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Three Latin Books from the Early 1500's

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  • james_snapp_jr
    Early Christmas presents for everyone! Here are three extremely late, but still interesting, Latin manuscripts. At the Morgan Library and Museum, there are
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 6, 2011
      Early Christmas presents for everyone!

      Here are three extremely late, but still interesting, Latin manuscripts.

      At the Morgan Library and Museum, there are some online exhibitions, including

      "Two Masterpieces Illustrated by Jean Poyer" -
      One is called the Book of Hours of Henry VIII (although the connection to Henry VIII might not be entirely secure). It was made around 1500. A page featuring text from Mark 16:14ff is at
      http://www.themorgan.org/collections/swf/exhibOnline.asp?id=315

      Another online exhibition features the Prayer Book of Anne de Bretagne, from the same period:
      http://www.themorgan.org/collections/swf/exhibOnline.asp?id=370

      And, a very impressive little manuscript, the Prayer Book of Claude de France, is at
      http://www.themorgan.org/exhibitions/claude.asp . There are links to a thorough digital lecture about this manuscript by Roger Wieck, and digital images of every page! In addition, each page has an "About This Page" pop-up describing and explaining whatever is featured on each page. Zoomify allows you to see the incredible detail of this book -- go ahead and try it out in Full Screen mode -- for instance, consider the detail in the Nativity-scene at
      http://www.themorgan.org/collections/swf/exhibOnline.asp?id=1019 or the Adoration of the Magi scene at
      http://www.themorgan.org/collections/swf/exhibOnline.asp?id=1020 or the picture of St. Veronica at
      http://www.themorgan.org/collections/swf/exhibOnline.asp?id=1026 ! Amazing! Several of the martyrology-scenes elsewhere in the manuscript are interesting. St. Nicholas, for example, is pictured at http://www.themorgan.org/collections/swf/exhibOnline.asp?id=1034 resurrecting the three murdered children in the pickle-barrel. St. Martin is pictured at http://www.themorgan.org/collections/swf/exhibOnline.asp?id=1037 meeting the beggar to whom he gave half his cloak. Jerome is pictured at http://www.themorgan.org/collections/swf/exhibOnline.asp?id=1039 and at http://www.themorgan.org/collections/swf/exhibOnline.asp?id=1040 .

      (Wouldn't it be great to see a Greek Gospels-manuscript presented online in this way, with pop-ups describing each page and pointing out unusual features, and with Zoomify allowing viewers to zoom in and see such minute details?)

      This tiny book was being painted and written as Erasmus' Greek NT text was being printed. (I imagine the artist thinking, "Let's see those printing presses match /this/!")

      Pages featuring the Vulgate text of Mark 16:14-20 with some incipit-caused variants (and, in the border, scenes depicting the martyrdom of Mark (Is that supposed to be the Pharos lighthouse in the background?)) are at
      http://www.themorgan.org/collections/swf/exhibOnline.asp?id=1004 and
      http://www.themorgan.org/collections/swf/exhibOnline.asp?id=1005 .

      Mrs. Alexandre P. Rosenberg gave the Prayer Book of Claude de France to the Morgan Library and Museum in memory of her husband Alexandre Paul Rosenberg, in 2008. Thank you, Mrs. Rosenberg! Thanks also to Gifford Combs, who funded the exhibit, and to Christie's, its corporate sponsor, and to curator Roger Wieck, and to Schecter Lee, who did the photography.

      Merry Christmas!

      Yours in Christ,

      James Snapp, Jr.
      Minister, Curtisville Christian Church
      Indiana
    • Daniel Buck
      Speaking of incipit-caused variants, what is the nature of Latin lectionaries? We hear so much about the Greek ones, as if only the Easterners used them.  Or
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 7, 2011
        Speaking of incipit-caused variants, what is the nature of Latin lectionaries? We hear so much about the Greek ones, as if only the Easterners used them.  Or did they?
         
        Daniel Buck


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