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Westwood's Palaeographia Sacra Pictoria (1845)

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  • james_snapp_jr
    J. O. Westwood s 1845 Palaeographia Sacra Pictoria is online! This book is remarkable for its /color/ reproductions (the coloring may seem no marvelous
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 16, 2011
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      J. O. Westwood's 1845 "Palaeographia Sacra Pictoria" is online! This book is remarkable for its /color/ reproductions (the coloring may seem no marvelous thing nowadays, but in 1845 it was probably a magnificent feat) and clear descriptions of a variety of MSS -- Greek, Latin, Syriac, etc. -- which include not only major codices such as Codex D but also some minor and tantalizingly obscure witnesses. It is not only an exquisite book, but (for the most part) a sound introduction to the materials it covers.

      http://books.google.com/books?id=oWAjAQAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false

      This is one of several recent additions to my online NTTC Google Books library.

      Yours in Christ,

      James Snapp, Jr.
    • Daniel Buck
      The book of Kells is a late eighth or early ninth century illuminated Latin gospel books. Like all insular gospels, it contains traces of the Old Latin, but is
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 17, 2011
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        The book of Kells is a late eighth or early ninth century illuminated Latin gospel books. Like all insular gospels, it contains traces of the Old Latin, but is nonetheless classified as a Vulgate manuscript.

        The below mentioned online book (e-pg. 27) quotes John 3:6 in Kells as follows:
        quod natum est ex carne caro est quia de carne natum est et quod natum ex et spu sps est quia ds sps est et ex do natus est 

        Playing around with the Latin on Google Translate, I get:

        Quod natum est ex carne caro est quia de carne natum est et quod natum ex et spiritu spiritus est quia deos spiritus est et ex deo natus est 
        That which is born of the flesh is flesh, because it is born of the flesh; and that which is born of the Spirit is Spirit, because God is Spirit, and (it) is born of God.

        These words were "struck out by the Arians", according to Father Simon, there being no textual basis for them in Latin. They are, however, also found in the "silver gospels at Vercelli."

        Daniel Buck

        From: james_snapp_jr <voxverax@...>

         
        J. O. Westwood's 1845 "Palaeographia Sacra Pictoria" is online! This book is remarkable for its /color/ reproductions (the coloring may seem no marvelous thing nowadays, but in 1845 it was probably a magnificent feat) and clear descriptions of a variety of MSS -- Greek, Latin, Syriac, etc. -- which include not only major codices such as Codex D but also some minor and tantalizingly obscure witnesses. It is not only an exquisite book, but (for the most part) a sound introduction to the materials it covers.

        http://books.google.com/books?id=oWAjAQAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false

      • TeunisV
        Edward Sullivan, The Book of Kells, 1920, p. 26, note: As will be seen, p. 24 ante, Westwood misreads the contractions ds an do as divinus and domino
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 20, 2011
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          Edward Sullivan, The Book of Kells, 1920, p. 26, note:
          'As will be seen, p. 24 ante, Westwood misreads the contractions "ds" an "do" as "divinus" and "domino" instead of "deus" and "deo".'
          Compare Von Sodens apparatus, where the Old Latin and Syrian variants and Hilarius, Ambrosius are presented. Merk copied Von Soden.
          See Zahn's commentary ad loc., where he indicated the Old Latin and Greek (161*) variants as glosses.
          See Vogel's Handbuch der neutestamentlichen Textkritik, 1923, p. 220, where he suggested a Tatian variant.

          Teunis van lopik
          Leidschendam, the Netherlands

          --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, Daniel Buck <bucksburg@...> wrote:
          >
          > The book of Kells is a late eighth or early ninth century illuminated Latin gospel books. Like all insular gospels, it contains traces of the Old Latin, but is nonetheless classified as a Vulgate manuscript.
          >
          > The below mentioned online book (e-pg. 27) quotes John 3:6 in Kells as follows:
          > quod natum est ex carne caro est quia de carne natum est et quod natum ex et spu sps est quia ds sps est et ex do natus est 
          >
          >
          > Playing around with the Latin on Google Translate, I get:
          >
          > Quod natum est ex carne caro est quia de carne natum est et quod natum ex et spiritu spiritus est quia deos spiritus est et ex deo natus est 
          > That which is born of the flesh is flesh, because it is born of the flesh; and that which is born of the Spirit is Spirit, because God is Spirit, and (it) is born of God.
          >
          > These words were "struck out by the Arians", according to Father Simon, there being no textual basis for them in Latin. They are, however, also found in the "silver gospels at Vercelli."
          >
          > Daniel Buck
          >
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: james_snapp_jr <voxverax@...>
          >
          >  
          > J. O. Westwood's 1845 "Palaeographia Sacra Pictoria" is online! This book is remarkable for its /color/ reproductions (the coloring may seem no marvelous thing nowadays, but in 1845 it was probably a magnificent feat) and clear descriptions of a variety of MSS -- Greek, Latin, Syriac, etc. -- which include not only major codices such as Codex D but also some minor and tantalizingly obscure witnesses. It is not only an exquisite book, but (for the most part) a sound introduction to the materials it covers.
          >
          > http://books.google.com/books?id=oWAjAQAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false
          >
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