Also the fig in respect of the multitude of seeds under one skin is as it were an assembly of the faithful. But He finds nothing on it but leaves only, that is, pharisaical traditions, an outward shew of the Law without the fruits of truth.
                        Origen. And because this plant was figuratively a living creature, having a soul, He speaks to it as though it heard. Let no fruit grow on thee henceforward for ever. Therefore is the Jewish synagogue barren, and shall continue so until the end of the world, when the multitude of the Gentiles shall come in; and the fig tree withered while Christ was yet sojourning in this life; and the disciples seeing by their spiritual discernment the mystery of the withered faith, wondered; and having faith, and not doubting, they bare it, and so it withers when their lifegiving virtue passes to the Gentiles; and by each one who is brought to the faith, that mountain Satan is lifted up and cast into the sea, that is, into the abyss.
                        Pseudo-Chrysostom. Or; Into the sea, that is, into the world where the waters are salt, i. e. the people are wicked.
                        Rabanus. And he avenges his exclusion from the elect by more cruel treatment of the reprobate.
                        Augustine. (Quæst. Ev. i. 29.) Or, this is to be said by each servant of God in his own case respecting the mountain of pride, to cast it from him. Or, because by Jews the Gospel was preached, the Lord Himself, who is called the mount, is by the Jews cast among the Gentiles as into a sea.
                        Origen. For every man who is obedient to the word of God is Bethany, and Christ abides in him; but the wicked and the sinners He leaves. And when He has been with the righteous, He goes to other righteous after them, and accompanied by them; for it is not said that He left Bethany and went into the city. The Lord ever is an hungred among the righteous, desiring to eat among them the fruit of the Holy Spirit, which are love, joy, peace. But this fig tree which had leaves only without fruit, grew by the wayside.
                        Pseudo-Chrysostom. That is, nigh to the world; for if a man lives nigh to the world, he cannot preserve in himself the fruit of righteousness.
                        Origen. But if the Lord come seeking fruit with temptations, and one be found having nought of righteousness but only a profession of faith, which is leaves without fruit, he is soon withered, losing even his seeming faith; and every disciple makes this fig tree to wither, by making it be seen that he is void of Christ, as Peter said to Simon, Thy heart is not right in the sight of God (Acts 8:21.) For it is better that a deceitful fig tree which is thought to be alive, yet brings forth no fruit, should be withered up at the word of Christ’s disciples, than that by an imposture it should steal aawy innocent hearts. Also there is in every unbeliever a mountain great in proportion to his unbelief, which is removed by the words of Christ’s disciples.
                         
                        george
                        gfsomsel

                        search for truth, hear truth,
                        learn truth, love truth, speak the truth, hold the truth,
                        defend the truth till death.

                        - Jan Hus
                        _________

                        From: TeunisV <tvanlopik@...>
                        To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2012 2:42 AM
                        Subject: [textualcriticism] Re: Teaching them about the Kingdom of God in the Latin of Matthew 21:17

                         
                        At Mt 21,17/18 in the Catena Aurea is a reference to Jesus' teaching/preaching:

                        Gloss., ap. Anselm: For in permitting His flesh to suffer that which properly pertains to
                        flesh, He foreshews His passion. Mark the earnest zeal of the active labourer, Who is said
                        to have gone early into the city to preach, and to gain some to His Father.

                        http://www.ccel.org/ccel/aquinas/catena1.html

                        Teunis van Lopik

                        --- In mailto:textualcriticism%40yahoogroups.com, jovial@... wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > I can't help but wonder if "docebat eos de regno dei" isn't an alternate interpretation of Matt 21:18 from a Hebrew source text ior polyglot correction that propogated to a Latin only text.聽 OK....maybe it is a wild addition.聽 But maybe it came from this....
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Matt 21:18 could be written in Hebrew as 讬砖讜譧 譧譧拽专 讗诇 注讬专 " = "he returned in the morning unto the city..."聽 Suppose for a moment that someone read the first 3 words聽as "讬砖讜譧 譧拽专讗 讗诇" or "讬砖譧讜 譧拽专讗 讗诇", interpretted it as "And he taught by calling out [about the kingdom of] God".聽 There's some verbage missing for that interpretation and they would have gotten a bit addative in the Latin, but with " 讬砖譧 " and " 讗诇 " having mutiple readings that would both fit 21:18 and the 21:17b Latin addition, I have to wonder.聽 They missed out on thoroughness if that's where this came from.聽 But sloppier things have happened.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > OK, maybe it got in there for another reason, but I just thought this was worth mentioning.聽 Maybe there's another explanation.聽 We've all seen wilder additions than this.
                        >



                      • TeunisV
                        In the German translation by Oischinger, Regegensburg, 1881, I see: Betrachte sodann den grossen Eifer des thaetigen Arbeiters, da er am Morgen in die Stadt
                        Message 11 of 13 , Jun 20, 2012
                        • 0 Attachment
                          In the German translation by Oischinger, Regegensburg, 1881, I see:
                          Betrachte sodann den grossen Eifer des thaetigen Arbeiters, da er am Morgen in die Stadt zurueckkehrte, um zu predigen und Einige Gott dem Vater zu gewinnen. Here the source mentioned is Beda and not a gloss with Anselm!

                          --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, George F Somsel <gfsomsel@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Where?
                          >  
                          > 21:17â€"2217. And he left them, and went out of the city into Bethany; and he lodged there.
                          > 18. Now in the morning as he returned into the city, he hungered.
                          > 19. And when he saw a fig tree in the way, he came to it, and found nothing thereon, but leaves only, and said unto it, Let no fruit grow on thee henceforward for ever. And presently the fig tree withered away.
                          > 20. And when the disciples saw it, they marvelled, saying, How soon is the fig tree withered away!
                          > 21. Jesus answered and said unto them, Verily I say unto you, If ye have faith, and doubt not, ye shall not only do this which is done to the fig tree, but also if ye shall say unto this mountain, Be thou removed, and be thou cast into the sea; it shall be done.
                          > 22. And all things, whatsoever ye shall ask in prayer believing, ye shall receive.
                          > Pseudo-Chrysostom. A bad man is better overcome by giving way to him than by replying to him; for wickedness is not instructed but stimulated by reproof. The Lord accordingly sought by withdrawing Himself to check those whom His words could not check; whence it is said, And He left them, and went out of the city into Bethany.
                          > Jerome. Hence it is to be understood that the Lord was in so great poverty, and so far from having courted any one, that He had found in all that city neither entertainer, nor abode, but He made His home in a little village, in the house of Lazarus and his sisters; for their village was Bethany; and it follows, and He lodged there.
                          > Pseudo-Chrysostom. Seeking surely to lodge in the body where His spirit also reposed; for so it is with all holy men, they love to be not where sumptuous banquets are, but where holiness flourishes.
                          > Jerome. When the shades of night were dispersed, and He was returning to the city, the Lord was an hungred, thus shewing the reality of His human body.
                          >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
                          > Gloss. (ap. Anselm.) For in permitting His flesh to suffer that which properly pertains to flesh, He fore-shews His passion. Mark the earnest zeal of the active labourer, Who is said to have gone early into the city to preach, and to gain some to His Father.
                          >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
                          > Jerome. The Lord about to suffer among the nations, and to take upon Him the offence of the Cross, sought to strengthen the minds of His disciples by a previous miracle; whence it follows, And seeing a fig-tree by the wayside, He came to it, and found nothing thereon, but leaves only.
                          > Chrysostom. He came not because He was an hungred, but for His disciples’ sake; for because He ever did good and inflicted suffering on none, it behoved that He should set forth an example of His power of punishment; and this He would not exert upon man, but upon a plant.
                          > Hilary. Herein also we find proof of the Lord’s goodness; where He was minded to shew forth an instance of the salvation procured by His means, He exerted the power of His might on the persons of men; by healing their present sicknesses, encouraging them to hope for the future, and to look for the healing of their soul. But now when He would exhibit a type of His judgments on the rebellious, He represents the future by the destruction of a tree; Let no fruit grow on thee henceforward for ever.
                          > Jerome. For ever, (in sempiternum,) or, To the end of the world, (in sæculum,) for the Greek word αἰῶγsignifies both.
                          > Chrysostom. This was only a supposition of the disciples that it was cursed because it had not fruit; for another Evangelist says that it was not yet the season. Why then was it cursed? For the disciples’ sake, that they might learn that He had power to wither up those who crucified Him. And He worked this miracle in that which of all plants is the most juicy, that the greatness of the miracle might be more apparent. And when aught of this kind is done to brutes or vegetables, ask not whether the fig were with justice withered up, seeing it was not the season for its fruit; for to enquire thus were extreme madness, for in such creatures there can be neither fault nor punishment; but consider the miracle, and admire the Worker of it.
                          > Gloss. (ord.) The Creator does no wrong to the owner, but His creature at His will is converted to the profit of others.
                          > Chrysostom. And that you may learn that this was done for their sakes, to the end, namely, that they should be stirred up to confidence, hear what is said further. Jesus answered and said unto them, Verily I say unto you, if ye shall have faith.
                          > Jerome. The Gentile dogs bark against us, affirming that the Apostles had not faith, because they were not able to remove mountains. To whom we answer, that many wonders were done by the Lord which are not written; and therefore we believe the Apostles to have done some not written; and that they were therefore not written, that the unbelieving might not have in them larger room for cavilling. For let us ask them, do they believe the miracles which are written, or do they not? And when they look incredulous, we can then establish that they who believe not the lesser would not have believed the greater.
                          > Chrysostom. This that the Lord speaks of He ascribes to prayer and faith; whence He continues, And all things whatsoever ye shall ask in prayer believing ye shall receive.
                          > Origen. For Christ’s disciples pray for nothing that they ought not, and as confiding in their Master they pray only for things great and heavenly.
                          > Rabanus. But whenever we are not heard when we pray, it is either because we ask something adverse to the means of our salvation; or because the perverseness of those for whom we ask hinders its being granted to them; or because the performance of our request is put off to a future time, that our desires may wax stronger, and so may have more perfect capacity for the joys they seek after.
                          > Augustine. (de Cons. Ev. ii. 68.) It must be considered that Mark relates the wonder of the disciples at the withering of the tree, and the answer of the Lord concerning faith, to have been not on the day following the cursing of the tree, but on the third day after; and that on the second day Mark relates the casting of the merchants out of the Temple, which he had omitted on the first day. On the second day then he says that He went forth out of the city in the evening, and that as they passed by in the morning, the disciples then saw that the fig tree was withered. But Matthew speaks as though all this had been done on the day following. This must be so taken as that when Matthew, having related that the fig tree was dried up, adds immediately, omitting all the events of the second day, And when the disciples saw if, they marvelled, he yet meant that it was on another day that they marvelled. For the tree must be supposed to have withered at the time
                          > it was cursed, not at the time they saw it. For they did not see it withering, but when it was withered, and by that they understood that it had withered immediately upon the Lord’s words.
                          > Origen. Mystically; the Lord leaving the Chief Priests and Scribes withdrew without the earthly Jerusalem, which therefore fell. He came to Bethany to ‘The house of obedience,’ that is, to the Church, where when He had taken rest after the first erecting of the Church, He returned to the city which He had left a little while before, and returning, He was an hungred.
                          > Pseudo-Chrysostom. For had His hunger been as man for carnal food, He would not have hungred in the morning; he truly hungers in the morning who hungers after the salvation of others.
                          > Jerome. The tree which He saw by the wayside we understand as the synagogue, which was nigh to the way inasmuch as it had the Law, but yet believed not on the way, that is, on Christ.
                          > Hilary. And that is compared to a fig tree, because the Apostles being the first believers out of Israel, like green figs shall in the glory, and the time, of their resurrection, be before the rest.
                          > Pseudo-Chrysostom. Also the fig in respect of the multitude of seeds under one skin is as it were an assembly of the faithful. But He finds nothing on it but leaves only, that is, pharisaical traditions, an outward shew of the Law without the fruits of truth.
                          > Origen. And because this plant was figuratively a living creature, having a soul, He speaks to it as though it heard. Let no fruit grow on thee henceforward for ever. Therefore is the Jewish synagogue barren, and shall continue so until the end of the world, when the multitude of the Gentiles shall come in; and the fig tree withered while Christ was yet sojourning in this life; and the disciples seeing by their spiritual discernment the mystery of the withered faith, wondered; and having faith, and not doubting, they bare it, and so it withers when their lifegiving virtue passes to the Gentiles; and by each one who is brought to the faith, that mountain Satan is lifted up and cast into the sea, that is, into the abyss.
                          > Pseudo-Chrysostom. Or; Into the sea, that is, into the world where the waters are salt, i. e. the people are wicked.
                          > Rabanus. And he avenges his exclusion from the elect by more cruel treatment of the reprobate.
                          > Augustine. (Quæst. Ev. i. 29.) Or, this is to be said by each servant of God in his own case respecting the mountain of pride, to cast it from him. Or, because by Jews the Gospel was preached, the Lord Himself, who is called the mount, is by the Jews cast among the Gentiles as into a sea.
                          > Origen. For every man who is obedient to the word of God is Bethany, and Christ abides in him; but the wicked and the sinners He leaves. And when He has been with the righteous, He goes to other righteous after them, and accompanied by them; for it is not said that He left Bethany and went into the city. The Lord ever is an hungred among the righteous, desiring to eat among them the fruit of the Holy Spirit, which are love, joy, peace. But this fig tree which had leaves only without fruit, grew by the wayside.
                          > Pseudo-Chrysostom. That is, nigh to the world; for if a man lives nigh to the world, he cannot preserve in himself the fruit of righteousness.
                          > Origen. But if the Lord come seeking fruit with temptations, and one be found having nought of righteousness but only a profession of faith, which is leaves without fruit, he is soon withered, losing even his seeming faith; and every disciple makes this fig tree to wither, by making it be seen that he is void of Christ, as Peter said to Simon, Thy heart is not right in the sight of God (Acts 8:21.) For it is better that a deceitful fig tree which is thought to be alive, yet brings forth no fruit, should be withered up at the word of Christ’s disciples, than that by an imposture it should steal aawy innocent hearts. Also there is in every unbeliever a mountain great in proportion to his unbelief, which is removed by the words of Christ’s disciples.
                          >
                          >
                          > george
                          > gfsomsel
                          >
                          > search for truth, hear truth,
                          > learn truth, love truth, speak the truth, hold the truth,
                          > defend the truth till death.
                          >
                          > - Jan Hus
                          > _________
                          > …
                          >
                          >
                          > >________________________________
                          > > From: TeunisV <tvanlopik@...>
                          > >To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
                          > >Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2012 2:42 AM
                          > >Subject: [textualcriticism] Re: Teaching them about the Kingdom of God in the Latin of Matthew 21:17
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > 
                          > >
                          > >At Mt 21,17/18 in the Catena Aurea is a reference to Jesus' teaching/preaching:
                          > >
                          > >Gloss., ap. Anselm: For in permitting His flesh to suffer that which properly pertains to
                          > >flesh, He foreshews His passion. Mark the earnest zeal of the active labourer, Who is said
                          > >to have gone early into the city to preach, and to gain some to His Father.
                          > >
                          > >http://www.ccel.org/ccel/aquinas/catena1.html
                          > >
                          > >Teunis van Lopik
                          > >
                          > >--- In mailto:textualcriticism%40yahoogroups.com, jovial@ wrote:
                          > >>
                          > >>
                          > >>
                          > >> I can't help but wonder if "docebat eos de regno dei" isn't an alternate interpretation of Matt 21:18 from a Hebrew source text ior polyglot correction that propogated to a Latin only text.聽 OK....maybe it is a wild addition.聽 But maybe it came from this....
                          > >>
                          > >>
                          > >>
                          > >> Matt 21:18 could be written in Hebrew as 讬砖讜譧 譧譧拽ä¸" 讗诇 注讬ä¸" " = "he returned in the morning unto the city..."聽 Suppose for a moment that someone read the first 3 words聽as "讬砖讜譧 譧拽ä¸"讗 讗诇" or "讬砖譧讜 譧拽ä¸"讗 讗诇", interpretted it as "And he taught by calling out [about the kingdom of] God".聽 There's some verbage missing for that interpretation and they would have gotten a bit addative in the Latin, but with " 讬砖譧 " and " 讗诇 " having mutiple readings that would both fit 21:18 and the 21:17b Latin addition, I have to wonder.聽 They missed out on thoroughness if that's where this came from.聽 But sloppier things have happened.
                          > >>
                          > >>
                          > >>
                          > >> OK, maybe it got in there for another reason, but I just thought this was worth mentioning.聽 Maybe there's another explanation.聽 We've all seen wilder additions than this.
                          > >>
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          >
                        • George F Somsel
                          I find no such reference in Bede.  Perhaps I simply don t know sufficiently well how to search my electronic edition of his works. george gfsomsel search for
                          Message 12 of 13 , Jun 20, 2012
                          • 0 Attachment
                            I find no such reference in Bede.  Perhaps I simply don't know sufficiently well how to search my electronic edition of his works.
                             
                            george
                            gfsomsel

                            search for truth, hear truth,
                            learn truth, love truth, speak the truth, hold the truth,
                            defend the truth till death.

                            - Jan Hus
                            _________

                            From: TeunisV <tvanlopik@...>
                            To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2012 1:11 PM
                            Subject: [textualcriticism] Re: Teaching them about the Kingdom of God in the Latin of Matthew 21:17

                             
                            In the German translation by Oischinger, Regegensburg, 1881, I see:
                            Betrachte sodann den grossen Eifer des thaetigen Arbeiters, da er am Morgen in die Stadt zurueckkehrte, um zu predigen und Einige Gott dem Vater zu gewinnen. Here the source mentioned is Beda and not a gloss with Anselm!

                            --- In mailto:textualcriticism%40yahoogroups.com, George F Somsel <gfsomsel@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Where?
                            >  
                            > 21:17â€"2217. And he left them, and went out of the city into Bethany; and he lodged there.
                            > 18. Now in the morning as he returned into the city, he hungered.
                            > 19. And when he saw a fig tree in the way, he came to it, and found nothing thereon, but leaves only, and said unto it, Let no fruit grow on thee henceforward for ever. And presently the fig tree withered away.
                            > 20. And when the disciples saw it, they marvelled, saying, How soon is the fig tree withered away!
                            > 21. Jesus answered and said unto them, Verily I say unto you, If ye have faith, and doubt not, ye shall not only do this which is done to the fig tree, but also if ye shall say unto this mountain, Be thou removed, and be thou cast into the sea; it shall be done.
                            > 22. And all things, whatsoever ye shall ask in prayer believing, ye shall receive.
                            > Pseudo-Chrysostom. A bad man is better overcome by giving way to him than by replying to him; for wickedness is not instructed but stimulated by reproof. The Lord accordingly sought by withdrawing Himself to check those whom His words could not check; whence it is said, And He left them, and went out of the city into Bethany.
                            > Jerome. Hence it is to be understood that the Lord was in so great poverty, and so far from having courted any one, that He had found in all that city neither entertainer, nor abode, but He made His home in a little village, in the house of Lazarus and his sisters; for their village was Bethany; and it follows, and He lodged there.
                            > Pseudo-Chrysostom. Seeking surely to lodge in the body where His spirit also reposed; for so it is with all holy men, they love to be not where sumptuous banquets are, but where holiness flourishes.
                            > Jerome. When the shades of night were dispersed, and He was returning to the city, the Lord was an hungred, thus shewing the reality of His human body.
                            >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
                            > Gloss. (ap. Anselm.) For in permitting His flesh to suffer that which properly pertains to flesh, He fore-shews His passion. Mark the earnest zeal of the active labourer, Who is said to have gone early into the city to preach, and to gain some to His Father.
                            >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
                            > Jerome. The Lord about to suffer among the nations, and to take upon Him the offence of the Cross, sought to strengthen the minds of His disciples by a previous miracle; whence it follows, And seeing a fig-tree by the wayside, He came to it, and found nothing thereon, but leaves only.
                            > Chrysostom. He came not because He was an hungred, but for His disciples’ sake; for because He ever did good and inflicted suffering on none, it behoved that He should set forth an example of His power of punishment; and this He would not exert upon man, but upon a plant.
                            > Hilary. Herein also we find proof of the Lord’s goodness; where He was minded to shew forth an instance of the salvation procured by His means, He exerted the power of His might on the persons of men; by healing their present sicknesses, encouraging them to hope for the future, and to look for the healing of their soul. But now when He would exhibit a type of His judgments on the rebellious, He represents the future by the destruction of a tree; Let no fruit grow on thee henceforward for ever.
                            > Jerome. For ever, (in sempiternum,) or, To the end of the world, (in sæculum,) for the Greek word αἰῶγsignifies both.
                            > Chrysostom. This was only a supposition of the disciples that it was cursed because it had not fruit; for another Evangelist says that it was not yet the season. Why then was it cursed? For the disciples’ sake, that they might learn that He had power to wither up those who crucified Him. And He worked this miracle in that which of all plants is the most juicy, that the greatness of the miracle might be more apparent. And when aught of this kind is done to brutes or vegetables, ask not whether the fig were with justice withered up, seeing it was not the season for its fruit; for to enquire thus were extreme madness, for in such creatures there can be neither fault nor punishment; but consider the miracle, and admire the Worker of it.
                            > Gloss. (ord.) The Creator does no wrong to the owner, but His creature at His will is converted to the profit of others.
                            > Chrysostom. And that you may learn that this was done for their sakes, to the end, namely, that they should be stirred up to confidence, hear what is said further. Jesus answered and said unto them, Verily I say unto you, if ye shall have faith.
                            > Jerome. The Gentile dogs bark against us, affirming that the Apostles had not faith, because they were not able to remove mountains. To whom we answer, that many wonders were done by the Lord which are not written; and therefore we believe the Apostles to have done some not written; and that they were therefore not written, that the unbelieving might not have in them larger room for cavilling. For let us ask them, do they believe the miracles which are written, or do they not? And when they look incredulous, we can then establish that they who believe not the lesser would not have believed the greater.
                            > Chrysostom. This that the Lord speaks of He ascribes to prayer and faith; whence He continues, And all things whatsoever ye shall ask in prayer believing ye shall receive.
                            > Origen. For Christ’s disciples pray for nothing that they ought not, and as confiding in their Master they pray only for things great and heavenly.
                            > Rabanus. But whenever we are not heard when we pray, it is either because we ask something adverse to the means of our salvation; or because the perverseness of those for whom we ask hinders its being granted to them; or because the performance of our request is put off to a future time, that our desires may wax stronger, and so may have more perfect capacity for the joys they seek after.
                            > Augustine. (de Cons. Ev. ii. 68.) It must be considered that Mark relates the wonder of the disciples at the withering of the tree, and the answer of the Lord concerning faith, to have been not on the day following the cursing of the tree, but on the third day after; and that on the second day Mark relates the casting of the merchants out of the Temple, which he had omitted on the first day. On the second day then he says that He went forth out of the city in the evening, and that as they passed by in the morning, the disciples then saw that the fig tree was withered. But Matthew speaks as though all this had been done on the day following. This must be so taken as that when Matthew, having related that the fig tree was dried up, adds immediately, omitting all the events of the second day, And when the disciples saw if, they marvelled, he yet meant that it was on another day that they marvelled. For the tree must be supposed to have withered at the time
                            > it was cursed, not at the time they saw it. For they did not see it withering, but when it was withered, and by that they understood that it had withered immediately upon the Lord’s words.
                            > Origen. Mystically; the Lord leaving the Chief Priests and Scribes withdrew without the earthly Jerusalem, which therefore fell. He came to Bethany to ‘The house of obedience,’ that is, to the Church, where when He had taken rest after the first erecting of the Church, He returned to the city which He had left a little while before, and returning, He was an hungred.
                            > Pseudo-Chrysostom. For had His hunger been as man for carnal food, He would not have hungred in the morning; he truly hungers in the morning who hungers after the salvation of others.
                            > Jerome. The tree which He saw by the wayside we understand as the synagogue, which was nigh to the way inasmuch as it had the Law, but yet believed not on the way, that is, on Christ.
                            > Hilary. And that is compared to a fig tree, because the Apostles being the first believers out of Israel, like green figs shall in the glory, and the time, of their resurrection, be before the rest.
                            > Pseudo-Chrysostom. Also the fig in respect of the multitude of seeds under one skin is as it were an assembly of the faithful. But He finds nothing on it but leaves only, that is, pharisaical traditions, an outward shew of the Law without the fruits of truth.
                            > Origen. And because this plant was figuratively a living creature, having a soul, He speaks to it as though it heard. Let no fruit grow on thee henceforward for ever. Therefore is the Jewish synagogue barren, and shall continue so until the end of the world, when the multitude of the Gentiles shall come in; and the fig tree withered while Christ was yet sojourning in this life; and the disciples seeing by their spiritual discernment the mystery of the withered faith, wondered; and having faith, and not doubting, they bare it, and so it withers when their lifegiving virtue passes to the Gentiles; and by each one who is brought to the faith, that mountain Satan is lifted up and cast into the sea, that is, into the abyss.
                            > Pseudo-Chrysostom. Or; Into the sea, that is, into the world where the waters are salt, i. e. the people are wicked.
                            > Rabanus. And he avenges his exclusion from the elect by more cruel treatment of the reprobate.
                            > Augustine. (Quæst. Ev. i. 29.) Or, this is to be said by each servant of God in his own case respecting the mountain of pride, to cast it from him. Or, because by Jews the Gospel was preached, the Lord Himself, who is called the mount, is by the Jews cast among the Gentiles as into a sea.
                            > Origen. For every man who is obedient to the word of God is Bethany, and Christ abides in him; but the wicked and the sinners He leaves. And when He has been with the righteous, He goes to other righteous after them, and accompanied by them; for it is not said that He left Bethany and went into the city. The Lord ever is an hungred among the righteous, desiring to eat among them the fruit of the Holy Spirit, which are love, joy, peace. But this fig tree which had leaves only without fruit, grew by the wayside.
                            > Pseudo-Chrysostom. That is, nigh to the world; for if a man lives nigh to the world, he cannot preserve in himself the fruit of righteousness.
                            > Origen. But if the Lord come seeking fruit with temptations, and one be found having nought of righteousness but only a profession of faith, which is leaves without fruit, he is soon withered, losing even his seeming faith; and every disciple makes this fig tree to wither, by making it be seen that he is void of Christ, as Peter said to Simon, Thy heart is not right in the sight of God (Acts 8:21.) For it is better that a deceitful fig tree which is thought to be alive, yet brings forth no fruit, should be withered up at the word of Christ’s disciples, than that by an imposture it should steal aawy innocent hearts. Also there is in every unbeliever a mountain great in proportion to his unbelief, which is removed by the words of Christ’s disciples.
                            >
                            >
                            > george
                            > gfsomsel
                            >
                            > search for truth, hear truth,
                            > learn truth, love truth, speak the truth, hold the truth,
                            > defend the truth till death.
                            >
                            > - Jan Hus
                            > _________
                            > …
                            >
                            >
                            > >________________________________
                            > > From: TeunisV <tvanlopik@...>
                            > >To: mailto:textualcriticism%40yahoogroups.com
                            > >Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2012 2:42 AM
                            > >Subject: [textualcriticism] Re: Teaching them about the Kingdom of God in the Latin of Matthew 21:17
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > 
                            > >
                            > >At Mt 21,17/18 in the Catena Aurea is a reference to Jesus' teaching/preaching:
                            > >
                            > >Gloss., ap. Anselm: For in permitting His flesh to suffer that which properly pertains to
                            > >flesh, He foreshews His passion. Mark the earnest zeal of the active labourer, Who is said
                            > >to have gone early into the city to preach, and to gain some to His Father.
                            > >
                            > >http://www.ccel.org/ccel/aquinas/catena1.html
                            > >
                            > >Teunis van Lopik
                            > >
                            > >--- In mailto:textualcriticism%40yahoogroups.com, jovial@ wrote:
                            > >>
                            > >>
                            > >>
                            > >> I can't help but wonder if "docebat eos de regno dei" isn't an alternate interpretation of Matt 21:18 from a Hebrew source text ior polyglot correction that propogated to a Latin only text.� OK....maybe it is a wild addition.� But maybe it came from this....
                            > >>
                            > >>
                            > >>
                            > >> Matt 21:18 could be written in Hebrew as 讬砖讜譧 譧譧拽ä¸" 讗诇 注讬ä¸" " = "he returned in the morning unto the city..."è�½ Suppose for a moment that someone read the first 3 wordsè�½as "讬砖讜譧 譧拽ä¸"è®— 讗诇" or "讬砖譧讜 譧拽ä¸"è®— 讗诇", interpretted it as "And he taught by calling out [about the kingdom of] God".è�½ There's some verbage missing for that interpretation and they would have gotten a bit addative in the Latin, but with " 讬砖譧 " and " 讗诇 " having mutiple readings that would both fit 21:18 and the 21:17b Latin addition, I have to wonder.è�½ They missed out on thoroughness if that's where this came from.è�½ But sloppier things have happened.
                            > >>
                            > >>
                            > >>
                            > >> OK, maybe it got in there for another reason, but I just thought this was worth mentioning.� Maybe there's another explanation.� We've all seen wilder additions than this.
                            > >>
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            >



                          • TeunisV
                            The pointe is of course that in a very popular commentary on the Gospels, The Catena A. Jesus acting as preacher is highlighted at Mt 21,17/18 and conform the
                            Message 13 of 13 , Jun 21, 2012
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                              The pointe is of course that in a very popular commentary on the Gospels, The Catena A. Jesus' acting as preacher is highlighted at Mt 21,17/18 and conform the v.l. in Latin and Saxon mss.
                              Quite another question is the attribution: Beda, Rabanus or even a gloss in Anselmus.
                              A postincunable edition of 1517:
                              http://books.google.nl/books/about/Catena_aurea_super_IV_libros_Evang.html?id=92pFAAAAcAAJ&redir_esc=y
                              Electronic page 171. The first part of note is attributed to Chrysostomos and the second with "ut predicaret" to Rabanus.
                              In an edition of 1660:
                              http://books.google.nl/books?id=FZQRSiy1kj8C&hl=nl&source=gbs_similarbooks
                              Electronic page 258. The first part is Chrysostomos' and the second Bede's.

                              Teunis van Lopik

                              --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, George F Somsel <gfsomsel@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > I find no such reference in Bede.  Perhaps I simply don't know sufficiently well how to search my electronic edition of his works.
                              >
                              > george
                              > gfsomsel
                              >
                              > >________________________________
                              > > From: TeunisV <tvanlopik@...>
                              > >To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
                              > >Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2012 1:11 PM
                              > >Subject: [textualcriticism] Re: Teaching them about the Kingdom of God in the Latin of Matthew 21:17
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > 
                              > >
                              > >In the German translation by Oischinger, Regegensburg, 1881, I see:
                              > >Betrachte sodann den grossen Eifer des thaetigen Arbeiters, da er am Morgen in die Stadt zurueckkehrte, um zu predigen und Einige Gott dem Vater zu gewinnen. Here the source mentioned is Beda and not a gloss with Anselm!
                              > >
                              > >--- In mailto:textualcriticism%40yahoogroups.com, George F Somsel <gfsomsel@> wrote:
                              > >>
                              > >> Where?
                              > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
                              > >> Gloss. (ap. Anselm.) For in permitting His flesh to suffer that which properly pertains to flesh, He fore-shews His passion. Mark the earnest zeal of the active labourer, Who is said to have gone early into the city to preach, and to gain some to His Father.
                              > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
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