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Italian Greek

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  • JV
    I think I finally got an answer to the issue I raised earlier. Greek was well spoken in the souther part of Italy, in the heel and toe of the boot of
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 13, 2012
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      I think I finally got an answer to the issue I raised earlier.

      Greek was well spoken in the souther part of Italy, in the "heel" and "toe" of the "boot" of Italy. There are some idioms I had noticed in a previous writing I had seen of a Greek text that came from Italy once before, but I have since misplaced a copy of it so I can't use it as a reference. I'd love to find something drafted in Greek in Rome and compare the differences to what was spoken in Southern Italy. Preferably something not theologically charged, like one of the Church Pioneers. And something not written by a transplant. Someone born in Greek and moved to Rome would use his childhood dialect. So that would mean Justin wouldn't be much help much if he did write in Greek. I am interested in understanding the Italian Dialect.
    • Barry H.
      ... From: JV To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday, April 13, 2012 7:33 PM Subject: [textualcriticism] Italian Greek ... Good luck your re going to
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 14, 2012
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        ----- Original Message -----
        From: JV
        To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, April 13, 2012 7:33 PM
        Subject: [textualcriticism] Italian Greek



        >I think I finally got an answer to the issue I raised earlier.

        >Greek was well spoken in the souther part of Italy, in the "heel" and "toe"
        >of the "boot" of Italy. There are some idioms I had noticed in a previous
        >writing I had seen of a Greek text that came from Italy once before, but I
        >have since misplaced a copy of it so I can't use it as a reference. I'd
        >love to find something drafted in Greek in Rome and compare the differences
        >to what was spoken in Southern Italy. Preferably something not
        >theologically charged, like one of the Church Pioneers. And something not
        >written by a transplant. Someone born in Greek and moved to Rome would use
        >his childhood dialect. So that would mean Justin wouldn't be much help much
        >if he did write in Greek. I am interested in understanding the Italian
        >Dialect.

        Good luck your're going to need it... :)

        In the first centuries, Greek was widely spoken throughout the
        republic/early empire and even in the city of Rome itself (to the point
        where the poet Juvenal complains that one cannot walk the streets without
        hearing Greek spoken -- sort of like Spanish in Miami). This cosmopolitan
        mixture of Greek is really what produced Koine or Panhellenic. Local
        dialects really didn't survive this process, as far as we can tell with the
        evidence left to us. Additionally, of those writings that survive to us,
        the vast majority of authors are seriously attempting to model themselves
        after classical Attic Greek, and only occasionally does some hint of their
        own dialect or the Koine slip through. We have a few, like Epictetus, who
        write in an "elevated" Koine, and of course the Christian authors, but they
        are of no help for what you want here. There are the non-literary papyri,
        but those are mostly from Egypt (and tend to be Koine). Your best bet might
        be epigraphy, both formal (though those tended to avoid dialecticisms) and
        graffitti.

        N.E. Barry Hofstetter, M.A., M.Div., Th.M
        Semper melius Latine sonat...
        The American Academy
        http://www.theamericanacademy.net
        (2010 Salvatori Excellence in Education Winner)

        http://my.opera.com/barryhofstetter/blog
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