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Expert on the Septuagint

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  • D Jongkind
    Dear list, Currently I am reading Chadwick s Lexicographica Graeca in which he points out some deficiencies in the LSJ. He describes the bad influence of a
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 5, 2005
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      Dear list,

      Currently I am reading Chadwick's Lexicographica Graeca in which he points out some deficiencies in the LSJ. He describes the 'bad' influence of a certain LXX scholar and I am curious who this may have been. This is the passage (p. 16):

      "Another hazard [in making a dictionary; DJ] encountered is the notes sent to the publisher by well-meaning amateurs. By 'amateurs' I mean of course people with no lexicographic training' they may be, and often are, scholars of distinction in their own fields. The 1968 Supplement suffered badly at the hands of an expert on the Septuagint, who seems to have assumed that the Greek word selected by the translators of iii BC must have the meaning which modern scholarship attributes to the corresponding Hebrew expression. [etc.]"

      Does anyone know who this scholar was?

      Cheers,
      Dirk Jongkind
    • James Spinti
      Dirk, I m not sure who the scholar might be, but in Biblical Greek Language and Lexicography Essays in Honor of Frederick W. Danker (ISBN: 0802822169), John
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 5, 2005
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        Dirk,

        I'm not sure who the scholar might be, but in "Biblical Greek Language and
        Lexicography
        Essays in Honor of Frederick W. Danker" (ISBN: 0802822169), John A.L. Lee in
        his contribution (pp 66-75) makes some observations on the Supplement which
        reflect negatively on it also, specifically on the LXX citations.

        Sincerely,

        James Spinti
        Marketing Director, Book Sales Division
        Eisenbrauns, Specializing in Ancient Near Eastern and Biblical Studies
        jspinti at eisenbrauns dot com
        Web: http://www.eisenbrauns.com
        Phone: 574-269-2011 ext 226
        Fax 574-269-6788


        -----Original Message-----
        From: D Jongkind [mailto:dj214@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, April 05, 2005 5:24 AM
        To: textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [textualcriticism] Expert on the Septuagint


        Dear list,

        Currently I am reading Chadwick's Lexicographica Graeca in which he points
        out some deficiencies in the LSJ. He describes the 'bad' influence of a
        certain LXX scholar and I am curious who this may have been. This is the
        passage (p. 16):

        "Another hazard [in making a dictionary; DJ] encountered is the notes sent
        to the publisher by well-meaning amateurs. By 'amateurs' I mean of course
        people with no lexicographic training' they may be, and often are, scholars
        of distinction in their own fields. The 1968 Supplement suffered badly at
        the hands of an expert on the Septuagint, who seems to have assumed that the
        Greek word selected by the translators of iii BC must have the meaning which
        modern scholarship attributes to the corresponding Hebrew expression.
        [etc.]"

        Does anyone know who this scholar was?

        Cheers,
        Dirk Jongkind
      • mjriii2003
        ... Dear Dirk, Although I can t help you with the identification that you seek, this highlighted problem is simply indicative of the unevenness of scholarly
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 5, 2005
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          --- In textualcriticism@yahoogroups.com, D Jongkind <dj214@c...> wrote:
          >


          Dear Dirk,

          Although I can't help you with the identification that you seek, this
          highlighted problem is simply indicative of the unevenness of
          scholarly preparedness in almost any field of biblical studies today.
          While human knowledge has increased causing in part the symptoms that
          I mentioned above, this factor alone does not excuse the investigator
          from this moral responsibility within the circumference of the larger
          scientific fields which are related to his own specialty. The breadth
          and circumspection that characterized past investigators is now being
          lost to an innovative and capricious arrogance.

          The linguistic research required using synchronic and diachronic
          analysis would have preempted this particular problem that has
          surfaced and been pointed out in your post. However, this problem is
          not new, but in fact was pointed out by James Barr re: the analysis
          offered in some of the essays in Kittel's Theologisches Woerterbuch
          zum Neuen Testament.

          Cordially in Christ,

          Malcolm
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